Category Archives: Tips

Five Tip Friday ~ simple tips for macOS


1/ Change the default web browser in macOS Sierra — If you prefer another web browser to Safari (which I find excellent), you can change the macOS default. From the Apple () menu, choose System Preferences, then click General.
Choose your web browser from the ‘Default web browser’ pop-up menu.

2/ Set your default printer — If you have more than one printer, one thing you could do to make them slightly less annoying, though, is to choose which one to set as your default. If you print to a particular device way more often than another, it makes sense to always default to the last one you used when you choose File > Print.
Choose System Preferences from the Apple Menu at the top-left of your screen, and then click on Printers & Scanners.
You’ll see a list of your devices on the left, and you can pick which one you want as the default from the drop-down near the bottom of the window. Close the System Preferences window, and when you print something afterwards, your Mac will assume you want to use the device you set as the default.
You can click the drop-down show to temporarily switch to a different printer if you need to, but it will always revert back to the default for the next job.

3/ Move the cursor with your keyboard — If your mousing hand needs a break, or perhaps you need to move the mouse pointer one teeny-tiny pixel at a time, there’s a way to move the Mac mouse pointer with the keyboard rather than nudging the mouse or swiping your trackpad.
Turn on the Mac feature called Mouse Keys, which lets you move the Mac mouse pointer by tapping the keys on your numeric keypad or, if you don’t have a separate numeric keypad, by pressing a set of keys within the keyboard itself.
Open the Mac’s System Preferences by clicking the Apple menu in the top-left corner of the screen, select System Preferences. Click Accessibility, select Mouse & Trackpad in the left column, then check the Enable Mouse Keys checkbox. This lets you move your mouse pointer using a numeric trackpad: press the 8 key to nudge the Mac mouse up a tad. The 2 key will move the mouse down, while the 4 and 6 keys move the mouse left and right, respectively. The 7, 9, 1, and 3 keys move the Mac mouse up and to the left, up and to the right, down and to the left, and down and to the right. (There’s more on this at Here’s The Thing.)

4/ Force the Finder to restart in macOS Sierra — Represented by the blue icon with the smiling face, the macOS Sierra Finder is the home-base app for your Mac. You use it to organise and access almost everything on your Mac, including documents, images, movies, and any other files you have. However, sometimes you need to restart it if it’s acting up or if you’ve installed an app that requires a restart. To do so: in Finder, click the  menu and hold down the Shift key on your keyboard.
Click Force Quit Finder.
You can also hold down the ⌥ (option) key on your keyboard.
Click on the Finder icon in your Dock.
Choose Relaunch from the bottom of the pop-out list that appears.

5/ Search Google directly without even firing up a browser — You can use your Mac’s Spotlight to directly search using your default search engine. Type something in Spotlight that you want to search on Google, then, press Command (⌘) + B. It will open Safari with your search term…

Five tip Friday ~ The Calendar App and iCloud


1/ Edit appointment details using the Calendar Inspector in macOS Sierra — The Inspector window appears when you add a new event, or double-click on an existing event in the Calendar app in macOS Sierra, or click and event once and choose Command-e.
Inspector shows you all the details of your events, including who’s invited, and where and when you want the event to occur. Start typing an address and Calendar suggests matching locations. Start typing the name of a contact in your Address Book and Calendar suggests matching names based on contacts you’ve entered in the Contacts app.
You can even see your event locations on a miniature map in the Inspector. (If you click this mini map, the Maps app opens a full size view.)  The mini map includes an estimate of the travel time to your appointment destination from your current location in the event Inspector as well as the weather forecast for that day. (For travel time estimates, directions and weather, you need to turn on Location Services in System Preferences.)

2/ Use your iCloud account in macOS Sierra’s Calendar app — iCloud is included with macOS. Once you sign up for your free iCloud account, you can push calendar updates across your devices, share your iCloud Calendar, and see your calendar on the iCloud website.
If you have an iCloud account , you can use iCal to access and manage your iCloud calendars. If you set up the iCloud Calendar service on several devices and computers, your iCloud calendar and reminder information is kept up to date on each device and computer.
Set up your iCloud calendar account from System Preferences to see your iCloud-based calendars in the Calendar window. In the System Preferences app, click iCloud and sign in.
If this is your first time signing in from this computer, you’ll be asked if you want to use iCloud for contacts, calendars, and bookmarks. Make sure that the calendars option is selected (checked), then click Next.
If you’ve previously signed in to iCloud, you’ll see a list of iCloud services – select the check-box next to Calendars to have them sync.

3/ Add calendars to macOS Sierra’s Calendar from other services besides iCloud — You can use your iCloud account in macOS Sierra’s Calendar app to add an event, and this appears as if by magic on all your other Apple devices linked to that same Apple ID. But you can also add appointments from other popular services to your calendar in Calendar app, including Exchange, CalDAV, Facebook, and Yahoo:
Choose Apple Menu () > System Preferences.
Select Internet Accounts.
Click the Add Account (+) button at the bottom of the window.
Choose the account type you want to use, and enter your account credentials.
Make sure the option Calendars is selected (checked) to display the events associated with this account in the Calendar app. [These three Calendar tips came form the Apple World Today.]

4/ iCloud Drive and syncing iWork documents to your iOS devices — Those files aren’t necessarily being stored on your iPhone or iPad. Meaning that if you’re out and about, heading into a bad cell area may cause you to lose access to said files. Which is a bummer.
To check out what your situation, just open any of the iWork apps (Pages, Numbers, or Keynote) on your iOS device. When you do so, you’ll see a list of your documents of that type. If some of the files are in iCloud but aren’t downloaded, you’ll see a tiny cloud icon on those.
Of course, you can tap to download any one you’d like, but if what you really want is to keep all documents of that kind on your iPhone or iPad at all times, head over to your Settings. Scroll down until you see the section for the app you’d like to download stuff for and tap it.
Within that, look for the “On-Demand Downloads” toggle.
Turn that OFF, and everything you’ve got within that app will download so you can keep all your documents on your iPhone. This is great if you’re going on a trip and don’t want to use cellular data, for example, or if you just know you always need access to your spreadsheets. But be careful—I strongly suggest that you go into the app in question and make certain that the process has completed before you hit the road. You might even want to turn on Airplane Mode for the device and try to open a file or two. Paranoid? Heck, that’s just who I am. Almost a decade of tech support has traumatized taught me well.

5/ iSee the status of uploads in iCloud Drive — While we’re messing with iCloud,  you can turn on Finder’s Status Bar, the option for which is under the View menu click on the iCloud Drive option in Finder’s sidebar (shown above), and suddenly you’ll get a lot more information about your uploads.
Also turn the Path Bar on (View > Show Path Bar, shown below). This is helpful if you’d like to have a trail of breadcrumbs, so to speak, leading back within the folder structure you’ve navigated through – this appears at the bottom of folder windows. Any of the location icons in the Path Bar are double-clickable, as well, to return you to someplace you’ve been. Useful if you tend to drill way deep down into folders and then forget where you came from! Not that I ever do that myself, oh no.

Five Tip Friday ~ 3 for iOS, 2 for Apple Watch


1/ Make Home Button Touch ID work like it used to — iOS 10 brought a big change to the way the Home Button worked by requiring users to press it, even after your fingerprint has been recognised. But there’s a feature under Settings>General>Accessibility that allows you to make your Home Button work like it used to – it makes your iPhone or iPad with Touch ID unlock with just a touch from the lock screen.
In Settings > General > Accessibility, scroll down until you see the Home Button menu item. Tap it.
In this area, you can change the click speed of the Home Button, and control whether Siri or Voice Dictation activates when you press and hold. But at the bottom, you’ll see a switch called Rest Finger to Open. Tap that. Once enabled, you can open your iPhone with Touch ID the old way: just press your finger against it, instead of having to press it first. This isn’t a full return to iOS’s Slide-to-Unlock, but many users might find it more natural than the default way of doing things.

2/ Vibrate Only for certain events — On your iOS devices, there are settings that control which sounds play for which events, like when an email comes in or you get a text. with an iPhone, you can also choose for certain events to have no associated sounds but to vibrate your device instead. For me, this is really useful: you might like to know right away when you get a text, say, so you will have a sound associated with that, but for emails, no. You can set those to vibrate only (actually, I have email alerts turned off on iPhone, that way I only get them when I check them, which suits me better).
Open the Settings app on your iPhone, then tap Sounds & Haptics.
Under that section are some very useful choices. At the top you can configure whether your device will vibrate when it’s ringing or when it’s on silent. Scroll down a bit to set up which sounds you’d like to hear for which events.

3/ Backing up Voice Memos — Sometimes you can’t beat a quick Voice Memo to record a thought, tune or to-do. But since there is no Voice Memo folder in iCloud Drive, and while memos are part of your iPhone backup (and they also back up to iTunes on Mac./PC if that’s what you prefer as your backup), we can also make use of the share sheet put them somewhere specific.
You can create a folder in iCloud Drive (or your cloud provider of choice) for audio clips. For apple’s free iCloud Drive online storage, chick iCloud on your Mac in the left side of a Finder window and choose New Folder from the File menu. Another option is to create a note or folder in Apple Notes dedicated to voice memos.
On iPhone, go into the Voice Memos app, tap on a recording and hit the share button (shown below). From here, you can select Add to iCloud Drive or Add to Notes.

You can also straight AirDrop them. Tap on a recording and then the share button as above, make sure Bluetooth is enabled on your iPhone and Mac, and you can look for your Mac’s account photo under AirDrop.
If your audio recordings are large in size, using iTunes is another way to share. Connect your iPhone to your Mac, and click the phone symbol on the upper left. Next, click on Apps in the sidebar, and scroll all the way to the bottom until you see Voice Memos. You can then drag and drop your audio clips to any location in your Mac.

4/ Combine watchOS 3.2 ‘Theater Mode’ with ‘Wake Screen on Crown Up’ to discreetly check time on Apple Watch Series 2 — Here’s how to combine the two features. All current Apple Watch hardware has access to the watchOS 3.2 update, which adds the new Theater Mode option in Control Center. To access it, simply swipe up from the bottom of the display on a watch face, and choose the icon depicting comedy and tragedy masks.
But while all Apple Watch users can access theater mode, the next part of the tip is specifically limited to Series 2 hardware. Since the second-generation hardware debuted last September, it has exclusively offered a new feature known as Wake Screen on Crown Up. To enable this feature, open the Apple Watch app on a connected iPhone, choose General, and then Wake Screen. By default, new Apple Watch Series 2 units ship with Wake Screen on Crown Upenabled.
Theater Mode prevents your Apple Watch display from lighting up when your wrist is turned, which can be annoying in a dark movie theatre, for example. Users must instead tap the display in order to check the time.
However, when Wake Screen on Crown Up is enabled, users can also slowly brighten the display by turning the Digital Crown. As the digital crown is rolled forward, the Apple Watch Series 2 screen becomes gradually more visible, allowing users to keep the light from their watch dim – a particularly handy feature for politely checking the time without bothering others, while in a movie theatre or at a play.
After checking the time, users can either roll the Digital Crown back toward them to dim the display until it goes dark, or simply wait about three seconds for the screen to automatically go black.
If you roll the Digital Crown further upwards, the display will become fully “on,” at the normally set brightness, and will not automatically dim as long as your wrist is facing you. In this situation, simply turn your wrist away from you as you normally would, and the display will automatically shut off. Because Theater Mode is enabled, the screen will not automatically turn back on regardless of the orientation of your wrist.
(If you want to be extra polite while at the movies, you can also create a low-light watch face that will make the display even less noticeable. Simply create a new Modular face, set it to red (which helps preserve night vision), and disable all its watch face complications.)

5/ Reining in watchOS — You don’t have to automatically Install Apple Watch Apps. Some of the apps that go along with it may not be that relevant to you. Depending on when you set up your wearable device, it may automatically install all new apps to the Apple Watch. You don’t have to automatically install Apple Watch apps. Apple Watch has a limited amount of storage space, and any music and photos you have take up some of it, so you may want to limit how many apps you install. Secondly, not all of the Watch apps are incredibly useful and you might find yourself wanting to get rid of them.
Open the Watch app on your iPhone
Scroll down and tap General
Flip the toggle switch next to Automatic App Install so it is no longer green
Remove the Apps You Don’t Use
Once you’ve turned off Automatic App Install, you might want to clear out some of the apps you aren’t using. Return to the My Watch screen, and scroll down until you see your list of third-party apps. If you see Installed next to an app, it’s already there. Tap on the apps one at a time. You’ll see a toggle switch for each labeled Show App on Apple Watch. Flip that switch so it’s no longer green. Apple Watch will uninstall that app. When you come across an app you do want to install, just flip that switch so it’s green. Apple Watch will install the app for you to use.

Five Tip Friday ~ Your Mac online with Safari and iCloud


1/ Recover lost tabs and windows in Safari — Some users have a lot of Safari tabs open all the time. For some folks, open tabs are apparently a way to remember to follow up on things or purchase items. It’s much more sensible to use Bookmarks but hey, we’re all different. But if you close a tab and didn’t mean to, the menu item to recover them is under History at the top of your screen.
Within that menu (above), you will see Recently Closed, which will show you tabs and windows you may have dismissed accidentally. Click any single item to reopen that one page.

2/ Reopen Last Closed [Window/Tab] — This does just what it says, and Reopen All Windows from Last Session, which is handy if Safari didn’t restore your tabs after it was quit for whatever reason. (These options may look a little different or say slightly different things depending on exactly how many tabs you closed, for example, but if you’re looking to get back what you lost, this History menu is very handy.
Of course, if all you want is to undo accidentally closing a tab right after you did it, you’d just press Command-Z like you would anywhere else in any Mac operation to undo your last action.  You can also press this key combo multiple times to get back several tabs if you went on a closing frenzy and then came to your senses.

3/ Uploading files from a browser via iCloud — Log into iCloud.com on the computer you’d like to upload files from. Head to Photos if you want to upload images to your iCloud Photo Library or iCloud Drive for all other types of files.
In either place, you’ll see an Upload button at the top of your browser window (indicated above). Choose that, and you’ll get the familiar file-picker dialog box, from which you can navigate to the items you’d like to upload.
How long your upload will take is dependent on the size of the file(s) you select and your internet speed. If you signed in to your iCloud account on a machine that isn’t yours, make sure to log out before you walk away.
The beauty of this trick is most apparent if you’re using iCloud Photo Library or the Mac’s Desktop and Documents syncing feature. In the case of photos, for example, anything you upload to iCloud.com will be immediately distributed to all of your devices if that syncing is turned on.
For iCloud Drive, though, whatever folder you’re looking at online will be where the files you upload end up. So you could navigate to iCloud.com, open iCloud Drive, double-click to view your Desktop folder, and then upload files there. When you get back to your Mac, you’ll see the stuff you uploaded, already on your Desktop and ready to go. [From the Mac Observer.]

4/ Connect to a remote Mac in your Back to My Mac network with macOS Sierra — With macOS Sierra’s Back to My Mac, you can connect to your other Macs securely over the Internet. This is an iCloud feature that lets you set up a network of Macs that you can access remotely.  After you set up each Mac or AirPort base station, you can connect to it remotely.
From the Finder menu, choose Preferences, and click the Sidebar tab.
In the Shared section, select Back to My Mac.
Open a Finder window, and look for the Shared section in the sidebar. If you don’t see any shared computers or base stations, place the pointer over the word Shared and click Show.
Select the remote computer or base station that you want to access and click Connect As. (To share a screen with your remote Mac, select the Mac and click Share Screen.) If you don’t see the Mac or base station that you’re looking for, click All to see a list of available Mac computers and base stations.

5/ Remove a Mac from your Back to My Mac network on macOS Sierra — You can turn off Back to My Mac whenever you want (here’s how you set it up). When you do, you’ll remove that Mac or AirPort base station from your Back to My Mac network.
Follow these steps:
Choose System Preferences from the  menu, then click iCloud.
In iCloud preferences, deselect Back to My Mac to turn it off. You also can click Sign Out to log out of iCloud completely.
To remove a base station, follow these steps:
From the menu bar, choose Go > Utilities and double-click AirPort Utility.
Select the AirPort base station that you don’t want to use anymore, and click Edit. If you don’t see the base station, click Other Wi-Fi Devices to see a list of available base stations. You might need to choose a different Network Interface from the pop-up menu.
Enter the base station password. This password is different from your iCloud password.
Select the Base Station tab.
In the Back to my Mac section, click the – (minus) button and enter the Apple ID you use with Back to My Mac. The green status indicator should disappear, showing that Back to My Mac is turned off.
Click Update to save your changes.

Five Tip Friday ~ some for Mac users: Back to my Mac, non-printing characters, old file versions, emptying Trash, files as pathnames


1/ Set up and use Back to my Mac on macOS Sierra — If you have an iCloud account, you can use ‘Back to My Mac’ to connect to your other Macs over the Internet. You can then use Screen Sharing to control the remote computer from anywhere you are connected to the Internet.
(To use Back to My Mac, you must have an Apple AirPort Base Station or AirPort Time Capsule set up for NAT-PMP, or NAT Port Mapping Protocol, or a router set up for UPnP (Universal Plug and Play)
You can also share files between computers, including files that aren’t stored in iCloud Drive (such as files in your Downloads, Movies, and Pictures folders). First you set up Back to My Mac on each computer, and then you can connect from one Mac to the others. Do the following on each computer you want to use with Back to My Mac:
Choose Apple menu > System Preferences, then click iCloud.
Select Back to My Mac.
If you aren’t signed in to iCloud already, you must set up iCloud before you can select Back to My Mac.
Follow any instructions you see to turn on sharing services, select “Wake for network access,” or make any other changes necessary for Back to My Mac.
To connect to your Mac:
In a Finder sidebar, look in the Shared section for the Mac you want to connect to.
If nothing is listed in the Shared section, hold the pointer to the right of Shared, then click Show.
If you don’t see the Shared heading in the sidebar, choose Finder > Preferences, click Sidebar, then select Back to My Mac in the Shared section.
Click the computer you want to use, then click Connect As or Share Screen. (From Apple World Today).

2/ Viewing non printing characters in word processor documents — Pages has a way that you can show and hide what it dubs invisible characters, so if you need to see paragraph returns, tabs, spaces, and so on, it’s as simple as pressing Shift-Command-I or choosing View > Show Invisibles in that program.
Microsoft Word can do this too. If the text within a document is behaving oddly, figuring out whether something behind the scenes is working against you is the way to go.
Whenever you hit keys like Tab, Return, Spacebar, and so on, Word is actually sticking ‘nonprinting characters’ in, including ‘page break’.
Turning this view on and off is simple. In the most recent version of Word, select the Home tab in the toolbar then click the giant paragraph sign, which looks of like a backwards ‘p.’ It’s a toggle button (on or off), so to turn off showing those nonprinting characters, press that button again.
You can also control which nonprinting characters show all of the time, whether you’ve toggled this button on or not. That option is available by clicking on Word>Preferences from the menus at the top of the program. Once the Preferences window opens, choose View and you’ll see exactly which characters you can choose to have showing all of the time (from Mac Observer).

3/ Deleting old versions of files — Enter the File menu in applications that support this macOS feature and choose Revert To>Browse All Versions. Navigate to the version of the file that you’d like to remove first. Once you’re there, move your cursor to the top of the screen, and your formerly hidden menu bar should reappear.  Then choose File > Revert To > Delete This Version.

4/ Force the Trash to empty — Sometimes the Trash refuses to delete a file. Quit any app that you were using with the file, then try and empty the Trash.
If that doesn’t work, the app might have one or more background processes that are using the file. Restart your Mac, then empty the Trash.
If that doesn’t work, you might have a startup item or login item that is using the file. To temporarily prevent such items from opening automatically, start up in safe mode by holding down the Shift key while your Mac starts up. Then empty the Trash and restart your Mac normally. Beyond this, you’ll have to use Recovery Mode, which you can read about at Apple World Today.

5/ Files as path names — This is verging on old school computing’, but from El Capitan, Macs have had the ability to copy files or folders as pathnames in Finder.
As an example, let’s pretend that you wanted to point someone to this file:
/System/Library/WidgetResources/AppleClasses/Images/slide_track_vbottom@2x.png
Look at how long that path is! If you were to type that out, being sure to get all of the capitalisation and so on correct, it’d take a while and it would be so easy to get just one letter wrong, which stops it working (note also that every backslash represents a folder – this is the same protocol used in web addresses).
The easier way to go is to use a shortcut: first, select the file or folder you want to copy the pathname for, then press the shortcut Option-Command-C, which is short for Finder’s Edit>Copy as Pathname menu item.
(If you plan on using the Edit menu for this rather than the shortcut, know that you have to hold down Option in order for “Copy as Pathname” to appear.)
Finally, go to wherever you’d like to put in the path, which could be an email, a message, or even Terminal, and just press Command-V to paste it as you normally would.

Five Tip Friday ~ Five for iOS


1/ Print to PDF from any app from iPhone and iPad — This trick relies upon a hidden feature of the Share Sheet. To print from any app, such as Safari, you begin by tapping the Share icon. Next, tap the Print icon from the bottom row of the Share Sheet. Depending on what you’ve enabled, you might have to scroll to the right to find it. Now, to access the PDF view, simply 3D Touch (or pinch together two fingers to zoom out, in no0n-3D Touch devices) in the preview area of the PDF.
With that done, you should be in a PDF view of your document, web page, or whatever. Your next step is to share it. Just tap the Share icon, and choose where you want to send your PDF. You can share it via Messages or Mail, or any other app that supports the Share Sheet extensions.

Another great option is iBooks, if you want to keep all of your PDFs together, but there’s often a Share Sheet icon there to do that directly. But you can even save the PDF file to your iCloud drive or Dropbox.
Saving the web pages you’ve visited to PDF is a great way to keep notes when you’re researching. Other options for where to save those PDF files include Evernote and even the built-in Notes app.

2/ Use the Remote app to control your iTunes library in macOS Sierra with your iDevice — If you have an iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch you can use the Apple Remote app — free from the Apple App Store — to control your Mac’s iTunes library from a distance.
First, pair the app with the iTunes library (or libraries) you want to control. Your device and your computer must be on the same wireless network.
If you have Remote 2.0 (or later) and Home Sharing is turned on, you can set Remote to pair automatically with any of the iTunes libraries on your Home Sharing network. You can also pair Remote directly with iTunes libraries that aren’t in your Home Sharing network. To pair the Remote with an iTunes library: Tap Remote on your device’s Home screen.
Tap Add an iTunes Library.
A 4-digit code appears.
Open iTunes on your computer and click the Remote button .
Type the 4-digit code in the iTunes window.
iTunes pairs the library on your computer with the Remote app on your device.
Pair Remote with your Home Sharing network.
To use Remote 2.0 (or later) with Home Sharing, every iTunes library you want to control must have Home Sharing turned on.
Tap Remote on your device’s Home screen.
Tap Settings.
Tap to turn Home Sharing on.
Type your Apple ID and password, and tap Done.
Tap the iTunes library or Apple TV you want to control.

3/ Use Home Sharing to import items from another iTunes library — You can use Home Sharing to import items from up to five iTunes libraries on other computers on your home network? You can (assuming you have an Apple ID).
When you use your Mac on your Home Sharing network to download an item from the iTunes Store, you can have the item download automatically to other computers on your Home Sharing network.
Turn on Home Sharing. Choose File > Home Sharing > Turn On Home Sharing.
Type in your Apple ID and password, and click Turn On Home Sharing.
If you don’t have an Apple ID, click “Don’t have an Apple ID?” and follow the onscreen instructions.
To import items from other libraries using Home Sharing, choose a computer on your Home Sharing network from the Library pop-up menu. The library loads and a list of categories appears.
Choose a category (Music, for example). In the Show menu at the bottom of the iTunes window, choose “Items not in my library.” Select the items you want to import, and click Import.
To automatically import new iTunes Stores purchases from another computer, choose a computer on your Home Sharing network from the Library pop-up menu. Choose a category (Music, for example).
Click Settings at the bottom of the window. In the window that appears, select “Automatically transfer new purchases from Library Name.” Select the types of items you want to import. Click OK.
To turn off Home Sharing, on each computer, choose File > Home Sharing > Turn Off Home Sharing. If a shared computer doesn’t appear when Home Sharing is on, turn Home Sharing off, and then turn it on again.

4/ Disable homescreen rotation on Apple’s Plus-series iPhones — By default, Apple’s iPhone 6 Plus, 6s Plus, and 7 Plus add an auto-rotating home screen to iOS, rearranging icons and the dock whenever a device is tilted sideways.
Aside from the Control Center orientation lock, here’s an indirect way of achieving the same result:
Within the Settings app, tap on Display & Brightness, then on “View” under the Display Zoomcategory towards the very bottom. Nominally this option just makes it easier to browse and tap on icons. As a consequence of using it, however, the home screen will no longer rotate.
To make the switch, tap on ‘Zoomed,’ then on ‘Set.’ Technically an iPhone has to reset to apply the change, but unlike a normal reboot this should only take several seconds.
That’s it — to reverse course, go back to the Display Zoom menu and select ‘Standard’ instead. The above method works in iOS 9 and 10.
Note that at least some apps, like Apple Messages, will continue to rotate their own interfaces even with Display Zoom on, and there may be no way of disabling this within an app’s settings. [From AppleInsider.]

5/ Using 3D Touch — If you have iPhone 6s or later, you may not be using 3D Touch, a more pressured press on the screen that releases a wealth of extra possibilities, for example when you are typing:
The first time you 3D Touch anywhere on the keyboard, you can start dragging the cursor around to place it in a specific spot. It’s a great way to get exact placement without fidgeting with your finger.
But, if you don’t lift your finger after that first 3D Touch and do it again, you’ll select the adjacent full word. 3D Touch one more time without lifting, and you’ll select the entire sentence surrounding the cursor. These extra actions take a little practice, but they’re darn handy once you get them down. [Here are a whole lot more handy 3D Touch features, from the Mac Observer.]

 

Five Tip Friday ~ Pages, Keynote, Numbers collaboration and more on macOS and iOS


Yes it’s Good Friday already in New Zealand, and yes I’m up, and yes I am going to work, as the museum I work at only closes on Christmas Day. Luckily I have time to add some tips for you.
By default, people that you invite can edit your document, but the initial sharer can change share options and limit who can access it (from Apple World Today).

1/ Apple’s Pages, Numbers and Keynote apps for macOS and iOS allow you to collaborate — You can invite others to your documents and work on them together in real time. Here’s how to use iWork collaboration on a Mac with macOS Sierra and Pages 6.0, Numbers 4.0, or Keynote 7.0 or later;
An iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch with iOS 10 and Pages 3.0, Numbers 3.0, or Keynote 3.0 or later;
A Mac with Safari 6.0.3 or later, or Google Chrome 27.0.1 or later;
and even on a Windows PC with Internet Explorer 11 or later, or Google Chrome 27.0.1 or later.
To invite others to collaborate you must be signed in to iCloud on your device and have iCloud Drive turned on. If you’re using a web browser, sign in to iCloud.com and open the iWork app you want to use.
If you have an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch with earlier versions of iOS or iWork apps, or if you have an Android device, you can view documents but can’t edit them.
When you invite people to collaborate on a document, spreadsheet, or presentation, the app creates an iCloud.com link for you to send to them. If you limit access so that only people you invite can collaborate on your document, they must sign in to iCloud or iCloud.com with their Apple ID. The name of the document is included in the URL. If the title or content of the document is confidential, make sure to ask participants not to forward the link to anyone else.
Here’s how to invite other people from your Mac. From Pages, Numbers, or Keynote, open the document you want to share. In the toolbar, click the share icon — a head with a checkmark by it.
Tap Add People to add people. Tap your preferred method for sending the link. If you choose to email your invitation, type an email address or phone number for each person you want to invite. Add any other information, then send or post the message.
The share icon — a head with a checkmark by it —  indicates that a document is shared. The checkmark changes to show how many people have the document open (not including you).

 

2/ Collaborating in iOS — Here’s how to invite other folks from your iPhone, iPad or iPod touch: if your document is already open in Pages, Numbers, or Keynote, tap the three dot icon, then tap Collaborate With Others. If you’re in the Document Manager, tap the share icon,  then tap Collaborate With Others. Tap the document you want to share. If the document you select hasn’t downloaded to your device, it downloads now.

3/ Protect with a password — If you set Who Can Access to ‘Anyone with the link, and you want to add a password, tap Add Password. Type your password and hint. You and other participants need this password to open the document.

4/ Invite other people from iCloud.com — If your document is already open in Pages, Numbers, or Keynote for iCloud, click the share icon in the toolbar. If you’re in the Document Manager, select a document, then click the icon that looks like a gear. Now choose Collaborate With Others.

5/ Password protect iWork documents anyway — Here’s how to password-protect Pages, Numbers, Keynote docs in macOS Sierra: From Pages, Keynote or Numbers, open the document that you want to secure with a password.
Go to the File menu and choose Select Set Password.
Enter a password and a hint.
That’s it! As you set a password, a small lock icon will appear on that particular document indicating that it’s secured with a password. The next time you need to access the doc on any Apple device or via iCloud, you’ll be asked for a password.

Five Tip Friday ~ Sharing locations, closing all apps, Safari reader and DNS in iOS


1/ Share your location quickly from the Maps app — It’s pretty quick to share your location in Messages, but sometimes you’re in the Maps app when you suddenly think ‘it would be great to tell so-n-so this is where I am, or will be…’ and to be able to do this via other apps like Mail, as well.
Luckily, this is possible.
In the Maps app, navigate to the location you want to pin and share. Tap and hold on that location until the round red pin flag appears (shown at left).
To fine-tune the location, tap on Edit Location – now you can drag the map around until the pin is exactly where you want it.
Anyway, once you’ve got it where you want it, tap Done to go back to the main map screen.)
Now tap the Share button (marked above, at lower right) to send out the pin location to whoever you want, via Messages, Mail, Twitter, Facebook, or with any other app with its Sharing Sheet extension turned on.

2/ Share your GPS coordinates — To get really geeky, you can also share your precise geographical coordinates. Open up the Compass app and wait a few seconds. Your latitude and longitude should appear at the bottom of the screen. Tap and hold on the coordinates, and then choose Copy: you can now paste your coordinates into a text message, email or anywhere else.

After you double-click your Home button, you can swipe left and right through running apps to quickly change to another (tap on the one you want) or swipe upwards to ‘quit’ them (stop them using your iDevice’s resources, RAM, data etc)

3/ Close all running apps in one hit — This is contentious with some claiming it’s not necessary. But I’m firmly in the camp that having dozens of apps running at once makes your iDevice laggy, since apps don’t automatically quit when you can’t see them on iPhone/iPad. In other words, having an app running, then pressing the Home button to launch another app, actually leaves that first app running until you can have dozens of apps all running at once – you can see this by double-clicking the Home button, from which view you can swipe apps upwards to actually quit them, or swipe left and right to go through them and tap the ones you want to work or play in again.
But the following process suspends all your apps, freeing up memory and processor time:
• Press the Sleep/Wake button until you see the slider to shut down your iPhone.
• Now press and hold the Home Button for approximately five seconds, or until you are returned to either your Lock or Home Screen…
That’s it, your apps have all been suspended. If you double-press the Home Button, you’ll still see each of them still listed as if they are running, and they’re still instantly available form this view, but you might notice these apps actually refresh (or relaunch) when you tap on them. That’s because they’ve actually been properly suspended, freeing up memory.

4/ Shared Links in iOS Safari — Shared Links is a tab that’s been around since iOS 7, but was used to just support Twitter accounts. Now the feature also supports RSS feeds. To get to the shared links, tap on the Bookmarks button at the bottom row of Safari. Next, tap on the tab with the “@” sign, and you’ll be in your Shared Links. One of the first feeds that will show up in Shared Links, if you have signed into the social media network in the Settings app, is your Twitter timeline. Long-hold on that Bookmarks button, and a new menu pops up with Add Bookmark, Add to Reading List and Add to Shared Links. Tap on that last one, and voilà, the RSS feed for the page you’re looking shows up.
If Add to Shared Links doesn’t appear, try going to an article on that site instead of the home page. The Shared Links option will often appear then.

5/ Easily change your DNS — This won’t apply to most people, but it’s possible to change your DNS address to access more online than your typical ISP might allow. DNS stands for Domain Name System, the type of system used to name any device or service connected to the internet. It translates numerical IP addresses to more human-friendly names (ie, to http://www.mac-nz.com). Your browser requests are sent to a DNS server controlled by a third party – usually this would be your ISP. But it’s possible for your ISP to know which websites you visit, but also censor websites it doesn’t like. Thankfully, there are DNS services that are committed to privacy and defeating censorship. Assuming you know some of these like OpenNicProject: you will need the DNS addresses: a series of numbers separated by full stops.
Open the Settings app on your iOS device and navigate to Wi-Fi and find the network you’re connected to. Tap the blue “i” to the right of it. This is where you see the network settings.
Look for the section called DNS. You can tap on the empty space, and type in the DNS primary and secondary server. Type in the primary address first, followed by a comma (no space), then the secondary server address.

Five Tip Friday ~ Tidiness tips for macOS


1/ Minimise apps into their icons — You can click the yellow pill button in the upper left corner of a window to minimize an app’s window into the Dock in macOS Sierra, but if you minimize a lot of windows, the right side of the Dock quickly becomes cluttered.
The solution is to minimise windows into their app icons.
Open System Preferences from the Apple menu and choose Dock. Check the box next to ‘Minimize windows into application icon’ (shown above). Now they minimise down into the originating app’s icon – click-and-hold on that in the Dock to see your files (below).


If you have a lot of minimized app windows, and have trouble finding what you’re looking for, control-click (hold down the Control key on your keyboard and click) the app icon to reveal a list of that apps minimized windows. Choose an item from the list and it will open.

2/ Group windows by application in macOS Sierra — macOS Sierra introduced system wide tabs for most (but not all) apps, allowing you to merge multiple windows into a single window or separate merged windows.
With two or more windows of a supported app open, go to the Windows menu in the Finder and choose ‘Merge All Windows.’ All windows of the same app will be grouped into a single window. Each file you have open will appear as a tab inside the single window.
To separate the merged windows into standalone windows of their own, select the merged window to make it active. Go to the Windows and click the ‘Move Tab to New Window’ option. Click it to move the selected tab to a separate window.
This won’t separate all tabs into windows of their own, but separate the current tab to its own window. All remaining tabs will remain grouped into a single window unless you separate them one at a time.
Click the close button on a merged window, and it will close all tabs you have open in it.

3/ Move multiple Events between Calendars — If you’ve got several events you need to move to a different calendar, change to month view by pressing Command-3 or click on the Month option in Calendar’s toolbar or at top-centre of Calendar.
Now find the events you’d like to move, hold down Command on your keyboard and click on each one to select them all in turn.
When your events are all highlighted, right- or Control-click on any one of them. From the contextual menu that appears, choose the ‘Calendar’ option and pick the one you’d like to move your selected events to. Simple.

4/ Multiple ways to move items to Trash — Trash is a To put item(s) in the Trash, once can simply drag the item(s) to the Trash icon, or move highlighted file(s) to the Trash using the keyboard combo Command-Delete. If you realize you made a mistake, you can Undo the operation by choosing File > Undo, or the keyboard combo Command-Z.
If you’d like to delete highlighted items immediately, you can hold down Option and select File > Delete Immediately…. Alternately, you can use keyboard combo Command-Option-Delete. Either way, you’ll received a confirmation dialogue that the operation is permanent and can’t be undone.

5/ Empty stubborn Trash items — ToIf there are files in the Trash, which you can confirm visually because you’ll see items in the Trash, you can empty it by either choosing Finder > Empty Trash…, or using keyboard combo Shift-Cmd-Delete. You’ll be presented with a confirmation dialog asking if you’re sure. You can also hold down Option and select Finder > Empty Trash, or use keyboard combo Shift-Option-Command-Delete. Notice that since there isn’t a trailing ellipsis after the choice, it will be done immediately without a confirmation dialogue. [If this still doesnt work, you need Terminal, as detailed here.]

Five Tip Friday ~ smarter Sends from Mail, Do Not Disturb, folders for Notes, text selection


1/ Automatically select best account to send from in Mac Mail — Apple Mail received a new feature in Sierra that automatically chooses the best account for you to send a new message from, based on who your email is addressed to and what mailbox and message you had selected when you started composing.
To turn this on (or off) open Mail’s Preferences from the menus at the top. Use the Composing Tab in Mail Preferences to access your settings for sending messages. Under the Composing tab, you’ll see a drop-down next to “Send new messages from.” Pick that to view your options.
You might almost always want to send from your work email address, but if you want to try out letting Apple Mail pick for you, then toggle that drop-down to “Automatically select best account.”

2/ Enable Do Not Disturb in macOS to silence notifications — Notifications can be a mixed blessing. For some they keep the chaos of communications down and allow for rapid response to an email or a Tweet, but for others they can be an annoying distraction.
You can silence notifications until midnight quickly, with a single click. To get that done, option-click (hold down the Option key on your keyboard while you click) on the Notifications icon in the upper-right hand corner of the desktop.
To show that Notifications are muted, the icon becomes greyed out. When the icon is greyed, you can still invoke the Notifications tray by clicking on the icon again — but this won’t un-mute them.
To do so, either pop open the Notifications tray and turn them back on with the toggle, or option-click on the Notifications icon in the menubar again.

3/ Who can and can’t bother you — If you want more precise control over what gets to bother you, delve into the settings of the feature itself.
Select System Preferences from the apple Menu (or from the Dock). In the upper right hand corner of the system preferences, select Notifications. From this menu, most parameters of Notification Center are set. Setting the schedule for notifications to not bother you at all during working hours is a good solution for the easily distracted.
There are other settings here, such as the ability to turn them off when the the display is being mirrored for a presentation, or to allow for a particularly persistent caller to break though your need to not be disturbed.
However, another option to quiet the tumult is to tell the most frequent offender to not pop up a notification. Select whatever app you wish to silence from the left hand column, and turn it off, or pare down when it will yell at you.

4/ Set folders in the Notes app — There aren’t a lot of ways to organize notes in Apple Notes, which became so much more powerful in Yosemite. But you can set folders and subfolders – clock the Elis icon at lower left in the Notes window to create a folder. There’s no obvious way to create a subfolder, but in fact all you do is drag one folder into another.
Keep in mind that if you delete a folder, then all of the subfolders and notes will also be deleted.
(Unfortunately, it’s not possible to create subfolders in iOS Notes.But if you create your subfolders on macOS, and do sync over to iOS.)

5/ Text selection tricks — Clicking anywhere within text in a document places your cursor there for deleting or adding to what you’ve written. While you can click and drag to select text, sometimes this means you miss a few letters. If you want to just select one word, it’s much faster to double-click it.
A triple-click selects the entire paragraph your cursor is on.
More sophisticated still: hold that final click and move your cursor – the selection jumps by full words or full paragraphs each time … no missing letters!