Tag Archives: Reminders

Five Tip Friday ~ Reminders, settings and Time Machine on macOS


1/ Reminders on Macs, iPhones, and iPads help you remember anything — Easy to manage, use, and share; always available, and (best of all), there’s nothing new to buy or learn. You can use your Apple devices to remember everything using just some of the apps and services already installed on your Mac and iDevices: the Calendar and Reminders apps, plus Siri. When you need to remember something, ask Siri (on your Mac, iPhone, or Apple Watch) to remind you of that thing at a specific time and date. The item is then recorded on the Inbox list in Reminders . Then, you’ll be reminded (with an onscreen alert and sound) at the appropriate date and time. Brilliant!

2/ Location-based reminders — Siri knows where you live, so say, “Hey Siri. Remind me to charge the eBike when I get home.” Then, when you arrive at your house, you’ll get an alert on your phone or watch saying ‘Upload your column’ (or whatever). [These two tips came from the Mac Observer.]
But does Siri know where you live? Open the Settings app on your iPhone or iPad.
Scroll down and tap Siri. Tap My Info and select your own contact card.

3/ Enable apps at log-in on macOS High Sierra — If there are certain apps you’ll always use the moment you start up your Mac, you can set them up to automatically log-in via System Preferences in macOS High Sierra (and it’s the same for previous versions of macOS, for that matter).
Go to Users, make sure your own user account is highlighted on the left, then click Login Items. Click the + and you can choose an app, file server or pretty much anything else that should open when you log into, or start up, your Mac. Once you’ve added something, you can use the checkboxes to opt to hide it, though it will still be running in the background, thus instantly available.

4/ Add other notes to the Notes app —You can take the notes that you’ve created in other apps, and import them into the Notes app in macOS Sierra. When you import notes, you can add them to your iCloud notes account or your On My Mac account. If you store them in iCloud, you can automatically see all of your notes on any device where you’re signed in with your Apple ID:
Open your Notes app.
Choose to store your notes in iCloud or On My Mac. Click a folder in the account that you want to use.
In the menu bar, click File > Import.
Select the file or folder that you want to import. If the notes that you’re importing are organized in folders, click Options in the lower-left corner to keep them organized.
Click Import. When you see a confirmation message, click Import again.
After your notes import, you’ll see a new folder in the Notes app called Imported Notes. Then you can organise them into any Notes folder that you want.

5/ Remove a Time Machine backup disk — If you back your computer up to multiple drives using Time Machine, you may be familiar with the notification that tells you that you haven’t been backed up in [insert long amount of time here]. You see, if you’ve configured more than one Time Machine disk, your Mac will take turns backing up to each of them when they’re plugged in or connected over your network; you’ll get the warning when one of your disks hasn’t been used for a while, even if the other backups are working fine.
The solution to that is of course to plug in the missing backup and let it run, but what if you no longer own the drive in question? Or if it failed or got run over by a giant chicken or something? To stop Time Machine from warning you about the lost backup drive, you’ll need to remove it from the preferences on your Mac, which is luckily darned easy. To get going with this and stop those pop-ups, start by clicking Time Machine’s circle-clock icon in your menu bar and picking “Open Time Machine Preferences.”
If you don’t see the circle-clock near the top-right of your screen, you can instead use the Apple Menu to open System Preferences then click Time Machine. Whichever way you get there, though, the Time Machine preference pane has the option to remove a disk under the “Select Disk” button.
Within that section, you’ll find your list of backup disks at the top. Click the one you want to get rid of, and then choose Remove Disk.

Five Tip Friday ~ Checking the weather Reminders, Night Shift Calendar & extra extras


1/ Check the Weather quickly using Spotlight — If you’re curious what the weather is like, you can launch the stock or a 3rd party weather app, sure, or just pull down on a Home Screen page to get Spotlight (device and ’net search) to appear. Type in “weather (and location)” to get the weather report for that spot. You’ll get the details you’re looking for. The same applies to any day within the normal seven-day forecast period. This Spotlight trick works on iPad, too. (It even works on macOS in Spotlight.)

2/ Delete all Reminders in a list — Sometimes, you want to quickly delete all reminders in a list. People use the Reminders app as a catch-all for everything we want to remember, whether it’s work-related or a group of tasks we need to cary out.
Within iOS, there’s a way to delete not only the list, but also all the reminders within that list. This works for things you’ve marked as completed, along with tasks that you haven’t tapped to show them as done. Launch the Reminders app and navigate to the list you want to delete.
Now, tap the Edit button in the top right corner of the app.
Scroll to the bottom (if you can’t see it it) and find the item that says Delete List.
Tap that option and confirm you want to delete all the reminders. (This is a viable on Mac too: secondary click (right- or Control-click) the name of the list and choose Delete. If you are working in iCloud.com, you can go to a Reminders list, click on Options, and then choose Delete. When you delete a Reminders list from one device, that action will take place on every device logged into the same iCloud account.

3/ Night Shift Mode into Staying on All the Time — You can have Night Shift on iOS on all the time if you prefer the softer lighting (it’s more yellowish) of Night Shift mode all the time. Night Shift is most useful after sunset, you may want to have it enabled all the time. This display-based setting makes your screen “warmer,” usually at night, to cut down on blue light exposure which is believed to keep people awake. To get to this setting: Settings> Display & Brightness> Night Shift. The default is to have the mode activate at sunset, and then deactivate at sunrise but you can also set custom start and stop times for the mode.
To keep Night Shift on during the day, you need to set custom hours for the feature. Unfortunately, you can’t set the start and stop times the same so you have to decide on a one-minute time of the day (or night) when it’s okay for the mode to briefly deactivate: for example, Night Shift could temporarily stop at 1:59am. Then, the mode turns back on at 2am.

4/ Set your default Calendar across devices — People can find their Mac set to add events by default to one calendar while their iPhone is adding them automatically to a different one. This can make it seem that iPhone events are colour-coded differently to Mac events, which is confusing.
All your Apple devices that can sync with your iCloud account have a “default calendar” setting that’ll be applied when you don’t specifically change which one you’d like to add an event to. On the iPhone and iPad, this option is listed under Settings > Calendar. On the Mac, this setting is within Calendar > Preferences under the “General” tab.

5/ Dealing with other calendar services — When a device is set to sync to a calendar (say, a Google one) and that particular calendar isn’t even configured on another of that person’s devices, it will make it seem like everything from one device is disappearing. You can check which accounts you’ve got set to sync calendars on the Mac under System Preferences > Internet Accounts.
Any of your accounts that have “Calendars” listed in grey underneath their names are syncing that service with your Mac. Verify that you’ve got the same list turned on for your iPhone or iPad at Settings > Calendar > Accounts.

Extra – The Health app: as Apple Insider puts it in a detailed explanation, the launchpad for all things is the Health Data tab, which lists all of the categories the app can handle. While Activity, Mindfulness, Nutrition and Sleep are front-and-center, others include Body Measurements,  Health Records, Reproductive Health, Results and Vitals. These all break down into numerous subcategories, where the real meat of the app is found. Under “Activity,” for instance, are items like steps, workout duration, and active energy consumption. Tapping on one displays a graph with adjustable views, as well as an explanation, suggested apps, and a set of configuration options.

Extra extra — the logic of iPhone/iPad Force Quitting: The Mac Observer has a detailed description of why and when you may need to do this, and when you should’t worry.

Five Tip Friday ~ iOS 8 and your iPhone/iPad; Reminders and Calendar


1/ Make calls straight from Reminders — Apple’s Reminders app can come in handy on your iPhone, particularly since it’s very easy to create them using Siri. To make a call from Reminders, create a reminder like ‘Call Jo Public at 8am’. Make sure it starts with “call” and that you have the person in your Contacts already.
When you have it set up, it’ll pop up at the right time to remind you. When you see it on your lock screen, put your finger over it and swipe left, and the option to call directly appears if the reminder includes a contact with a phone number even in the lock screen. Now you can save steps when you’re using Reminders to set up phone calls.

The List button on iPhone
The List button on iPhone

list2/ Switch between day and list view — If you tap on a date in Calendar on your iPhone, you’ll get an expanded view of your daily appointments. Scroll up and down to see which hours are free and which are booked, with each event color-coded depending on the calendar it’s assigned to.
In the day view, you’ll find the list button (it looks like a tiny bulleted list, shown above) in the top-right corner of the screen, to the left of the Search field. Tap it, and your upcoming events are arranged in one big, scrollable list (left).
(There’s no list button in the iPad version Calendar—you just have the monthly view, which boasts details for each day’s events.)

3/ See your entire week on your iPhone — The iPad version of the Calendar app has four clearly marked views to choose from: Day, Week, Month, and Year. On an iPhone, the Day, Month and Year views are (relatively) easy to find, but what about the Week view?
Just tilt your iPhone into landscape orientation and your week will twirl into view, no matter which calendar view you were checking.

4/ See event details from the month view — The standard month view in Calendars for iPhone offers a blank, rather unhelpful grid of dates — tap one, and you jump to the expanded daily view. To see the whole month again, you’ll have to tap the Back button. But the Details button, which sits unobtrusively next to the Search button in the top corner of the screen, shows a list of events for the selected date, with the rest of the month still visible. Tap another day of the month, and you’ll see the events for that day. You can even switch months by swiping up and down.

5/ Drag and drop calendar events — The most obvious way to change the time of an event in Calendar is to tap it and edit its “start” and “end” times, but there’s actually a much easier way.
Just tap and hold an event until it pulses, then drag it anywhere you like in your calendar. You can also grab one of the little handles above or below an event to pad it out or cut it short.