Tag Archives: Facebook

The Apocalypticon ~ Royal baby, traditions; fat farmers; Infowars, info and wars; Facebook; plague in Mongolia; USA; Climate change; anti-vaxxer pox


Aw, a baby! Even better, a royal baby, born into a family that doesn’t have to do anything apart from act like they deserve it to get loads of tax payers’ dollars. So as a breath of polluted air, Gizmodo ran a story called ‘Here’s How Screwed By Climate Change The UK Will Be When The Royal Baby Turns 18.’
Talking about hallowed old traditions — Eugenics and anti-immigration laws of the past still resonate today, according to journalist Daniel Okrent. He sees echos of the 1924 act in President Trump’s hard-line stance regarding immigration. [I just see recurring short-sighted stupidity, but what do I know?]
Here’s another: farmers are slimmer and fitter than city dwellers — Not so, though. Comprehensively not so: over 1000 researchers representing the Non-Communicable Disease Coalition analysed 2009 studies of more than 112 million adults from 200 countries. The study found that global averages are creeping up for everyone — but faster for rural residents. [I guess riding around all day in a ute or on a quad-bike is not quite the same as old-time farming.]

Sword-missile — Seriously, imagine a drone-fired missile that doesn’t explode, but slices you up instead. It’s real: the RX9 redefines ‘surgical strike‘.

Infowars, info and wars— When you check your Alexa dialogue history, you can see text next to the recordings like “How’s the Weather” and “Set an Alarm.” Amazon lets you delete those voice recordings, but this gives you a false sense of privacy because the company still has that data as text logs of the transcribed audio, with no option for you to delete them. [I love how Zuckerberg and his ilk are now trying to sell you privacy: first they take it away, and then they offer it back as a commodity you can purchase to make them even richer.]
Facebook co-founder says break Facebook up — Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes just published a lengthy and extremely convincing argument for breaking up Mark Zuckerberg’s empire. Hughes warned that Zuckerberg’s power to censor and control speech on the Facebook platform, where the vast majority of the social media activity takes place, along with WhatsApp and Instagram which he also controls (WhatsApp has 1.6 billion active monthly users; Instagram 1 billion), is something that lawmakers should take more seriously. [Jeeze, you reckon?]
Surprise! Uber systematically exploits workers — Studies have repeatedly found that after fees and expenses, Uber drivers make less than minimum wage in major markets. One found that half of all Uber drivers in Washington, DC lived below the poverty line. Meanwhile the CEO took in US$72 million last year. [In NZ, I seriously recommend you switch to Olla and /or Zoomy if you can, which at least keep the profits here.]
AI smart-locks locked people in — Five tenants in Hell’s Kitchen sued their landlord in March after the owners installed a Latch smart lock on the building last year. It is unlocked with a smartphone, and reportedly granted tenants access to the lobby, elevator, and mail room. But the group that sued their landlords saw this keyless entry as harassment, an invasion of privacy, and simply inconvenient. [Latch’s privacy policy indicates that the company collects and stores user information, including someone’s GPS location. In other words, Latch’s ‘privacy policy’ ensures you don’t have any.]
AI gun detection — Tech company Athena Security believes its smart security cameras can prevent attacks like the tragedy in Christchurch, and says it plans to install its AI-powered systems in mosques around the world. [I wish them good luck in Iraq.]

Thousand-year-old part drug kit — Archaeologists in the Bolivian Andes discovered a 1000-year-old ritual bundle that was basically a stash of drug paraphernalia. It contained traces of five different psychoactive substances, including cocaine and the active ingredients found in ayahuasca. [Party like it’s 999 …]

Bubonic plague strikes in Mongolia — In Mongolia, a couple died of bubonic plague on May 1 after reportedly hunting marmots. These are large rodents that can harbour the bacterium that causes the disease.

USA — Infamous Russian agents’ actions described: Newly obtained documents describe what happened when two now-infamous Russians took their outreach campaign into the Treasury Department and the Federal Reserve in 2015.

(IImage from The Atlantic)

Climate change — Ice collapses, world quails, Trump regime cheers: A rational person looking at the collapse of the Arctic as we’ve known it for at least 115,000 years would see an ecological and humanitarian crisis. For the Trump administration, it’s just another business opportunity and chance to peddle climate denial. In sum, Pompeo said that climate change isn’t happenihappiness training happinessng, but also that it is but that’s actually good because it’s melting the Arctic, but also that the US has reduced emissions which is also good … yeah.
Renewable energy stalls — Installations of renewable energy plateaued in 2018 for the first time in nearly two decades of record keeping. Even if it’s just a temporary hiccup, a pause in installations is an extremely worrisome sign about the world’s ambition to address climate change.
But: Britain passed one week without coal power for first time since 1882. 

In good news: anti vaxxer twit gets chickenpox: 18-year-old Jerome Kunkel and his family filed a lawsuit against the health department that banned non-vaccinated kids from attending school. The suit claimed the vaccine violated his religious beliefs because the cell line used as the base of the chickenpox vaccine was derived from foetuses that had been aborted. Now he has chickenpox. [Well, I guess it can’t make him any dumber.]
Finally, you can train yourself 8 points to help you enjoy things: you can be taught to have a more positive attitude. And, if you work at it, a positive outlook can lead to less anxiety and depression.

The Apocalypticon ~ Asia, hunger, Facebook, privacy, Russian internet, measles, Mexico, Nazis, asteroid, military spending, real news, fake meat


Hungry brains — The brain consumes a disproportionately large percentage of a person’s daily energy intake, suggesting cognitive function is tied to nutrition. In countries such as India where many children live below the poverty line, food insecurity – limited access to sufficient safe and nutritious food at home – may reduce children’s learning ability. Scientists in India and the UK warn that food insecurity negatively impacts the learning ability of adolescents in India, with almost half of Indian teens suffering from hunger.
PepsiCo Inc has sued four Indian farmers for cultivating a potato variety that the snack food and drinks maker claims infringes its patent. [There’s your moral rectitude right there.]
Smoking is pervasive and on the rise in Asia, according to an investigation spanning 20 prospective cohort studies from mainland China, Japan, South Korea, Singapore, Taiwan and India. [So if big corporations can’t help starve people to death, give them lung cancer?]

Facebook — Facebook has announced it is banning a number of far-right political figures on its platforms, including InfoWars founder Alex Jones, former Breitbart editor Milo Yiannopolous, and InfoWars contributor Paul Joseph Watson, among a host of others. Leaked internal emails from Facebook had previously described Jones as a “hate figure,” which led users to wonder why he hadn’t been banned sooner. [Zuckerberg hasn’t been banned, though.]
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg reckons privacy is now important. He says he’s committed to turning his company around. Onstage at Facebook’s F8 developer conference, the chief executive said that privacy will be the defining pillar of his social network’s sprawling empire going forward. [Entire world lols. Yeah we all totally trust you, Mark.]
So will he quit? If Zuckerberg wants to prove just how serious Facebook is about guarding user privacy, though, he should it prove it by announcing he’s quitting, says Phillip Michaels.
The dead may outnumber the living on Facebook within 50 years — New analysis by academics from the Oxford Internet Institute (OII) [no, not Oxford Analytica] , part of the University of Oxford, predicts the dead may outnumber the living on Facebook within fifty years, a trend that will have grave implications for how we treat our digital heritage in the future. [So Zuck’s real challenge may be how to make a mint from dead people’s privacy.]

Around the world: Russia wants its own internet — Russian President Vladimir Putin has signed into law new measures that would enable the creation of a Russian national network, able to operate separately from the rest of the world. For now, the network remains largely theoretical though, with few practical details disclosed.
Measles leads to cruise ship quarantine — A cruise ship with nearly 300 passengers and crew was ordered quarantined in the Caribbean port of St. Lucia after a case of measles was confirmed on board, island health officials said Wednesday.
US/Mexican border DNA tests — The US Department of Homeland Security will start using Rapid DNA tests on some asylum seekers at the US–Mexico border next week. The tests are intended to determine whether adults and children who are travelling together are actually family members.
Meanwhile, giant tent structures have been erected in Texas to serve as short-term detention facilities to process a huge influx of families and unaccompanied minors from Central America arriving at the US-Mexico border.
Lost to Nazis — A Jewish family has lost a 15-year legal battle to recover a painting stolen by Nazis during World War II.

Global military spending is continuing to increase — It has grown for the second year in a row and reaching the highest levels since reliable global figures became available in 1988. That’s the finding of a new report out by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute. Total spending is up 76% from the post-Cold War low in 1998.

Asteroid threat — An asteroid slammed down and did away with all the dinosaurs, paving the way for such developments as the human race, capitalism, and posting on the internet: it’s the story we all know and love. Yet if things had shaken out differently – if the asteroid had stayed in its place, and the dinosaurs allowed to proceed with their business – what would things have looked like?Asteroid threat exercise — NASA, FEMA and other national and international agencies are once again gearing up for a hypothetical asteroid impact preparedness scenario. They hope to learn the best strategies for responding to a potential strike, starting from the moment a threatening asteroid is first detected by astronomers.

Biodegradeable plastic bags now biodegrading — Plastic bags that claim to be biodegradable were still intact and able to carry shopping three years after being exposed to the natural environment, a study has found. [‘Compostable’ bags were better, though.]

In good news — In the future, we were promised flying cars and fake meat. While the flying car part hasn’t panned out, fake meat appears poised to make inroads in even Americans’ lives, particularly through fast foods. And in the process, it could end up being a big deal for the planet. [If you honestly want to make a difference, why don’t you consider dropping one meat meal a week?]

The Apocalypticon ~ Climate, Plasticapocalypse, dirt on Trump, Facebook, racist China, UK surveillance, Bots and hackers, Ebola,


Climate — Anticipating accelerating climate change-fuelled disasters in the coming decades, telecommunications giant AT&T recently partnered with Argonne National Labs to build a three-decade model called a Climate Change Analysis Tool to help forecast the devastating impact of climate change on the company’s infrastructure and business on a level that details down to the individual neighbourhood.
Hurricane Maria was the rainiest storm known to have hit Puerto Rico, and climate change is partly to blame, according to a new study.
Snow power — Winters are only going to get more severe, but there’s at least one silver lining as researchers from UCLA have come up with a way to harness electricity from all that snow.

Plasticapocalypse — Amid the rugged peaks of the Vicdessos region of the French Pyrenees, the only visible signs of a human presence are a smattering of villages and the odd hiker or skier; it is considered a pristine environment. But even here, scientists have detected tiny pieces of plastic falling out of the air:  artificial dust.
Planet’s ocean-plastics problem detailed in 60-year data set —Scientists have uncovered the first strong evidence that the amount of plastic polluting the oceans has risen vastly in recent decades — by analysing 60 years of log books for plankton-tracking vessels.
Nestlé has come under fire what advocates say is an outsized contribution to the plastic crisis — So Greenpeace activists hauled a 4.57m-tall heap of garbage, artfully crafted to resemble one of those deep sea fish that’s about 90% jowl, in front of the Nestlé’s US headquarters in Arlington, Virginia.

Dirt on Trump — Mueller Report: The Justice Department has released a redacted copy (c400-page PDF) of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.
Militia messing with US town — Arivaca, Arizona is a tiny village, population about 700, with an outsize problem. Just 18kms (11 miles) from the US-Mexico border, it has become a magnet for self-styled militia groups from out of state that say they want to patrol the border and stop migrants. Their presence has strained the town that has long prided itself on its live-and-let-live, cooperative spirit.

AI to racially profile in China — According to a report from the New York Times, the Chinese government is using facial recognition to track Uighurs, the country’s Muslim minority. The technology reportedly targets this population based on their physical appearance.
And England has surveillance kiosks — A telecommunications company, free Wi-Fi service, police departments and local councils in the UK have developed and deployed a new system that aims to identify suspicious behaviour on free Wi-Fi kiosks in the nation and then automatically block related calls.

Faecesbook — Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg oversaw plans to consolidate the social network’s power and control competitors by treating its users’ data as a bargaining chip, while publicly proclaiming to be protecting that data, according to about 4000 pages of leaked company documents largely spanning 2011 to 2015 and obtained by NBC News. All the while, Facebook was formulating a strategy to publicly frame these moves as a way of protecting user privacy…

Bots and hackers — Bots, in general, are estimated to make up roughly 37.9% of all Internet traffic. In 2018, one in five website requests – 20.4% – of traffic was generated by bad bots alone.
Hackers have stolen data from “several FBI-affiliated websites.” Now details on “thousands of federal agents and law enforcement officers” are floating around on the web.

Latest Ebola not a global health crisis … yet — The outbreak started in August of 2018 and is so far the second deadliest Ebola outbreak in history. As of today, 1206 people have been infected and 764 people have been killed.
It’s the 10th Ebola outbreak in the DRC in the past 40 years and a startling 29% of cases have been in kids under the age of 18.

Good news: will exercise prolong your life? Well, what do you think? High levels of physical activity and longer telomeres do not guarantee a longer life, they definitely increase the likelihood, and runners live on average 3 years longer than non-runners.
And ‘new’ cereals like this might help save the planet.

The Apocalypticon ~ This is America, Around the World in awful ways, bullying, Trump, France, Saudi, Germany, Poland, China, World Bank, Russian Orthodox, robots, data, Facebook, digital hoarding


Bullying and the Trump Effect — Francis Huang of the University of Missouri and Dewey Cornell of the University of Virginia used data from a school climate survey taken by over 150,000 students across Virginia. They looked at student responses to questions about bullying and teasing from 2015 and 2017. The researcher found higher rates of bullying and certain types of teasing in areas where voters favoured Trump.
As federal workers miss their first pay-checks since the partial government shutdown began three weeks ago thanks to Trump’s attempt to ‘govern by tantrum’, frustration, anxiety and anger are rising. As the shutdown continues, it is going to have impacts in the billions of dollars.
Older Americans are disproportionately more likely to share fake news on Facebook, according to a new analysis by researchers at New York and Princeton Universities.
Cancer in America has been beaten back over the 25 years ending 2016, with death rates plummeting, particularly when it comes to the four most common types of the dreaded affliction. If you’re rich.
Too much cheese — The US has a 1.4 billion-pound cheese surplus. The glut is the largest in US history: there is enough cheese sitting in cold storage to wrap around the US Capitol building. [Which currently sounds like a more productive move than what’s going on within the capitol.]

Around the world in awful ways — Last week, public figures in Germany experienced the “biggest data dump” in the country’s history. Following a remarkably swift investigation, authorities say they have obtained a confession from the person responsible. Quieting fears that the doxxing attack against hundreds of politicians was state-sponsored: it appears the culprit is a 20-year-old high school student.
French Yellow Vests take out speed cameras — Members of the “yellow vests” protest movement have vandalised almost 60% of France’s entire speed camera network. The wilful damage is a threat to road safety, of course. The protest movement began over fuel tax increases, and saw motorists block roads and motorway toll booths, but some elements may be linked to right-wing groups.
A Huawei executive has been arrested in Poland on charges of spying for China, Poland’s counterintelligence service has reported.[To misquote Roger Daltry, ‘Huawei, who who, who who?’ The Poles really wanna know.] Meanwhile, the Chinese tech giant has been linked to Syria and Iran.
Saudi Arabia will now notify women by text if they have been divorced. Women in Saudi Arabia, who have long been subjected to a litany of misogynistic restrictions on their behaviour including totalitarian male guardianship laws, will soon receive text messages to inform them of changes to their marital status as part of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s ‘reforms’ of the country’s monarchic government.
World Bank says robots aren’t taking your jobs. Yet. The World Bank has released its annual World Development Report, and the headline news this go round, as relayed by Bloomberg and others, is basically that Robots Aren’t Killing Jobs. Of course, the World Bank isn’t terribly concerned with the quality of jobs, just that they are there.
Cuban ‘sonic weapon’ turned out to be pretty innocent — Since 2017, the baffling case of US diplomatic staff in Cuba and elsewhere who developed symptoms resembling brain trauma after allegedly hearing strange noises (sometimes called Havana syndrome) have spawned plenty of theories of varying plausibility. But it was most likely to be, by jumpy, just crickets! [But hey, at least they got to exercise their paranoia.]
China is letting more than 2000 ethnic Kazakhs drop their Chinese citizenship and leave the country, according to Kazakhstan’s Foreign Ministry. [I guess the alternative is to be persecuted like the Uigurs. Hm, Kazakhstan looks great!]
Russian Orthodox patriarch declares data is the Antichrist —The devil is in the downloads, says Patriarch Kirill of Moscow, the leader of the Russian Orthodox Church. Kirill warned that smart devices like cell phones and social networks could enable the rise of Satan’s chosen and the rule of darkness until the end times. [I thought the Antichrist was just logic, myself.]

Hey, we’ve reached data — Cambridge Analytica’s parent company, SCL Elections, has been fined £15,000 (roughly US$$19,000) in a UK court after pleading guilty to failing to comply with an enforcement notice issued by the national data protection watchdog.
NSA to release reverse engineering tool for free — The US National Security Agency will release a free reverse engineering tool at the upcoming RSA security conference. GHIDRA is a disassembler, a piece of software that breaks down executable files into assembly code that can then be analysed by humans. [Let the wild ruckus begin.]
Samsung users perturbed they can’t delete Facebook — Nick Winke, a photographer in the Pacific northwest, was perusing internet forums when he came across a complaint that alarmed him: On certain Samsung Electronics Co. smartphones, users aren’t allowed to delete the Facebook app. Winke bought his Samsung Galaxy S8, an Android-based device that comes with Facebook’s social network already installed when it was introduced in 2017. He found only an option to ‘disable’ rather than delete.
Digital hoarding is as bad for you as physical hoarding — Emerging research on digital hoarding (a reluctance to get rid of the digital clutter we accumulate through our work and personal lives) suggests it can make us feel just as stressed and overwhelmed as physical clutter. [I’m ruthless with my data, and happy for it … of course, it’s all backed up. But I also keep my computer desktop clear and only two screens of apps on iPad and iPhone.]

The Apocalypticon ~ Trump, Faceplant, Climactic, Hope


Trump’s golf club employed illegals — The Trump Organization employed undocumented immigrants at one of its New Jersey golf clubs, according to a lawyer representing one former and one current employee. [Honestly, is anyone surprised at new hypocrisies to do with the Donald?] Two women, for example, worked in close proximity to Trump both before and after he was elected president.
Flynn trumpets on Trump — Former national security adviser Michael Flynn has provided “substantial” aid in the Russia investigation and beyond [my italics]. And that merits a judge’s consideration at Flynn’s sentencing this month, prosecutors said in court papers.
Only in America? Hundreds of military service members reportedly got caught up in a sextortion scam run by prison inmates using mobile phones, according to a release issued on Wednesday by the Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS).

Faceplant — While we’re in the US, Facebook employees have been using burner phones to talk about Facebook: Facebook’s reputation has only continued to get more sullied in recent weeks, and it’s taking a toll on employees. Things over at the old FB are getting grim, with people now using untraceable ‘burner phones’ to talk about the company. And not even to reporters, just to other employees, according to one former employee. Another described the current scene as a ‘bunker mentality’ after nearly two years of continuous bad press. [You know, like this.]
Sandberg sure as hell knew exactly what Facebook was doing in regards to Soros —
Facebook’s Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg was directly involved in the company’s decision to seek information on billionaire philanthropist and vocal Facebook critic George Soros, the New York Times has reported. Citing people familiar with the matter who requested anonymity to avoid retaliation [you see why Facebook employees might want burner phones?], the Times reported that Sandberg specifically requested information [my italics] on Soros’ financial interests. [It’s always a bad sign when news outlets start selecting the Grinch photos.]
Facial recognition has to be regulated to protect the public, says AI report — The research institute AI Now has identified facial recognition as a key challenge for society and policymakers – but is it too late? It might mean you can unlock your phone with a smile, but it also means that governments and big corporations have been given a powerful new surveillance tool.

Climactic — massive decline of monarchs: Far fewer of the butterflies were heading south this year, and those that have arrived did so a month late, according to Xerces, a non-profit conservation group for invertebrates. One researcher said it was the fewest monarch butterflies in central California in 46 years. Surveyors at 97 sites found only 20,456 monarchs compared to 148,000 at the same sites last year, an 86% decline.
Shocking human-wrought changes to Earth — It’s one thing to know this in the abstract, and another to see global changes laid out in detail, as they are in comprehensive new maps published in the International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation. Developed by geoscientist Tomasz Stepinski and his team at the University of Cincinnati’s Space Informatics Lab (SPI), the intricate visualisations reveal that 22% of Earth’s total landmass was altered between 1992 and 2015, mostly by humans.
Decline in maple syrup — Sugar maple trees need snow to stay warm and grow. Each winter, a deep blanket of snow covers about 65% of northeastern sugar maples. Without this insulating snow, the soil freezes deeper and longer, damaging the trees’ shallow roots. So as climate change reduces the amount of deep snow. a new study says this spells trouble for the trees.
Greenland may one day be a green land — Rising sea levels could become overwhelming sooner than previously believed, according to the authors of the most comprehensive study yet of the accelerating ice melt in Greenland.
Vanishing coaster settlements — Del Mar is a picturesque Southern Californian place; its name means “of the sea,” in Spanish. That’s becoming increasingly true: Del Mar is one of countless coastal communities in California and across the US that is seeing the impacts of climate change and preparing for worse to come.
But we still need to burn coal … right? More than 40% of the world’s coal plants are operating at a loss due to high fuel costs and that proportion could to rise to nearly 75% by 2040, a report by environmental think-tank Carbon Tracker showed on Friday.
Last week, at least 8000 barrels of crude oil gushed into the northern Amazon rainforest in Peru — This created one of the worst spills the region has seen in years. State oil company Petroperú is blaming a local indigenous community for sabotaging a pipeline and triggering the spill, but the leader of Peru’s Wampis Nation, whose members make up that community, denies the accusations.

Hope? Aston Martin announced it’s starting a Heritage EV program where owners of classic Aston Martins can have their cars converted to an all-electric powertrain: The British automaker said it is starting this program so that classic cars don’t get banned from cities that are moving to shun internal combustion engines in favour of boosting air quality for residents. [Yeah, you really want to look after those rich people … the innocent victims in all this … but is there another alternative?]
Free public transport — Luxembourg City, the capital of the small Grand Duchy, suffers from some of the worst traffic congestion in the world. Luxembourg has increasingly shown a progressive attitude to transport. This summer, the government brought in free transport for every child and young person under the age of 20. Secondary school students can use free shuttles between their institution and their home. Commuters need only pay €2 (£1.78) for up to two hours of travel, which in a country of just 2590sq km covers almost all journeys.
But from the start of 2020 all tickets will be abolished, saving on the collection of fares and the policing of ticket purchases. [While getting loads of cars off the roads.]

The Apocalypticon ~ Quakes, food, water, temperatures, shocks and planet Earth, energy conundrum, better food, people, politics, power, TB, Amazon, Google, Facebook, unions, vanilla Apple


The planet — Powerful earthquakes struck along the western coast of the Indonesian island of Sulawesi on Friday 27th September, triggering a tsunami that reportedly caused damage in two cities. The US Geological Survey said it was a 7.5 magnitude quake just six miles deep. It hit a sparsely populated area in the early evening. The epicenter was about 50 miles north of Palu.
Trump’s administration admits to temperature rise — Last month, deep in a 500-page environmental impact statement, the Trump administration made a startling assumption: on its current course, the planet will warm a disastrous 4°C (7° degrees Fahrenhei) by the end of this century. But the administration did not offer this dire forecast, premised on the idea that the world will fail to cut its greenhouse gas emissions, as part of an argument to combat climate change. Just the opposite: the analysis assumes the planet’s fate is already sealed.
Roundup’s killing the bees — A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by scientists at the University of Texas at Austin posit that glyphosate – the active ingredient in the herbicide – destroys specialised gut bacteria in bees, leaving them more susceptible to infection and death from harmful bacteria. [And it’s linked to cancer in humans.]
Human activity wobbles the Earth — When looking at the Earth from afar it appears to be a perfect sphere, but that actually isn’t the case. Because Earth isn’t uniform on all sides due to land masses that shift and change over time, the planet actually wobbles a bit when it spins. Now, a new study by researchers with NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and several universities and science centres has pinpointed the causes of Earth’s imperfect spin, called ‘polar motion’ and they found that humans are contributing to it.
Human activity shocked space — Humans barely touch on space, you know, apart from staring at it a lot, ringing the planet in space trash and sending objects crashing into other planets and asteroids … or do they? As if the devastating effects of bombs dropped on European cities during the Second World War weren’t terrible enough, a surprising new study shows that the shockwaves produced by these bombing raids reached the edge of space, temporarily weakening the Earth’s ionosphere.
Healthy food, healthy planet? As sales of plant-based proteins rise, there’s growing awareness of the ecological footprint of beef production. Who knew it could take about 190 litres (50 gallons) of water to produce a 100 gram hamburger? More sustainable eating choices are better for the planet.
Clean energy means more intensive, planet-imaging mining — The irony of transitioning to clean energy is we’re going to have to mine the crap out of the Earth to do it. Much like our computers and smartphones, wind turbines and solar panels are high-tech devices whose production demands a smattering of metals and minerals from across the periodic table and the planet.

Politics, unions, people and ‘governance’ — There is a pattern not only in North America and not only in Europe but also in Asia of assaults on democracy, of a new way of using social media to undermine democracy, of new ways of conceiving of political parties as authoritarian political parties. And it’s repeating itself all over the world.
And Trump tries to obscure the Russian mirror with Chinese smoke — President Trump accused China of trying to interfere in upcoming US midterm elections because of the hard line he has taken on trade, airing the claim as he opened Wednesday’s meeting of the UN Security Council in New York. [This is a purely political move that’s technically referred to as ‘an outright lie’ by any reasonable human.]
Amazon Inc guns for unions — Amazon, the US’ second-largest employer, has so far remained immune to any attempts by US workers to form a union. With rumblings of employee organisation at Whole Foods – which Amazon bought for $13.7 billion last year – a 45-minute union-busting training video produced by the company was sent to Team Leaders of the grocery chain last week.
In ‘good’ company … Google parent Alphabet and the other four dominant US technology companies – Apple, Amazon, Microsoft, and Facebook – are fast becoming industrial giants. They spent a combined $80 billion in the last year on big-ticket physical assets, including manufacturing equipment and specialised tools for assembling smart phones and powerful computers and even undersea internet cables. Why? So nobody else can compete.

TB or not TB — A cure for TB has been widely available since the 1950s, yet TB is still the deadliest infectious disease on earth. It kills about 1.5 million people each year, or 4000 people each day, including 600 children. It kills more people than HIV or car accidents. So why don’t we end TB?
Young blood for New Yorkers — Ambrosia [why not ‘Vampyria’, you may wonder?], the startup that injects the plasma of young people into those 35 and older, is looking to open up shop in New York City.

Vanilla-beige Apple RFB media — Apple’s new streaming service reportedly has a $US1 ($1.37) billion budget, but apparently it can’t buy some nerve. The company has long censored its walled-garden offerings on platforms like the App Store, and per a report in the Wall Street Journal, Apple is still aiming to keep its content offerings squeaky clean, with little “gratuitous sex, profanity or violence.” [Also known as ‘RFB’, or ‘really f___king boring’, programming that’s about as edgy as a blancmange.]

The Apocalypticon ~ Facebook, Trump and our world of pain


Facebook is now rating its users on the ‘trustworthiness’. [You now, coz we all trust everything Facebook does.] Facebook hasn’t been shy about rating the trustworthiness of news outlets, but it’s now applying that thinking to users as well.
Meanwhile, the world’s dominant social network has now been strongly linked with more attacks on refugees in Germany. [Now that’s something I do trust about Facebook.]
Apple has removed Facebook’s Onavo security app from the App Store because it violated the company’s privacy rules. Apple officials told Facebook that Onavo violated the company’s rules on data collection by developers.

Trump — Finger-on-the-pulse US ‘President’ Donald Trump then accused social media companies of silencing “millions of people in an act of censorship – of course, without offering evidence to support the claim. [So, don’t silence racists?]
What does it take to impeach a US President? Good question. Ron Elving of NPR has looked at former President John Tyler in the 1840s leading up to the House impeachment of former President Bill Clinton in 1998.
Encrypted apps didn’t work for Cohen — Former, and now convicted, Trump lawyer Michael Cohen was apparently a fan of encrypted communications apps like WhatsApp and Signal, but those tools failed to keep his messages and calls out of sight from investigators. Prosecutors said in a court filing the FBI had obtained 731 pages of messages and call logs from those apps from Cohen’s phones.
Trump also set out to defend Cohen’s payments to women Trump had slept with out of wedlock. [Here are three words that describe how this went: Bull. China shop.]
Trump wants racists uncensored, but he also wants more Americans dying — The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) just proposed a rule that would, by its own admission, result in more Americans getting sick and dying. And the whole reason we know that is because of landmark public health studies the Trump administration is trying to limit access to.
The Trump administration just released a new rule proposal at the centre of its environmental deregulatory frenzy. The long-anticipated rule would replace the Clean Power Plan, an Obama era initiative to rein in pollution from coal-fired power plants that was considered the former president’s signature policy for combatting climate change.
Orange is the new black — Inmates at prisons across the US are expected to stage a weeks-long strike to demand better living conditions and prison reform. [Oh no, what will this do to the slave economy?!]

World of pain — A folder containing an estimated 14.8 million Texas voter records was left on an unsecured server without a password. Considering Texas has 19.3 million registered voters, this leak is very substantial. The file was discovered by a New Zealand-based data breach hunter who goes by the pseudonym Flash Gordon; the data appears to have been compiled by a company working for the Republicans.
But personal data has become widely available in China and can be scooped up for pennies by insurance companies, banks, loan sharks, and scammers alike, according to sellers and financiers interviewed by Reuters.
Hackers linked to Russia’s government tried to target the websites of two right-wing US think-tanks. This suggests they were broadening their attacks in the build-up to November elections, Microsoft said. The software giant said it thwarted the attempts last week by taking control of sites that hackers had designed to mimic the pages of The International Republican Institute and The Hudson Institute. [Russia doesn’t need to put a distinct government in place it the US, it just seeks to destabilise the US as much as possible … imagine Putin’s glee when Trump got in!]
In troubled, desperately poor and already-overcrowded Bangladesh, Rohingya refugees would rather cope there than go back to Burma. [Buddhism is such a peace loving religion, right?]Robots to take English jobs — The chief economist of the Bank of England has warned that the UK will need a skills revolution to avoid “large swathes” of people becoming “technologically unemployed” as artificial intelligence makes many jobs obsolete. [Presumably the new jobs will involve robot dismantling?]
China wants to clean the ’net — The internet must be “clean and righteous[you know, just like Xi Jinping’s government] and vulgar content must be resisted in the field of culture, Chinese President Xi Jinping told a meeting of senior propaganda officials.
Australia will take your phone and imprison you if you don’t unlock it — The Australian government wants to force companies to help it get at suspected criminals’ data. If they can’t, it would jail people for up to a decade if they refuse to unlock their phones.
US woman sues US for taking her phone — An American woman who had her phone seized by border agents as she returned home to the United States is suing the country’s border protection agency.
Australia bans Huawei, ZTE from supplying 5G technology — Australia has blocked Huawei and ZTE from providing equipment for its 5G network, which is set to launch commercially next year. [Oh, what, don’t you want a ‘clean and righteous’ network, Australia?]
Even the old, ‘solid’ ice is now breaking up — A huge pack of floating ice along the northern Greenland coastline is breaking up and drifting apart into the Arctic Ocean – another consequence, scientists say, of global warming caused by the buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.
Talking about the world, tiny plastic is everywhere — Ecologist Chelsea Rochman at the University of Ontario has found it in fish tissue from all over the world … and even in drinking water and beer!
European ‘hunger stones’ — A lengthy drought in Europe has exposed carved boulders known as hunger stones that have been used for centuries to commemorate historic droughts – and warn of their consequences.
UTI superbugs are spreading outside hospitals — The bacteria that cause urinary tract infections are not only becoming more resistant to antibiotics, suggests a recent study published in the Annals of Emergency Medicine, but they’re starting to spread outside of hospitals. It’s another sign of increasing antibiotic resistance.
Even the occasional drink is harmful to health, according to the largest and most detailed research carried out on the effects of alcohol — The study suggests governments should think of advising people to abstain completely. The uncompromising message comes from the authors of the Global Burden of Diseases study, a rolling project based at the University of Washington, in Seattle, which produces the most comprehensive data on the causes of illness and death in the world. [Gah!]

And finally, some good news … OK, not really, but at least you might be able to have fun with it. We’ve seen a lot of machine learning systems create strange new phrases and dreamlike images after being trained on large amounts of data. But a new website lets you do the generating, and the results are just as bizarre as you’d expect. [Crikey.]

OK, well, this sounds more positive (excerpt from my forthcoming book): “The fact that we have come so far, despite very real and growing threats to our existence and even to the planet we live on, is testimony not to the worst side of humanity, but to the best, despite the creative and oftentimes effective destructive efforts of the more regrettable among us.”

The Apocalypticon ~ World, Trump, Russia, moles, gnats, Twitter, Facebook, mouths


Nuclear power plants in Europe have been forced to cut back electricity production because of warmer-than-usual seawater. Plants in Finland, Sweden and Germany have been affected by the heat wave that has broken records in Scandinavia and the British Isles and exacerbated deadly wildfires along the Mediterranean.
Common food additives could have ‘lifelong’ health consequences, a US paediatrician group has warned.
US fascist eyes Europe: Steve Bannon built his career on right-wing politics inside the United States but now he’s taking on a new frontier: the European Parliament. He’s optimistic about uniting Europe’s right wing across its national boundaries. [Sorry, is ‘fascist’ too strong? How about Nazi, then, Steve?]
The doom of the ancient Cambodian city of Koh Ker may have been the result of bad engineering – plus some bad karma, baby.

The US — House Speaker Paul Ryan on Tuesday downplayed a threat by President Trump to revoke security clearances for a number intelligence officials who served under President Barack Obama as “trolling” and not a political act. [In this case, clearly, the trolling is a political act.]
Facial recognition technology made by Amazon, which is being used by some police departments and other organizations, incorrectly matched the lawmakers with people who had been arrested for a crime, the American Civil Liberties Union reported.
President Trump resumed acknowledging Russian election interference but said he fears that this year, it will benefit Democrats. [Right, because it’s clearly done wonders for them so far.]
Facebook is reportedly rolling out its ‘downvote’ button to a wider group of users in the United States. The feature began appearing on the service’s mobile app without a formal company announcement. The feature appears to currently be limited to public posts. Should your account be flagged for this week’s test, every comment in a thread will include a numeric value and small up- and down-arrows connected to that number. Other territories, particularly Australia and New Zealand, have seen wider downvote tests since April of this year. [That’s right, Facebook, get the users to do your work for you.]
And here’s new US hobby – destroying the lives of complete strangers. [Trump likes this one too, you know, putting those immigrant kids into cages.]
Gnats spreading disease — A disease spread by sandflies seen as an exotic nuisance in the US might not be solely a traveller’s disease after all. A new study suggests most American cases of leishmaniasis are actually spread by native bugs, not caught while travelling. And thanks to climate change, the parasitic illness may become even more common in the years to come.
Twitter shares fell 21% as the company reported that user growth had turned negative, even as its quarterly results beat Wall Street expectations. The decline was even greater than Facebook’s almost 19% plunge in shares after the social media giant reported disappointing results. [Oh. Gosh. Boohoo. Anyway, it’s something to share and tweet about …]

Russia — Russian hackers have broken into supposedly secure, “air-gapped” or isolated networks owned by US utilities with relative easy by first penetrating the networks of key vendors who had trusted relationships with the power companies,” The Wall Street Journal has reported, citing officials at the Department of Homeland Security.
Maria Butina’s story may point to a Russian effort, years in the making, to give the Kremlin influence in the US by connecting with American gun enthusiasts and religious conservatives, an effort that’s had a ‘surprising degree of success’. [Hardly surprising. But no doubt Trump will try and shoot this theory down.]

And finally, some good news — scientists have figured out how our mouths heal so fast. [Although the voluntary 3-metre wounds sound a little harsh – that was three millimetres, I suspect, Gizmodo copy editor!]

Excerpt from my forthcoming book: “In the present day, we might consider ourselves rugged individualists but we have libraries at our disposal, and we use roads, social services and communications networks all built by combined effort for our mutual benefit.”

The Apocalypticon ~ The rich will eat us, facial recognition, surveillance, Google, Facebook, jobs, data breaches, all-time heat records


Yes, hello, I’m back from a  three-week holiday, sorry about that folks, but sometimes I just have to have a break. Still, the world keeps churning …
The wealthy are plotting to leave us behind, writes Douglas Rushkoff, describing what he learned from a high-paying speaking gig about the future of technology for “five super-wealthy guys…from the upper echelon of the hedge fund world.”The Event was their euphemism for the environmental collapse, social unrest, nuclear explosion, unstoppable virus or Mr Robot that takes everything down. They knew armed guards would be required to protect their compounds from the angry mobs. But how would they pay the guards once money was worthless? What would stop the guards from choosing their own leader…? This is the possible Survival of the Richest.
A new paper from the Center for Global Development says we are spending too much time discussing whether robots can take your job and not enough time discussing what happens next
Facial recognition ad surveillance — After all the concern, British Police have admitted no one was arrested during a trial of controversial facial recognition technology, which sparked privacy and human rights concerns.
But you can beat it. Die-hard fans of the rap group Insane Clown Posse have become accidental heroes for people concerned about facial recognition tech: according to Twitter user @tahkion, a computer science blogger for WonderHowTo, Juggalo makeup outmatches the machine learning algorithms that govern facial recognition technology.
One of many futuristic ideas Walmart has sought to patent is worker surveillance tech that ‘listens’ to them. There’s no guarantee that Walmart will ever build this technology, but the patent shows the company is thinking about using tech not just to facilitate deliveries or make its warehouses more efficient, but also to manage its workforce, which is the largest in the United States. [I prefer to call it ‘Apallmart, myself.]
Two privacy-focused organizations have accused German police of carrying out raids at their offices and members’ private homes on some pretty shoddy reasoning that makes no sense and hints at the police’s abuse of power. [Police abusing over? N-e-v-e-r…]

Jobs — Microsoft may move jobs abroad since Trump’s policies stop it finding the right workers: The Trump Administration’s tough stance on immigration has attracted a lot of criticism from big technology firms, which rely heavily on skilled foreign workers from around the world. Smith previously spoke out against efforts to stop the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program – an Obama-era policy that provides legal protection for young immigrants brought to the US illegally as children. Microsoft has advocated the protection of DACA and more broadly supported immigration as a way to make sure US companies are hiring talented people. [The problem with DACA is simply Obama’s touch as far as the sensitive bully that Trump is concerned – but worthiness has never been a sop to him cutting off his orange nose to spite his orange face.]

Once more into the (data) breach – and hacks: The information operatives who worked out of the Internet Research Agency in Saint Petersburg, Russia did not stop at posing as American social media users or spreading false information from purported news sources, according to new details. They also created a number of Twitter accounts that posed as sources for Americans’ hometown headlines.
And another for the curse that is Google: According to The Wall Street Journal, hundreds of app developers have access to millions of inboxes belonging to Gmail users. The developers reportedly receive access to messages from Gmail users who signed up for things like price-comparison services or automated travel-itinerary planners. Some of these companies train software to scan the email, while others enable their workers to pore over private messages. [Honestly, Gmail users, do you need any more reasons not to use Google services? OK, here’s another …]
A user on Medium named Punch a Server says you should not use Google Cloud due to the no-warnings-given, abrupt way the plug is pulled on your entire system if they (or the machines) believe something is wrong. The user has a project running in production on Google Cloud (GCP) that is used to monitor hundreds of wind turbines and scores of solar plants scattered across 8 countries.
Apple is more secure, you know? And the free iCloud email that every Apple user can have FOR FREE is end-to-end encrypted by default. Apple just released iOS 11.4.1, and while most of us are already looking ahead to all the new stuff coming in iOS 12, this small update contains an important new security feature: USB Restricted Mode. Apple has added protections against the USB devices being used by law enforcement and private companies that connect over Lightning to crack an iPhone’s passcode and evade Apple’s usual encryption safeguards.

IBM and the cost of data breaches — IBM Security has released a report examining the costs and impact associated with data breaches. The findings paint a grim portrait of what the clean up is like for companies whose data becomes exposed – particularly for larger corporations that suffer so-called mega breaches, a costly exposure involving potentially tens of millions of private records.
Fracking companies use Facebook to ban protests — Facebook is being used by oil and gas companies to clamp-down on protest. Three companies are currently seeking injunctions against protesters: British chemical giant INEOS, which has the largest number of shale gas drilling licenses in the UK; and small UK outfits UK Oil and Gas (UKOG), and Europa Oil and Gas. Among the thousands of pages of documents submitted to British courts by these companies are hundreds of Facebook and Twitter posts from anti-fracking protesters and campaign groups, uncovered by Motherboard in partnership with investigative journalists at DeSmog UK. They show how fracking companies are using social media surveillance carried out by a private firm to strengthen their cases in court by discrediting activists using personal information to justify banning their protests.

All-time heat records have been set all over the world during the past week — So reports the Washington Post in the article Red-Hot Planet which was updated throughout the week with new all-time heat records.
From the normally mild summer climes of Ireland, Scotland and Canada to the scorching Middle East to Southern California, numerous locations in the Northern Hemisphere have witnessed their hottest weather ever recorded over the past week… [I know, as I was just in Canada – over 30°C for seven days in a row, who would have thought?]

And the good news? I had a break! A real break! But I’m back! (But goodness, isn’t it cold in New Zealand?!)

The Apocalypticon ~ Tech support, people, nature, Cheese Zombies, water


‘Tech support’ — A team of scammers recently sneakily filmed dozens of Australians by remotely accessing their webcams, then uploaded those videos onto YouTube, according to Australian news outlet ABC.
Unfortunately for customers of MyHeritage, a genealogy and DNA testing service, a researcher uncovered 92 million account details related to the company sitting on a server, according to an announcement from MyHeritage. The data relates to users who signed up to MyHeritage up to and including October 26, 2017 – the date of the breach.
Journalist’s data seized — According to The New York Times, the Department of Justice seized a New York Times reporter’s phone and email records this year in an effort to probe the leaking of classified information, the first known instance of the DOJ going after a journalist’s data under President Trump, according to The Hill. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced last year the DOJ had tripled the number of leak investigations it was conducting compared to the number under the Obama administration, which had already prosecuted more leak cases than all other administrations.
Zuckerberg grilled at angry shareholders meeting — One investor compared the social network’s poor stewardship of user data to a human rights violation. Another warned that scandal is not good for Facebook’s bottom line, and one advised Chief Executive Officer Mark Zuckerberg to emulate George Washington, not Vladimir Putin, and avoid turning Facebook into a “corporate dictatorship.”
Apple set on ‘jamming’ Facebook — The next version of iOS and macOS will frustrate tools used by Facebook to automatically track web users. At the company’s developer conference, Apple’s software chief Craig Federighi said, “We’re shutting that down,.” He added that Safari – you know, the FREE SECURE BROWSER ON EVERY APPLE DEVICE (see below), would ask owners’ permission before allowing the social network to monitor their activity.
Apple also declared war on ‘browser fingerprinting‘.
Why you should ditch Chrome —
 Unlike Chrome, Firefox is run by Mozilla, a nonprofit organisation that advocates for a ‘healthy'” internet. Its mission is to help build an internet in an open-source manner that’s accessible to everyone – and where privacy and security are built in. Contrast that to Chrome’s privacy policy, which states that it stores your browsing data locally unless you are signed in to your Google account, which enables the browser to send that information back to Google … [Honestly, the amount of Apple users I have met who insist on using Chrome as a browser and worse, Gmail accounts when there’s privacy-protecting Safari on every Mac and Apple device already, and secure, encrypted free iCloud email! Grrr! Bloody madness!]
Psychopathic AI — A team of researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology created a psychopathic algorithm named Norman, as part of an experiment to see what training artificial intelligence on data from “the dark corners of the net” would do to its world view. Unlike most “normal” algorithms by AI, Norman does not have an optimistic view of the world. [I almost wish that was running the US instead of Trump – at least there’d be some logic to it.]
Chinese government hackers have compromised the computers of a US Navy contractor, stealing massive amounts of highly sensitive data related to undersea warfare – including secret plans to develop a supersonic anti-ship missile for use on US submarines by 2020, according to American officials. The breaches occurred in January and February, the officials said, speaking on the condition of anonymity to discuss an ongoing investigation.
At least five cryptocurrencies have recently been hit with an attack in the last month– one that used to be more theoretical than actual.
Carbon bubble burst will hurt — The existence of a “carbon bubble” – assets in fossil fuels that are currently overvalued because, in the medium and long-term, the world will have to drastically reduce greenhouse gas emissions – has long been proposed by academics, activists and investors. A new study published in the journal Nature Climate Change shows that a sharp slump in the value of fossil fuels would cause this bubble to burst, and posits that such a slump is likely before 2035 based on current patterns of energy use.

People — More than 50,000 union workers in Las Vegas are set to go on strike if new contracts are not settled and at the top of the list of concerns for the Culinary and Bartenders Unions is protection against robot replacements.
Suicide rates are up by 30% across the US — Amidst all the name calling and straw man arguments about the overall health of America, sometimes it helps to look at data from people who sacrificed everything based on their perception of reality. Whatever politics you subscribe to, the feeling of hopelessness is evidently real, and frightening. Suicide rates are up by 30% across the nation since 1999, federal health officials have reported.
Opioids caused 1 In 5 deaths of young people in the US in 2016 — A new study published by JAMA Network Open highlights just how devastating the crisis has been to certain age groups. In 2016, it found, opioid overdoses were responsible for a fifth of all deaths among people in their mid-20s to 30s — a fivefold increase from 15 years ago.

Nature — Biggest iceberg ever set to break up: the  iceberg is so large that even smaller chunks of it were behemoths in their own right. By 2014, the largest remnant was B-15T, which was so thick it kept running aground. One of those last-made icebergs, B-15Z, may now be nearing the end of its life. At the end of May 2018, the International Space Station crew captured an image of B-15Z that showed a crack running right down its middle. It’s ten miles by 5!
How microbes survive in ‘sterile’ spacecraft — Rakesh Mogul, a Cal Poly Pomona professor of biological chemistry, was the lead author of an article in the journal Astrobiology that offers the first biochemical evidence explaining the reason contamination persists. The research team analyzed several Acinetobacter strains that were originally isolated from the Mars Odyssey and Phoenix spacecraft facilities, finding that under very nutrient-restricted conditions, most of the tested strains grew on and biodegraded the cleaning agents used during spacecraft assembly …
Asteroid strikes Africa soon after it was detected — A meteor lit up the sky over Botswana, Africa, early Saturday evening local time. Scientists discovered the 2m-wide asteroid just hours before it reached – and struck – Earth.
Hurricanes are slowing down and that’s a bad thing. The pace at which hurricanes move across the planet is slowing, according to new research. This suggests Hurricane Harvey, which stalled over Texas last year, may not have been an anomaly, and that highly destructive, slow-moving tropical storms are becoming more common.

Finally, some good news: Cheese Zombies! In the late 1950s, a school district in Washington’s Yakima Valley received an excess of subsidized cheese. Faced with the abundance of dairy, the food services supervisor (or, by other accounts, a local cafeteria cook) invented a new sandwich that soon appeared on cafeteria menus: the Cheese Zombie.

Excerpt from my forthcoming book: “There’s more to water than meets the eyes, of course. Cities like London, New York and Moscow have entire teams and systems dedicated to pumping water away from underground systems built deep underground.”

The Apocalypticon ~ Lady driver guns, Koreas, May Day, US & data, complaining plants, so do I


Life wasn’t easy for women in the early 20th century, as motorist Dorothy Levitt knew. That’s why she published The Woman and the Car: A Chatty Little Handbook for all Women who Motor or Who Want to Motor in 1909. It tells women how to take care of themselves and their cars, and reminds them to always carry a gun.

Koreas: Honeymoon Island’s dark and bloody past — Nearly 90 flights a day leave Seoul for Jeju, a semitropical island 60 miles off the southern tip of the Korean Peninsula. With citrus groves, dramatic black-rock beaches, and waterfalls spilling into the sea, Jeju has earned the nickname Honeymoon Island. But many vacationers today may not remember the time when it had a very different reputation.
On April 3, 1948, an uprising pitted Jeju islanders against police, the US military and the newly formed South Korean government. In the ensuing conflict, up to 30,000 civilians lost their lives, and those who survived were branded traitors and communists. Nearly 800 historical sites are related to that period. Most are unmarked, untended, and virtually unknown, but one of the most significant is right where thousands of visitors arrive on the island – a mass grave under a runway of Jeju International Airport.
Probing the bowels of what he believed to be North Korean hacking architecture, American cybersecurity researcher Darien Huss found an outlier: iPhone software. It appeared at first glance to be a fairly mundane program, a mobile device management (MDM) tool. Such apps are typically used for businesses to remotely monitor and control employees’ phones. But, according to Huss, it’s most likely one of, if not the only, example of North Korean spyware for Apple’s smartphone.
Satellite analysis shows North Korea’s 2017 nuclear test literally moved a mountain — By combining satellite radar with seismic data, an international team of researchers has reassessed the effects of North Korea’s most recent nuclear test at Mount Mantap, offering disturbing new estimates for the strength of the device used and its influence on the mountain itself. The device could have been 20 times more powerful than the US bomb that was dropped on Hiroshima.

China chose May Day to shame debtors — While labourers all over the world spent May Day marching in the streets and demonstrating for worker’s rights, China’s government spent the holiday shaming citizens with outstanding debts by plastering their faces and personal information on giant screens.

Trump, data and all that — Measuring climate-warming greenhouse gases is crucial, and challenging to measure. In recent years satellite and aircraft instruments have begun monitoring carbon dioxide and methane remotely, and NASA’s Carbon Monitoring System (CMS), a $10-million-a-year research line, has helped stitch together observations of sources and sinks into high-resolution models of the planet’s flows of carbon. So, of course, President Donald Trump’s administration just killed the CMS. [There’s a good reason for this, actually: idiocy.]
It’s almost been a year since the White House held its last big tech summit. This week, it will reportedly host representatives from 38 of the biggest companies in the US to discuss the future of artificial intelligence and how the US government can help avoid disaster. [Good luck with that, as above, You just can’t reason with a powerful, egotistical idiot.]
3500 Russia-linked Facebook and Instagram ads released — Russian operatives used Facebook groups and targeted ads to influence the 2016 US election and sow discord in the United States. Facebook has declined to release the ads to the public, but now Democratic members of the House Intelligence Committee have dropped a data dump of 3500 examples for your browsing pleasure. Be warned they come in a cumbersome PDF format and are split into batches that have to be opened one at a time.
Malicious Google apps get back in Play Store just be changing their names — Malicious Android apps that have been previously reported to Google are showing up again on company’s marquee Play Store with new names, security researchers are reporting. [Reeeal secure, there, Google. But don’t feel too good, Apple users – Signal’s”disappearing’ messages don’t actually evaporate on Macs.]

In slightly lighter news, plants ‘complain’ if neighbours get too close — Plants don’t like to be touched. For these immobile organisms, it means they’re likely growing too close to a neighbouring plant, and that their access to available sunlight is under threat. New research shows that touch-sensitive plants can communicate a warning message to their related neighbours, advising them to adjust their growth patterns accordingly.

And employers think over-50’s are ‘too old to learn new technology’. The good news is I know for a fact they are wrong.

Excerpt from my forthcoming book: The raw, vegan diet of the gorilla requires hours upon hours of eating plants to provide enough calories to support their mass. This can fill 80% of a 12-hour waking day … Humans, thanks to cooking, have many extra hours to devote to, building, helping one another and, let’s face it, chatting and socialising.

iPhone 7 at 30%, Samsung 7’s demise, AirPods, iOS 10 at 54%, Dropbox, Facebook, Apple Watch ban for UK ministers


UK ministers of parliament have been told not to wear Apple watches at meetings in case 'Russians' are using them to listen in.
UK ministers of parliament have been told not to wear Apple watches at meetings in case ‘Russians’ are using them to listen in.

The iPhone 7 Plus makes up 30% of new model iPhone sales — Survey data from Fiksu indicates that the iPhone 7 Plus now makes up 30% of iPhone 7 sales, the highest percentage ever for the Plus models. The ratio may go even higher for the December quarter.

Samsung Discontinues Galaxy Note 7 manufacturing and sales — This just in: Samsung has officially discontinued manufacturing and sales of the Galaxy Note 7. With repeated incidents of the devices, and replacement devices, catching fire, the company announced on Tuesday it would cease making and selling them. [Well, if you bought one from Spark …]

Apple AirPods: a strategy of ambience and scarcity — UBS financial analyst Steve Milunovich has presented an interesting theory about Apple’s Ambient strategy: “…different input/output methods that can be flexibly utilized depending on the situation (sitting, walking, running, driving). Collectively these devices offer the capability of earlier products … delivered as a seamless user experience.” In addition, the notion of created and evolving scarcity punctuates the Apple strategy.

Official Apple figures peg iOS 10 adoption rate at 54% — Apple this week released the first official statistics on iOS 10 adoption since the OS went live in September, revealing more than half of compatible devices are now running current generation software.

Dropbox gets Messages app, new widget & more for iOS 10 — Later today Dropbox will release a major iOS update, adding features like a new widget and a Messages app for iOS 10, and the beginnings of better multitasking support on iPads.

Facebook launches Slack competitor Workplace with iOS, Android & Web apps — Facebook on Monday officially introduced Workplace, a long-in-testing collaboration tool for businesses and other organizations, aimed at challenging similar offerings from the likes of Slack.

Potential Apple Watch snooping: a not-so-paranoid cyberespionage risk — UK ministers have reportedly been barred from wearing the Apple Watch in sensitive meetings. It sounds paranoid, but the next time you enter a highly confidential meeting, leave your smart watch behind. It’s possible the device could be spying on you. Ministers in the UK have recently been banned from wearing Apple Watches during cabinet meetings on fears that the devices could be hacked by Russian cyberspies, according to The Telegraph.
Earlier this year, researchers found that Apple Watches can be theoretically hacked to record a user’s hand movements, and even steal PIN numbers typed into ATM machines. [Theoretically. So far, the Apple Watch has not become a real target for malware.]

Spaceship Campus, Omnigraffle viewer, 10.10.3 beta, Accessibility bugs, Facebook


AppleCampus

Exclusive March aerial tour of Apple Inc’s Campus 2 shows ‘Spaceship’ Ring, tunnel, theatre progress, more — Apple’s Campus 2 mega-project continues to progress on its Spaceship Ring, where concrete panels are filling out a floor. Tunnels that will connect to parking garages are emerging, the first parking structure is getting its finishing steps before the installation of solar panels. [I bet there’s a bunker somewhere, too.]

Chrome viewer for Omnigraffle — Two years after the release of a free Visio viewer Lucidchart, an online diagramming application, has followed up with the release of a free OmniGraffle viewer.
Anyone can view OmniGraffle (.graffle) files, whether those files are stored locally, online, or sent as email attachments in Gmail.
Users who open a free Lucidchart account can start editing OmniGraffle files online.
Lucidchart is a visual communication platform comparable to OmniGraffle, but it’s cloud-based, meaning that team members can collaborate in real time and access their files on a variety of devices and platforms.

Apple issues new OS X 10.10.3 beta, fixing bug that affected latest MacBooks — Only a few days after the previous build was issued to developers, Apple has provided a new beta of OS X 10.10.3, addressing a crashing bug that affected the newly released 13-inch MacBook Pro.

Do it yourself guide to squashing Accessibility bugs — Apple’s Accessibility Department has a long track record of using customer feedback to drive improvement. Here’s how to add yours.

Facebook clarifies rules for content, including definition of nudity and hate speech — Facebook has released a new version of its community standards, defining in detail what it means by offensive content on issues such as nudity, bullying and hate speech.

Making DVDs from old iMovie projects and slideshows — Glenn Fleishman at Macworld tells you how.