Tag Archives: High Sierra

Five Tip Friday ~ macOS High Sierra offers new features too


1/ How to Enable Type to Siri in macOS High Sierra — Just like in iOS 11, you can enable Type to Siri in macOS High Sierra. This is a feature that lets you type queries to Siri, just like you would a search engine. It’s useful for people who may feel awkward talking to their iPhone or Mac. It’s also helpful in certain situations where silence is a virtue, like in a library. Here’s how to turn in on in macOS.
Open System Preferences, then go to Accessibility. Scroll to the bottom and click on Siri in the left sidebar. You’ll see a checkbox that lets you turn on Type to Siri.
Next, go back into System Preferences and click on the Siri icon. You can enable or disable voice feedback, should you wish.

2/ Check a flight status using Spotlight — High Sierra has made it easier to check the status of a current or upcoming flight. Click on Spotlight’s magnifying-glass icon in the upper-right corner of your screen or press Spotlight’s keyboard shortcut (Command-Spacebar). Now type in the airline and flight number into the search bar that’ll appear.
If you end up with multiple results in the left-hand list, click through them to find the particular flight you’re looking for (and get more information on it).
You can also tell you have got than one result by the little pips at the bottom of the right-hand pane. This indicates you could swipe to view each of the results in turn if you’d rather do that than click them.

3/ Stop videos from auto-playing in Safari — Open Safari and go to Safari>Preferences. Click on the Websites tab, then select Auto-Play from the sidebar. Within this list, you’ll see the websites you currently have open and ones you’ve previously configured auto-play settings for (if any), both with drop-downs next to them:
Allow All Auto-Play – all videos on the site can autoplay.
Stop Media with Sound – only videos that don’t have audio will autoplay.
Never Auto-Play – no videos can autoplay.
Finally, there’s a drop-down at the bottom of that window that’ll allow you to change the global setting.
By default, Safari should stop all media with sound, but if you’d like to be a bit more heavy-handed, you could switch this to Never Auto-Play. Yes!

4/ Set up Custom Reminders — You set a reminder for yourself that repeats on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, or configure one that pops up on the first weekend day of every month, whenever that happens to fall.
Open the Reminders app and click on a blank line to type in the title of your item. Hover your cursor over your new reminder afterward, and you should see a small ‘i’. Click that and you’ll see the options for how you’ll be reminded. To set up a custom repeat, select On a Day, and then click next to the Repeat section. A drop-down menu will offer you a Custom choice. Set a frequency for your repeated reminder: daily, weekly, monthly or yearly. Every frequency type has its own options; for example, weekly lets you pick multiple days of the week on which to get your notifications.
You can do the same thing with Monthly or use the drop-down menus at the bottom to get reminded on, say, the first weekend day of every month. Just click Done to commit.
[Most of these tips, including the one above, came from Melissa Holt at the Mac Observer.]

5/ Use ‘Grep’ to Find Matching Lines — This one’s a bit more pointy-headed. The Terminal doesn’t care if you know what you’re doing, which is why it’s always a great idea to be careful what you type in it! But one command that’s simple to use (at least at its most basic level) is grep. You can use grep to pull lines that contain search terms out of a text file. Here’s how it works: Let’s pretend this text file of mine has many hundreds of lines of data that I need to paw through.
Terminal lives in your Applications>Utilities folder. It gives you a prompt to start (ending with a dollar sign) – type ‘grep test’ (without the the single quotes).
Now you have to tell Terminal which file to run things on. An easy way to do this is by making sure to type a space after your search term, and then drag and drop the file you want to search onto the Terminal window. The program will fill in the path to the file for you,.
If you then press Return on your keyboard, the Terminal window will fill up with the lines that match your search.
There’s a lot more detail, plus pictures, at the Mac Observer.

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High Sierra, 60 tips, Photoshop and Premiere Elements 2018, iStat Menus, stock hauls, Celtic Maps, Microsoft VR moves, Pointillist


Convert your images into Pointillist paintings with AKVIS Points

High Sierra is an upgrade that’s hard to notice — Aside from the new desktop picture, almost every pixel looks exactly the same as in macOS Sierra.
Other than the desktop pictures, you’ll have to look closely to find differences. Many of the biggest changes are under the hood and almost completely hidden from users most of the time.
All of the application and document icons, menu bar icons, and System Preference pane icons look the same as before. You’ll notice very few changes unless you look very closely. It looks, feels, and works pretty much the same as Sierra – here’s a faq about the new file system.

60 Mac Tips Volume 2 — David Sparks and Brett Terpstra have launched 60 Mac Tips, Volume 2. Part of the MacSparky Field Guide series, the new project offers more tips built on the release of Volume 1. They’ve released the book on iBooks for US$20 (NZ$32 – as with most iBooks, hit the Free Sample button to get a free chapter), with 60 screencasts and two hours of video, or you can get a video-only version on Vimeo. The video at the Mac Observer includes an introduction and some free tip excerpts from the book. Subjects include: Siri for the Mac, using the keyboard, Spotlight, Automator, Safari, Mail, Apple Notes, Apple Photos, Terminal Tips, and third-party apps. As with all iBooks, if the book is updated (Volume 1 has been) and you already own it, it will update automatically within the iBooks app.

Adobe debuts Photoshop and Premiere Elements 2018 with focus on computer vision — Adobe has issued the latest versions of its consumer level photo and video editing software, Photoshop Elements 2018 and Premiere Elements 2018, with a slew of fresh features, many of which are powered by all-new content intelligence capabilities.

iStat Menus has weather updates — Weather is a new feature in iStat Menus 6. There’s a pulldown menu, too, among all the other Mac features. iStat Menus costs US$20.70 (about NZ$29), upgrades for existing usersUS$11.49 (about NZ$16).

Apple execs reap more than $19M each in vested stock bonus — Apple’s executive team, including head of retail Angela Ahrendts and SVP of Internet Software and Services Eddy Cue, on Sunday saw batches of performance based restricted stock unit awards, netting each common shares worth more than US$19 million.

Yahoo says all 3B accounts impacted by 2013 data breach — Yahoo in a statement on Tuesday said further investigation into a massive 2013 data breach suggests all 3 billion its user accounts were impacted from the incident, tripling the internet firm’s initial estimates. [That’s all of you, previous Spark account holders.]

Apple Maps vehicles to start touring Scotland & Wales later this month — Apple Maps vehicles will begin collecting street-level data in Scotland and Wales for the first time later in October, according to an updated schedule.

Microsoft partners including Samsung, Dell, Lenovo to launch slew of Windows VR headsets in coming weeks — In its push into the virtual and augmented reality market, which the company has branded as “mixed reality,” Microsoft is leveraging its army of hardware partners, many of whom are releasing new virtual reality headsets over the next few weeks.

AKVIS Points for the Mac lets you turn images into pointillism paintings — AKVIS Points for macOS lets you easily convert images into pointillism paintings. This painting technique is characterized by applying of separate brush strokes in the form of dots or spots. AKVIS Points runs on macOS 10.7 and higher. It’s available as a standalone program and as a plugin filter for Adobe Photoshop, Corel PaintShop Pro, and other image editors. The Home license sells for US$49; a demo is available for download.

AirPort not hacked, iMacs compared, Microsoft exec liked WWDC, eGPU DevKit, High Sierra, Sony content hires, best Mac games, Bob Seger


Amongst the best Mac games so far for 2017 is Obduction, NZ$44.99, called a ‘worthy successor to [the legendary] Myst’ (thanks to Metal and Sierra, this is the best year for Mac games in decades)
Apple AirPort not on latest Vault 7 list of gear susceptible to factory firmware hack by CIA — The latest dump of ‘leaked’ documents from WikiLeaks reportedly from the CIA details the Cherry Blossom firmware modification program, which allowed intelligence agencies to change firmware in a networking company’s factories – but Apple AirPort hardware appears to be unaffected by the effort. [Yeah, babies! The document dump claims that devices from Asus, Belkin, Buffalo, Dell, DLink, Linksys, Motorola, Netgear, Senao, and US Robotics were susceptible to the attack vector.]

Apple’s 21.5″ iMac with Retina 4K display gets dedicated graphics, Kaby Lake — Apple has radically overhauled its iMac lineup for 2017, giving its 21.5 inch Retina 4K models dedicated graphics driven by AMD Radeon Pro 555/560 GPUs; a brighter display with enhanced P3 color; more powerful Intel Kaby Lake CPUs; upgradable RAM sockets; faster SSD drives and modern, ultrafast USB C and Thunderbolt 3 connectivity. The entry level 4K iMac now provides Intel’s 7th Generation Kaby Lake quad-core Core i5 processor, which at 3.0GHz is notably more powerful than the 5th Generation Broadwell Core i5 used in the original “Late 2015” 4K iMac, despite being clocked 100MHz slower.
All of Apple’s 21.5-inch 4K iMac models now have the necessary pixel pushing power of dedicated graphics cards, thanks to the latest refresh. Take a closer look at the updated all-in-one desktop in AppleInsider’s video review. But the 2017 4K, 5K iMacs won’t support Target Display Mode, despite Thunderbolt 3.

Former Microsoft exec had amazing things to say about Apple’s WWDC Keynote — Steven Sinofsky was a Microsoft executive, president of the Windows Division, from mid 2009 to late 2012. He was known for his strong advocacy of Windows everywhere and was responsible for Windows 7 and 8. Today, he’s a board member at Andreessen Horowitz. The tone of an article he penned about WWDC couldn’t be more enthusiastic about Apple’s keynote. It also surfaced evidence of, perhaps, a submerged enthusiasm that one wouldn’t normally expect from a former Microsoft executive.

Apple’s eGPU developer’s kit is promising, but what gets delivered in the future is anybody’s guess — After hammering on Apple’s external GPU developer’s kit for a week, AppleInsider discusses the hardware, the technology, and what needs to happen in the future for adoption of the concept by Mac users.

macOS High Sierra: a video First Look — Video covers several of the marquee features of macOS 10.13 High Sierra.

Apple beefs up unique video content team with pair of Sony programming directors — Apple has hired Jamie Erlicht and Zack Van Amburg, a pair of former Sony Pictures Television executives previously responsible for programming like Breaking Bad and The Goldbergs.

The best Mac games of 2017 (so far) — Ric Molina of MacGamer delivers a detailed post on the best Mac games of 2017. “Here at Mac Gamer HQ, we spend a lot of time talking about how great the gaming situation is on the Mac.” [Among them is the WWII based Day of Infamy, which is appealing to this historian! It also has relatively modest system requirements compared to some.]

Bob Seger on Apple Music — Bob Seger’s iconic music catalogue makes its streaming debut today. The debut includes 12 platinum/multi-platinum albums as well as Seger’s debut album, Ramblin’ Gamblin’ Man.

2017 iMac surprises, High Sierra, GarageBand, European data, Boom 3D, Samsung law change, podcasts


Teardown, testing discover Apple made 2017 iMacs easier for users to upgrade — Apple has made its recently-released iMacs more easily upgradeable, with retailer OWC confirming the base specification 27-inch 5K iMac can be fitted with up to 64GB of RAM, while an iFixit teardown reveals both the memory and the processor used in the 21.5-inch 4K iMac can be removed and replaced.
The customary teardown from iFixit of the 2017 21.5-inch 4K iMac reveals that it too is capable of being upgraded, but not as easily as the 27-inch model. This is a “major win for upgradability” over previous models.
But the RAM is a confusing issue that Mac Observer tries to explain. But the other big surprise is that the Intel Kaby Lake architecture CPU isn’t soldered to the motherboard either. Instead, it’s seated in a standard LGA 1151 CPU socket, meaning the CPU could be upgraded without too much fuss and bother.

Inside macOS 10.13 High Sierra: APFS benefits end users with space, speed — Apple’s next-generation APFS has made its way to macOS High Sierra after an official debut on iOS 10.3, and with it comes essentially instant file copies, better efficiency for greater overall speed and fine-tuning of read and write operations boosting system performance.

GarageBand for Mac update adds Touch Bar support, more virtual drummers — Apple has released an update for GarageBand on Mac, adding Touch Bar support to the music creation software, with other additions including a design refresh to make the audio tool easier to use, three new drummers, and more drum loops to be added to a user’s composition.
Version 10.2 of GarageBand for Mac makes the MacBook Pro Touch Bar more useful for song creation, allowing users to navigate through a project’s timeline, and also play instruments, such as the drums or keyboard. The Touch Bar support arrives just under five months after the same feature was introduced to Logic Pro X in the 10.3 update.

European Union eyeing legislation to give police faster access to tech data — Reuters reports that the European Union wants legislation allowing law enforcement to access a suspect’s data straight from the tech company, circumventing going through the legal system – even when the request crosses country borders.

Global Delight unveils Boom 3D, a surround sound audio app for the Mac — Global Delight has unveiled Boom 3D, a next gen app that builds on Boom 2, its Mac audio enhancement tool. Powered by Global Delight’s patent-pending audio engine, it provides a virtual surround audio experience.
The app also includes handcrafted Equalizer Presets that can pump up any audio in the Mac, advanced Audio Effects and an Intensity controller to customize audio to suit individual listening tastes. Designed for macOS 10.10.3 and later, Boom 3D self-calibrates to the type of Mac it runs on to offer a personalized experience to the users, according to Jason Foodman, president of Global Delight. If you’re an existing Boom 2 user, you can upgrade for a discount off the standard price, so get 3 for about NZ$11 instead of US$16.99.

Samsung: $120 million fine in Apple battle changes patent law — Samsung continues to press the US Supreme Court to review a Federal Circuit ruling that it must pay $120 million for infringing Apple’s smartphone patents, arguing this week the lower court’s decisions in the case dramatically change patent law and will harm innovation, reports the Law360 website.
Meanwhile, Apple still has to pay WARF US$234 million for patent infringement.

Podcasts … Gruber’s Talk Show Live: iMac Pro, and HomePod and Mac NZ’s Mark too — Bryan Chaffin and Jeff share their takeaways from John Gruber’s Talk Show Live interview with Apple senior VPs Phil Schiller and Craig Federighi. They also discuss Apple’s newly announced iMac Pro and HomePod and explore how they’ll fit into our professional and personal lives.
And I did a podcast too, about the Apple releases, with Paul Spain’s NZ Tech Podcast with fellow guest Damian O’Carroll. Y0u can listen to it at that link or find it in iTunes under Podcasts.

Every WWDC announcement, data corruption, new RAM and RAID, awards, Thunderbolt 3 GPUs, High Sierra, Michelle Obama


Every Apple hardware announcement at WWDC — Apple announced a slew of new products Monday, a mix of both hardware and software. It’s a lot to wrap our heads around, so Mac Observer put together this list of all the company’s hardware announcements, with links to more info. Mac Observer also has a list of new software announcements. These are the Macs that will handle High Sierra.

How to protect against Mac data corruption — Robert LeVitus has some great advice.

MacSales.com already has OWC memory upgrade kits with up to 64GB for the new 27-inch iMac — There’s been some confusion over whether or not the new 27-inch iMac will support user upgrades of RAM, with Apple reps giving conflicting answers. So Apple World Today went to the source of RAM upgrades for a lot of users, MacSales.com, and got the definitive word: they’ll be selling OWC memory upgrade kits up to 64GB for the new 27-inch iMac with Retina 5K display.

Promise Technology debuts Mac-Ready Pegasus3 desktop RAID storage solutions — Promise Technology  has added four new models to its lineup of Pegasus desktop RAID storage systems. The new Pegasus3 R4, R6 and R8 models feature more capacity — 16, 36 and 64 (and 80) terabytes (TB), respectively — and bring 40 Gb/s Thunderbolt 3 performance.

Bozoma Saint John is reportedly leaving Apple for Uber — Apple Music exec Bozoma Saint John is leaving Apple to work for Uber, according to TechCrunch, who reportedly confirmed the appointment through multiple sources at Uber [Hope she got good advice before deciding that!].

Apple announces WWDC17 Apple Design Award recipients, and we talked to them about their apps — This years’ Apple Design Awards recipients spanned the globe, ranging from novel games designed by a single developer to larger productions developed across a staff of full time coders and artists.

Official Apple user support for external Thunderbolt 3 GPUs not coming until Spring 2018 — While Apple did announce official support for Thunderbolt 3 eGPU implementations, a footnote nestled deep in the High Sierra preview page declares that user support in a non-beta fashion won’t be available to users until Spring 2018. [Thank you, diligent reader of fine print.]

High Sierra runs on all Sierra-capable hardware, and starts the process to kill 32-bit apps — In a series of sessions at WWDC, Apple amplified that any Mac that is capable of running Sierra can run High Sierra – but a shift away from 32-bit apps will start with the new version of the operating system.

Michelle Obama talks entrepreneurship, social issues, more at WWDC — The second day of Worldwide Developer Conference opened with a conversation with Michelle Obama, former first lady of the United States from 2009 to 2017, and Lisa Jackson, Apple’s Vice President of Environment, Policy and Social Initiatives.

WWDC is here, High Sierra, new iMacs, iMac Pro, updated MacBooks, incredible museum


Apple has previewed an iMac Pro to be available in December

Apple doling out jean jackets plus Metal, iMessage, six-colour logo pins to WWDC attendees – As part of the badge issuance at the 2017 Worldwide Developers Conference, Apple has been giving out custom black denim jean jackets, and an assortment of collectible pins. Developers attending the event started lining up early this morning so they wouldn’t miss out and the line to get in quickly grew to take over the block in front of the McEnery Convention Center in San Jose.

Apple announces support for external graphics cards, virtual reality platforms in macOS High Sierra — Coming this northern autumn as a free upgrade, Apple’s new macOS 10.13 High Sierra platform will include support for external graphics cards over Thunderbolt 3, giving systems enough power to support high-end gaming and popular virtual reality platforms. Apple Insider has a list of all the specifics.

Apple launches speedy new iMacs capable of VR content creation with USB-C Thunderbolt 3 ports — Focused on professional users, Apple has just unveiled a revamped iMac lineup with faster and more capable hardware, which will allow for the creation of graphics-intensive virtual reality content with macOS High Sierra. The new 21.5-inch 4K iMac starts at US$1299 featuring Intel’s Kaby Lake processors. A non-4K model is priced at US$1099. All new iMacs are shipping today. The iMac is also getting Thunderbolt 3, and Fusion Drive standard on all 27-inch models and on high end 21.5-inch models.

Apple previews iMac Pro, the most powerful Mac ever built, coming in December — In a rare pre-announcement intended to appease professional users, Apple offered a sneak preview of the new iMac Pro coming in December, boasting up to 18-core Xeon processors and up to 128GB of ECC memory. It will cost US$4999. [I will have more on this in a separate post.]

Apple also today updated the MacBook and MacBook Pro — They now have the long-awaited faster Kaby Lake processors, added faster SSDs to the 12-inch MacBook and introduced a new US$1299 13-inch MacBook Pro.
The MacBook now features Kaby Lake processors up to 1.3GHz Core i7 with Turbo Boost up to 3.6GHz and up to 50% faster SSD, and supports up to twice the memory.
The updated 13-inch MacBook Pro features Kaby Lake processors up to 3.5GHz Core i7 with Turbo Boost up to 4.0 GHz, and the 15-inch MacBook Pro goes up to 3.1GHz Core i7 with Turbo Boost up to 4.1GHz. The 15-inch MacBook Pro now comes standard with more powerful discrete graphics with more video memory, and the 13-inch MacBook Pro adds a new $1,299 configuration.
Apple also updated the 13-inch MacBook Air with a 1.8GHz processor.
The updated iMac, MacBook, MacBook Pro and MacBook Air are available to order today on Apple.com, and available to buy in Apple Stores starting from Wednesday, June 7th. Additional technical specifications, configure-to-order options and accessories are available online at apple.com/mac.

Incredible private Apple museum opens near Warsaw, Poland — A private Apple museum opened in the small town of Łoś near Warsaw, Poland last Saturday. The exhibition consists mostly of computers and accessories collected by Jacek Łupina. His collector’s passion started with buying an old PowerMac G4. Soon, Łupina started buying other ancient Apple computers and devices, like a Macintosh 128K and its later variants, a Lisa 2/5 with 5 MB hard disk, and a special Woz edition Apple IIGS.