Tag Archives: Facebook

The Apocalypticon ~ Lady driver guns, Koreas, May Day, US & data, complaining plants, so do I


Life wasn’t easy for women in the early 20th century, as motorist Dorothy Levitt knew. That’s why she published The Woman and the Car: A Chatty Little Handbook for all Women who Motor or Who Want to Motor in 1909. It tells women how to take care of themselves and their cars, and reminds them to always carry a gun.

Koreas: Honeymoon Island’s dark and bloody past — Nearly 90 flights a day leave Seoul for Jeju, a semitropical island 60 miles off the southern tip of the Korean Peninsula. With citrus groves, dramatic black-rock beaches, and waterfalls spilling into the sea, Jeju has earned the nickname Honeymoon Island. But many vacationers today may not remember the time when it had a very different reputation.
On April 3, 1948, an uprising pitted Jeju islanders against police, the US military and the newly formed South Korean government. In the ensuing conflict, up to 30,000 civilians lost their lives, and those who survived were branded traitors and communists. Nearly 800 historical sites are related to that period. Most are unmarked, untended, and virtually unknown, but one of the most significant is right where thousands of visitors arrive on the island – a mass grave under a runway of Jeju International Airport.
Probing the bowels of what he believed to be North Korean hacking architecture, American cybersecurity researcher Darien Huss found an outlier: iPhone software. It appeared at first glance to be a fairly mundane program, a mobile device management (MDM) tool. Such apps are typically used for businesses to remotely monitor and control employees’ phones. But, according to Huss, it’s most likely one of, if not the only, example of North Korean spyware for Apple’s smartphone.
Satellite analysis shows North Korea’s 2017 nuclear test literally moved a mountain — By combining satellite radar with seismic data, an international team of researchers has reassessed the effects of North Korea’s most recent nuclear test at Mount Mantap, offering disturbing new estimates for the strength of the device used and its influence on the mountain itself. The device could have been 20 times more powerful than the US bomb that was dropped on Hiroshima.

China chose May Day to shame debtors — While labourers all over the world spent May Day marching in the streets and demonstrating for worker’s rights, China’s government spent the holiday shaming citizens with outstanding debts by plastering their faces and personal information on giant screens.

Trump, data and all that — Measuring climate-warming greenhouse gases is crucial, and challenging to measure. In recent years satellite and aircraft instruments have begun monitoring carbon dioxide and methane remotely, and NASA’s Carbon Monitoring System (CMS), a $10-million-a-year research line, has helped stitch together observations of sources and sinks into high-resolution models of the planet’s flows of carbon. So, of course, President Donald Trump’s administration just killed the CMS. [There’s a good reason for this, actually: idiocy.]
It’s almost been a year since the White House held its last big tech summit. This week, it will reportedly host representatives from 38 of the biggest companies in the US to discuss the future of artificial intelligence and how the US government can help avoid disaster. [Good luck with that, as above, You just can’t reason with a powerful, egotistical idiot.]
3500 Russia-linked Facebook and Instagram ads released — Russian operatives used Facebook groups and targeted ads to influence the 2016 US election and sow discord in the United States. Facebook has declined to release the ads to the public, but now Democratic members of the House Intelligence Committee have dropped a data dump of 3500 examples for your browsing pleasure. Be warned they come in a cumbersome PDF format and are split into batches that have to be opened one at a time.
Malicious Google apps get back in Play Store just be changing their names — Malicious Android apps that have been previously reported to Google are showing up again on company’s marquee Play Store with new names, security researchers are reporting. [Reeeal secure, there, Google. But don’t feel too good, Apple users – Signal’s”disappearing’ messages don’t actually evaporate on Macs.]

In slightly lighter news, plants ‘complain’ if neighbours get too close — Plants don’t like to be touched. For these immobile organisms, it means they’re likely growing too close to a neighbouring plant, and that their access to available sunlight is under threat. New research shows that touch-sensitive plants can communicate a warning message to their related neighbours, advising them to adjust their growth patterns accordingly.

And employers think over-50’s are ‘too old to learn new technology’. The good news is I know for a fact they are wrong.

Excerpt from my forthcoming book: The raw, vegan diet of the gorilla requires hours upon hours of eating plants to provide enough calories to support their mass. This can fill 80% of a 12-hour waking day … Humans, thanks to cooking, have many extra hours to devote to, building, helping one another and, let’s face it, chatting and socialising.

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iPhone 7 at 30%, Samsung 7’s demise, AirPods, iOS 10 at 54%, Dropbox, Facebook, Apple Watch ban for UK ministers


UK ministers of parliament have been told not to wear Apple watches at meetings in case 'Russians' are using them to listen in.
UK ministers of parliament have been told not to wear Apple watches at meetings in case ‘Russians’ are using them to listen in.

The iPhone 7 Plus makes up 30% of new model iPhone sales — Survey data from Fiksu indicates that the iPhone 7 Plus now makes up 30% of iPhone 7 sales, the highest percentage ever for the Plus models. The ratio may go even higher for the December quarter.

Samsung Discontinues Galaxy Note 7 manufacturing and sales — This just in: Samsung has officially discontinued manufacturing and sales of the Galaxy Note 7. With repeated incidents of the devices, and replacement devices, catching fire, the company announced on Tuesday it would cease making and selling them. [Well, if you bought one from Spark …]

Apple AirPods: a strategy of ambience and scarcity — UBS financial analyst Steve Milunovich has presented an interesting theory about Apple’s Ambient strategy: “…different input/output methods that can be flexibly utilized depending on the situation (sitting, walking, running, driving). Collectively these devices offer the capability of earlier products … delivered as a seamless user experience.” In addition, the notion of created and evolving scarcity punctuates the Apple strategy.

Official Apple figures peg iOS 10 adoption rate at 54% — Apple this week released the first official statistics on iOS 10 adoption since the OS went live in September, revealing more than half of compatible devices are now running current generation software.

Dropbox gets Messages app, new widget & more for iOS 10 — Later today Dropbox will release a major iOS update, adding features like a new widget and a Messages app for iOS 10, and the beginnings of better multitasking support on iPads.

Facebook launches Slack competitor Workplace with iOS, Android & Web apps — Facebook on Monday officially introduced Workplace, a long-in-testing collaboration tool for businesses and other organizations, aimed at challenging similar offerings from the likes of Slack.

Potential Apple Watch snooping: a not-so-paranoid cyberespionage risk — UK ministers have reportedly been barred from wearing the Apple Watch in sensitive meetings. It sounds paranoid, but the next time you enter a highly confidential meeting, leave your smart watch behind. It’s possible the device could be spying on you. Ministers in the UK have recently been banned from wearing Apple Watches during cabinet meetings on fears that the devices could be hacked by Russian cyberspies, according to The Telegraph.
Earlier this year, researchers found that Apple Watches can be theoretically hacked to record a user’s hand movements, and even steal PIN numbers typed into ATM machines. [Theoretically. So far, the Apple Watch has not become a real target for malware.]

Spaceship Campus, Omnigraffle viewer, 10.10.3 beta, Accessibility bugs, Facebook


AppleCampus

Exclusive March aerial tour of Apple Inc’s Campus 2 shows ‘Spaceship’ Ring, tunnel, theatre progress, more — Apple’s Campus 2 mega-project continues to progress on its Spaceship Ring, where concrete panels are filling out a floor. Tunnels that will connect to parking garages are emerging, the first parking structure is getting its finishing steps before the installation of solar panels. [I bet there’s a bunker somewhere, too.]

Chrome viewer for Omnigraffle — Two years after the release of a free Visio viewer Lucidchart, an online diagramming application, has followed up with the release of a free OmniGraffle viewer.
Anyone can view OmniGraffle (.graffle) files, whether those files are stored locally, online, or sent as email attachments in Gmail.
Users who open a free Lucidchart account can start editing OmniGraffle files online.
Lucidchart is a visual communication platform comparable to OmniGraffle, but it’s cloud-based, meaning that team members can collaborate in real time and access their files on a variety of devices and platforms.

Apple issues new OS X 10.10.3 beta, fixing bug that affected latest MacBooks — Only a few days after the previous build was issued to developers, Apple has provided a new beta of OS X 10.10.3, addressing a crashing bug that affected the newly released 13-inch MacBook Pro.

Do it yourself guide to squashing Accessibility bugs — Apple’s Accessibility Department has a long track record of using customer feedback to drive improvement. Here’s how to add yours.

Facebook clarifies rules for content, including definition of nudity and hate speech — Facebook has released a new version of its community standards, defining in detail what it means by offensive content on issues such as nudity, bullying and hate speech.

Making DVDs from old iMovie projects and slideshows — Glenn Fleishman at Macworld tells you how.

Money for China quake, App count, Reno data, Pages layers, Facebook, podcasts


 

How many apps do you have on your Mac?
How many apps do you have on your Mac?

Apple contributes $1.6 million to Chinese earthquake relief — Apple and China have had a somewhat shaky relationship as of late, with state-run news decrying the iPhone as a threat and rumors of government bans on Apple products (though there seems to be some conflicting reports on this point), but in the wake of China’s 6.5 magnitude quake that hit the country over the weekend, the company is doing its best to help out. As reported by CRIENGLISH, Apple is donating 10 million yuan, or about US$1.6 million, to the relief efforts.

How many apps you have on your Mac — Out of the almost 1100 responses, a majority of readers (38%) said that they had over 500 apps on their iPhones! Comments ranged from “I have 16 apps and I rarely use those” to “I have over a thousand”.
So how many apps you have on your Mac? Although it’s not exactly precise, if we all use the methodology of going into our Applications folder (Finder, Go > Applications, then use the number of items listed as your count) we’ll get a pretty decent idea of just how many (or few) apps the average TUAW reader has installed on his or her Mac. Take TUAW’s poll. [If you can’t see how many at a glance, choose Show Status Bar from the View menu in the finder to turn on the file count along the bottom of the window, pictured above. I have 73, but I had 144 and it was out of control, so last week I erased my Mac, reinstalled the OS and carefully put apps back on that I knew I’d use.]

Apple’s Reno data centre prepares for update — Apple’s data centre near Reno, Nevada is getting an update according to the Reno Gazette-Journal. The paper is reporting that Apple has applied for new building permits for its Reno Technology Park campus.

How to rearrange layered objects in Pages — This comes in handy when you’d like to move text in front of a graphical element, say, or when you’ve got a few objects together and you want to overlap them in a specific order. Check out Melissa Holt’s layered shapes tutorial.

Direct access to Facebook on your Mac desktop — Sometimes, the best utilities aren’t something you necessarily can’t live without, but a little tool that makes your overall computing experience better. Head for Facebook is a tiny little circle that lives on a corner of your screen and, when clicked, reveals the Facebook.com website in a Web view (mobile or desktop), blurring out the rest of your desktop. Another click, and the website disappears. [Or you could choose to get work done.]

Apple fixes podcast downloading, browsing bugs with latest iTunes update — Late last week Apple rolled out the latest version of iTunes with bug fixes in place for updating of subscribed podcasts and episode browsing.
iTunes 11.3.1 addresses two separate podcast handling problems that caused the app to unexpectedly stop downloading new episodes of subscribed podcasts and freeze the program when browsing through podcast episodes in a list.