Tag Archives: free tips

Five Tip Friday ~ Five for iOS


1/ Print to PDF from any app from iPhone and iPad — This trick relies upon a hidden feature of the Share Sheet. To print from any app, such as Safari, you begin by tapping the Share icon. Next, tap the Print icon from the bottom row of the Share Sheet. Depending on what you’ve enabled, you might have to scroll to the right to find it. Now, to access the PDF view, simply 3D Touch (or pinch together two fingers to zoom out, in no0n-3D Touch devices) in the preview area of the PDF.
With that done, you should be in a PDF view of your document, web page, or whatever. Your next step is to share it. Just tap the Share icon, and choose where you want to send your PDF. You can share it via Messages or Mail, or any other app that supports the Share Sheet extensions.

Another great option is iBooks, if you want to keep all of your PDFs together, but there’s often a Share Sheet icon there to do that directly. But you can even save the PDF file to your iCloud drive or Dropbox.
Saving the web pages you’ve visited to PDF is a great way to keep notes when you’re researching. Other options for where to save those PDF files include Evernote and even the built-in Notes app.

2/ Use the Remote app to control your iTunes library in macOS Sierra with your iDevice — If you have an iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch you can use the Apple Remote app — free from the Apple App Store — to control your Mac’s iTunes library from a distance.
First, pair the app with the iTunes library (or libraries) you want to control. Your device and your computer must be on the same wireless network.
If you have Remote 2.0 (or later) and Home Sharing is turned on, you can set Remote to pair automatically with any of the iTunes libraries on your Home Sharing network. You can also pair Remote directly with iTunes libraries that aren’t in your Home Sharing network. To pair the Remote with an iTunes library: Tap Remote on your device’s Home screen.
Tap Add an iTunes Library.
A 4-digit code appears.
Open iTunes on your computer and click the Remote button .
Type the 4-digit code in the iTunes window.
iTunes pairs the library on your computer with the Remote app on your device.
Pair Remote with your Home Sharing network.
To use Remote 2.0 (or later) with Home Sharing, every iTunes library you want to control must have Home Sharing turned on.
Tap Remote on your device’s Home screen.
Tap Settings.
Tap to turn Home Sharing on.
Type your Apple ID and password, and tap Done.
Tap the iTunes library or Apple TV you want to control.

3/ Use Home Sharing to import items from another iTunes library — You can use Home Sharing to import items from up to five iTunes libraries on other computers on your home network? You can (assuming you have an Apple ID).
When you use your Mac on your Home Sharing network to download an item from the iTunes Store, you can have the item download automatically to other computers on your Home Sharing network.
Turn on Home Sharing. Choose File > Home Sharing > Turn On Home Sharing.
Type in your Apple ID and password, and click Turn On Home Sharing.
If you don’t have an Apple ID, click “Don’t have an Apple ID?” and follow the onscreen instructions.
To import items from other libraries using Home Sharing, choose a computer on your Home Sharing network from the Library pop-up menu. The library loads and a list of categories appears.
Choose a category (Music, for example). In the Show menu at the bottom of the iTunes window, choose “Items not in my library.” Select the items you want to import, and click Import.
To automatically import new iTunes Stores purchases from another computer, choose a computer on your Home Sharing network from the Library pop-up menu. Choose a category (Music, for example).
Click Settings at the bottom of the window. In the window that appears, select “Automatically transfer new purchases from Library Name.” Select the types of items you want to import. Click OK.
To turn off Home Sharing, on each computer, choose File > Home Sharing > Turn Off Home Sharing. If a shared computer doesn’t appear when Home Sharing is on, turn Home Sharing off, and then turn it on again.

4/ Disable homescreen rotation on Apple’s Plus-series iPhones — By default, Apple’s iPhone 6 Plus, 6s Plus, and 7 Plus add an auto-rotating home screen to iOS, rearranging icons and the dock whenever a device is tilted sideways.
Aside from the Control Center orientation lock, here’s an indirect way of achieving the same result:
Within the Settings app, tap on Display & Brightness, then on “View” under the Display Zoomcategory towards the very bottom. Nominally this option just makes it easier to browse and tap on icons. As a consequence of using it, however, the home screen will no longer rotate.
To make the switch, tap on ‘Zoomed,’ then on ‘Set.’ Technically an iPhone has to reset to apply the change, but unlike a normal reboot this should only take several seconds.
That’s it — to reverse course, go back to the Display Zoom menu and select ‘Standard’ instead. The above method works in iOS 9 and 10.
Note that at least some apps, like Apple Messages, will continue to rotate their own interfaces even with Display Zoom on, and there may be no way of disabling this within an app’s settings. [From AppleInsider.]

5/ Using 3D Touch — If you have iPhone 6s or later, you may not be using 3D Touch, a more pressured press on the screen that releases a wealth of extra possibilities, for example when you are typing:
The first time you 3D Touch anywhere on the keyboard, you can start dragging the cursor around to place it in a specific spot. It’s a great way to get exact placement without fidgeting with your finger.
But, if you don’t lift your finger after that first 3D Touch and do it again, you’ll select the adjacent full word. 3D Touch one more time without lifting, and you’ll select the entire sentence surrounding the cursor. These extra actions take a little practice, but they’re darn handy once you get them down. [Here are a whole lot more handy 3D Touch features, from the Mac Observer.]

 

Five Tip Friday ~ Sharing locations, closing all apps, Safari reader and DNS in iOS


1/ Share your location quickly from the Maps app — It’s pretty quick to share your location in Messages, but sometimes you’re in the Maps app when you suddenly think ‘it would be great to tell so-n-so this is where I am, or will be…’ and to be able to do this via other apps like Mail, as well.
Luckily, this is possible.
In the Maps app, navigate to the location you want to pin and share. Tap and hold on that location until the round red pin flag appears (shown at left).
To fine-tune the location, tap on Edit Location – now you can drag the map around until the pin is exactly where you want it.
Anyway, once you’ve got it where you want it, tap Done to go back to the main map screen.)
Now tap the Share button (marked above, at lower right) to send out the pin location to whoever you want, via Messages, Mail, Twitter, Facebook, or with any other app with its Sharing Sheet extension turned on.

2/ Share your GPS coordinates — To get really geeky, you can also share your precise geographical coordinates. Open up the Compass app and wait a few seconds. Your latitude and longitude should appear at the bottom of the screen. Tap and hold on the coordinates, and then choose Copy: you can now paste your coordinates into a text message, email or anywhere else.

After you double-click your Home button, you can swipe left and right through running apps to quickly change to another (tap on the one you want) or swipe upwards to ‘quit’ them (stop them using your iDevice’s resources, RAM, data etc)

3/ Close all running apps in one hit — This is contentious with some claiming it’s not necessary. But I’m firmly in the camp that having dozens of apps running at once makes your iDevice laggy, since apps don’t automatically quit when you can’t see them on iPhone/iPad. In other words, having an app running, then pressing the Home button to launch another app, actually leaves that first app running until you can have dozens of apps all running at once – you can see this by double-clicking the Home button, from which view you can swipe apps upwards to actually quit them, or swipe left and right to go through them and tap the ones you want to work or play in again.
But the following process suspends all your apps, freeing up memory and processor time:
• Press the Sleep/Wake button until you see the slider to shut down your iPhone.
• Now press and hold the Home Button for approximately five seconds, or until you are returned to either your Lock or Home Screen…
That’s it, your apps have all been suspended. If you double-press the Home Button, you’ll still see each of them still listed as if they are running, and they’re still instantly available form this view, but you might notice these apps actually refresh (or relaunch) when you tap on them. That’s because they’ve actually been properly suspended, freeing up memory.

4/ Shared Links in iOS Safari — Shared Links is a tab that’s been around since iOS 7, but was used to just support Twitter accounts. Now the feature also supports RSS feeds. To get to the shared links, tap on the Bookmarks button at the bottom row of Safari. Next, tap on the tab with the “@” sign, and you’ll be in your Shared Links. One of the first feeds that will show up in Shared Links, if you have signed into the social media network in the Settings app, is your Twitter timeline. Long-hold on that Bookmarks button, and a new menu pops up with Add Bookmark, Add to Reading List and Add to Shared Links. Tap on that last one, and voilà, the RSS feed for the page you’re looking shows up.
If Add to Shared Links doesn’t appear, try going to an article on that site instead of the home page. The Shared Links option will often appear then.

5/ Easily change your DNS — This won’t apply to most people, but it’s possible to change your DNS address to access more online than your typical ISP might allow. DNS stands for Domain Name System, the type of system used to name any device or service connected to the internet. It translates numerical IP addresses to more human-friendly names (ie, to http://www.mac-nz.com). Your browser requests are sent to a DNS server controlled by a third party – usually this would be your ISP. But it’s possible for your ISP to know which websites you visit, but also censor websites it doesn’t like. Thankfully, there are DNS services that are committed to privacy and defeating censorship. Assuming you know some of these like OpenNicProject: you will need the DNS addresses: a series of numbers separated by full stops.
Open the Settings app on your iOS device and navigate to Wi-Fi and find the network you’re connected to. Tap the blue “i” to the right of it. This is where you see the network settings.
Look for the section called DNS. You can tap on the empty space, and type in the DNS primary and secondary server. Type in the primary address first, followed by a comma (no space), then the secondary server address.

Five Tip Friday ~ smarter Sends from Mail, Do Not Disturb, folders for Notes, text selection


1/ Automatically select best account to send from in Mac Mail — Apple Mail received a new feature in Sierra that automatically chooses the best account for you to send a new message from, based on who your email is addressed to and what mailbox and message you had selected when you started composing.
To turn this on (or off) open Mail’s Preferences from the menus at the top. Use the Composing Tab in Mail Preferences to access your settings for sending messages. Under the Composing tab, you’ll see a drop-down next to “Send new messages from.” Pick that to view your options.
You might almost always want to send from your work email address, but if you want to try out letting Apple Mail pick for you, then toggle that drop-down to “Automatically select best account.”

2/ Enable Do Not Disturb in macOS to silence notifications — Notifications can be a mixed blessing. For some they keep the chaos of communications down and allow for rapid response to an email or a Tweet, but for others they can be an annoying distraction.
You can silence notifications until midnight quickly, with a single click. To get that done, option-click (hold down the Option key on your keyboard while you click) on the Notifications icon in the upper-right hand corner of the desktop.
To show that Notifications are muted, the icon becomes greyed out. When the icon is greyed, you can still invoke the Notifications tray by clicking on the icon again — but this won’t un-mute them.
To do so, either pop open the Notifications tray and turn them back on with the toggle, or option-click on the Notifications icon in the menubar again.

3/ Who can and can’t bother you — If you want more precise control over what gets to bother you, delve into the settings of the feature itself.
Select System Preferences from the apple Menu (or from the Dock). In the upper right hand corner of the system preferences, select Notifications. From this menu, most parameters of Notification Center are set. Setting the schedule for notifications to not bother you at all during working hours is a good solution for the easily distracted.
There are other settings here, such as the ability to turn them off when the the display is being mirrored for a presentation, or to allow for a particularly persistent caller to break though your need to not be disturbed.
However, another option to quiet the tumult is to tell the most frequent offender to not pop up a notification. Select whatever app you wish to silence from the left hand column, and turn it off, or pare down when it will yell at you.

4/ Set folders in the Notes app — There aren’t a lot of ways to organize notes in Apple Notes, which became so much more powerful in Yosemite. But you can set folders and subfolders – clock the Elis icon at lower left in the Notes window to create a folder. There’s no obvious way to create a subfolder, but in fact all you do is drag one folder into another.
Keep in mind that if you delete a folder, then all of the subfolders and notes will also be deleted.
(Unfortunately, it’s not possible to create subfolders in iOS Notes.But if you create your subfolders on macOS, and do sync over to iOS.)

5/ Text selection tricks — Clicking anywhere within text in a document places your cursor there for deleting or adding to what you’ve written. While you can click and drag to select text, sometimes this means you miss a few letters. If you want to just select one word, it’s much faster to double-click it.
A triple-click selects the entire paragraph your cursor is on.
More sophisticated still: hold that final click and move your cursor – the selection jumps by full words or full paragraphs each time … no missing letters!

Five Tip Friday ~ Quirks and tips for Messages, Activation Lock Status


With the dearth of iDevice news today, here are five tips for iPhone.

1/ Use the full-screen camera — When you’re messaging with someone from your iPhone, you can tap the arrow next to the typing field to access your pictures with the little camera icon that’ll appear.
Once you’re in that camera mode, though, all you’ll see is a few of your recent images and a tiny viewscreen on the iPhone.
That small little viewfinder panel, however, lets you swipe from left to right (see that little left-punting arrow on the left, above?) to reveal another couple of options: a full-screen camera viewfinder and access to your whole Photos library (below). Now you can use your full-screen camera within Messages or look through your entire photo library on your device, so if there’s a picture from a few months back, you don’t have to switch apps to find it.

2/ Share your location — There’s a really quick way to share your location with someone you’re messaging, so he or she can route to where you are or know how long it’ll take to get to you. To do this, tap the small ‘i’ at the top of any Messages conversation…
Tapping the Info button in a chat reveals the Send My Current Location feature. That’ll immediately pass along your location info into the chat, and your recipient can then touch that map to get directions right to where you are.

3/ Draw on videos — To add lines, circles, arrows etc within Messages to videos and images, tap the arrow and then touch the heart icon. Tap the Video Camera button, and you can draw on your screen to highlight whatever you like.
You can either draw before you start taking a video, which will superimpose your drawing over what you record, or you can draw during video-recording to highlight something at a specific moment.

4/ See which number someone used — If you’re not sure which number or email address is the correct one to use for texting with a contact, you can tell within the Messages app by seeing which one he or she has used recently. Start by tapping their name at the top of your conversation to access their contact info.
When that appears, look for which number is marked Recent.
[These four tips came from Melissa Holt at the Mac Observer – this link has more pictures than I have published.]

5/ How to still check an iPhone’s Activation Lock — Apple deleted its iCloud Activation Lock status check tool from its website earlier this year. That tool was a simple yet effective method of checking whether a used iPhone, iPad, iPod or Apple Watch was stolen. But a newly discovered workaround promises an alternative online resource for buyers in the market for secondhand iOS devices [AKA iDevices].
Apple’s online checker involved entering an IMEI, so the tool served as an ideal source for generating valid serial numbers. It has been theorized that Apple scrapped the online resource to better protect its customer base.
But owners or potential buyers can still check Activation Lock status by IMEI through Apple’s own support pages. Be forewarned: the workaround’s success is spotty and it might be completely removed from Apple’s website at any time.
First, visit Apple’s Support website and select iPhone. Click on a search category related to hardware, for example Battery, Power & Charging or Repairs & Physical Damage, then select a specific problem like ‘Buttons not working’.
On the next page, you should see an option to Send in for Repair. If the item is not listed, go back and select a different device problem from the previous screen. Clicking through Send in for Repair will retrieve a page that allows users to ‘Enter your serial number, IMEI, or MEID’.
[These numbers, by the way, are in on your iPhone and iPad and iPod Touch under Settings>General>About. You should record these or take a screenshot of the page by pressing the Home and Sleep buttons at the same time and emailing the image your iDevice records to your Photos library to your Mac or PC.]
Enter the IMEI of a target device to check its Activation Lock status. It should be noted that the described method is not always successful. In some cases, Apple’s website will direct users to sign in with their Apple ID, which the company normally uses to facilitate service with linked iCloud devices.
The workaround seems to be a carryover from the days when iCloud Activation Lock status was a thing. It remains unclear how long the loophole will remain active in its current form, as Apple appears to be — slowly — transitioning the entire Support website to lead directly to users’ Apple ID accounts.

Five Tip Friday ~ Public Calendar, folder hierarchy, Safari tabs, Finder tabs


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1/ Configure a Public Calendar — Using iCloud, you can set up a public calendar. This is different from the typical iCloud calendar sharing in which all participants can usually edit and add events themselves. Depending on how you set the permissions, a public calendar will instead show anyone with its link all of its events but won’t allow them to make any changes. While this used to be only available to iCloud users, now PC users can also access these public calendars as long as they’ve got a program that supports iCalendar files (as Microsoft Outlook does).
Open the Calendar program on your Mac, then decide whether you’d like to use an existing calendar or create a new blank one. Keep in mind that anyone with the link will be able to view all of the events you add to this calendar, so if privacy’s a big concern, then I would start with a blank one to be sure you haven’t added anything in the past: File>New Calendar from the top menu. Name your creation within the sidebar and press the Return key to accept the name, then hold down the Control key on your keyboard and click on that calendar name in the sidebar to get the pop-out menu (shown above).
Click that, and you can set the calendar’s sharing.
Now you need to send the link that appears to the right of ‘URL’ to the people who might like to subscribe. You can do that by clicking that little Share Sheet icon to the right of the link, which gives you the usual choices for messaging or emailing that info, or you can just copy the link from that box and paste it in somewhere to send it.
hen your recipient clicks the link on a Mac, they will see something like ‘Allow Permission’. If permission is granted, Calendar will open and offer to subscribe to your Calendar. (There’s more about this at Mac Observer, although the writer may have been using an older version of Calendar as her prison are slightly different to the latest setup detailed above).

2/ See the hierarchy of your File Locations — Clicking on the name of a file may give you some options for what to do with it, depending on what program you’re in. However, you can also right-click, Control-click, or Command-click on title bar of a file in the Finder to see a hierarchical view of where that file lives. This works in tons of places around your Mac, too. When you’ve got that little box open, you can click any of the folders shown to jump right to it.
One place this is unexpectedly helpful is in Mail. If you’re one of those who double-clicks to open emails into their own windows, a simple Command- or Control-click of its subject at the top will reveal its full hierarchical location.
You can do this all around macOS, but Microsoft Office is an outlier. You can still see the same info using this trick in those applications, but not with a Command-click. Only a right- or Control-click will do.

3/ Mac Safari tabs — macOS has long had a keyboard shortcut for restoring Safari tabs. All you have to do is press the Command (⌘) key and while it’s held down, the Shift and while they’re both held down, the T key in old versions of OS X …but in macOS Sierra, you can hold down ⌘ + Shift, and press T multiple times to restore multiple tabs.

foltabs

4/ Folder tabs — If you’re happily using Safari tabs (and you really, really should be) why not do the same thing in the Finder? Each Mac folder window is capable of using a tabbed interface, perfect for juggling multiple open folders within the same window.  But because tabs generally don’t appear in a folder window unless you specifically add them, it’s easy to miss that Mac folders have tabs. Once you get used to them, though, you’ll love ’em.
If a folder contains any subfolders, right-click (of holed down the Control key and normal-click) on one of those subfolders, then select Open in New Tab.
When you do, a new folder tab will appear in your original folder window, just like a new browser tab would in Safari.
You can switch folder “views” (icon, list, columns, etc.) in one tab while keeping the folder views different in other tabs, and you can also navigate to a completely different folder within a tab.
Just drag a folder tab onto the desktop to turn it into its own window.
To re-arrange your tabs within a folder window, click and drag a tab, just as you would in a browser window.
To turn a tab into a separate window,  click a folder tab and drag it out onto the desktop; when you do, it’ll snap into its very own window.

5/ Use tabs to rearrange where files are — You can also drag files from one folder tab to another: click and hold a file in one folder tab and drag it onto the tab of another folder. When you do, the top of the second folder tab will flash briefly, and then the tab itself will open; once it does, just drop the file wherever you’d like it to go in the tab.

MagBytes 84 is here!


mb84Here it is folks, with a large Tips section, Shiny and New and lots of news, updates and even some views. It looks like the image above, and you can download it no obligations and entirely for free by clicking ….

THIS LINK —> MagBytes 84 for February 2017! Enjoy
(and feedback is always welcome)

Five Tip Friday ~ Siri’s Batman Easter Egg, AirPods volume control, save emails into PDFs


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1/ Siri has a LEGO Batman Easter Egg — Once these hidden little gems proliferated through Apple stuff but steve Jobs banned them. But sometimes you find them, and they’re even more precious now that they’re so rare. Press-and-hold your iPhone’s Home button to activate Siri, and get your Batman on by saying ‘Hey, computer’  and Siri respond with bat-appropriate comments. Cool huh? (This also works on Siri for Mac.)

2/ AirPods volume control is via Siri — Telling Siri to “increase/decrease volume” will land users at the nearest default level —0, 13, 25, 38, 50, 63, 75, 88 and 100 percent.

3/ Add percentages — You can add percentages from 0 to 100 percent onto the back of volume control commands. Granular changes within two percentage points are hardly noticeable, but tweaks above three points are surprisingly distinct.
For those who want greater control, Siri lets users set audio output volumes by percentage.
First, invoke Siri with a double tap on an AirPod, or say Hey Siri or long-press your iPhone/iPad Home button. Now say, “Set volume at 53 percent” or “lower volume to 23 percent.” Apple’s virtual assistant is capable of understanding a number of command variations including “raise/lower volume,” “turn sound up/down,” and “increase/decrease volume,” among others.

4/ What percentage are you at? To discover current listening levels, users can ask Siri, “What percent is the volume?” or “what is the volume?”

5/ Print PDFs from emails — There is another hidden feature in iOS – this one lets you print-to-PDF with any email. This doesn’t require a third-party app or another email client: you can do it inside Apple Mail with 3D Touch. Open Apple Mail on your iDevice (iPhone and iPad). Open the email you want to save. Tap the Reply button and a menu pops up with three options: Reply, Forward – and Print. Tap Print.
You’ll now see a screen where you can select a physical printer over Wi-Fi. But if you 3D Touch the email (press harder on the screen, a feature added from iPhone 6s), this message it will ‘pop’ and add a Share button at bottom right which lets you Share the email to PDF. This works for single page emails and emails with multiple pages. It’s a great way to save email receipts or important emails from VIPs.

Five Tip Friday ~ Universal Clipboard, Markup, and Safari tips for Mac


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1/ Set up and use Universal Clipboard — The new Universal Clipboard feature in macOS Sierra and iOS 10 allows you to copy content, including text, images, photos and video from one Apple device and paste it in another. For example, you can browse a recipe on your Mac and paste the ingredients right to the grocery list on your iPhone. In theory, all you have to do is make sure all your Mac and iOS devices are on the same Wi-Fi network and that Bluetooth is enabled on your iPhone and/or iPad. Copy on one, choose Paste on the other … but if you can’t make this work (and there can be a lag between the cCopy then the ability to Paste), try signing out of iCloud on all of your devices, and then signing back in.

2/ Use Markup in macOS Sierra Photos — If you’re editing your images within Photos, you can apply filters, remove red-eye, crop things and so on. But macOS Sierra added Markup to Photos, which lets you add text boxes, shapes or drawings to your images.
Select the picture you’d like to annotate, then click the edit button in the toolbar (it looks like a set of sliders). In edit mode, you’ll see a list of tools along the side. Click on Extensions and the Markup option appears. Click this and you can add circles or stars around people, insert text boxes and more.

3/ Reopen recently used tabs in Safari — Launch Safari for Mac and in the Mac’s menu bar for Safari, and the obvious way is to click History. From the list of options with the History menu item, slide down to select Recently Closed. Hovering over this menu item produces a new contextual menu that shows all recently-closed Safari tabs. Select the item that you wish to reopen and click on it. You probably – hopefully! – knew that, but there’s a faster way to do it:

4/ Reopen recently used tabs in Safari (2) —To the right hand side of any open tab in Safari there is a Plus(+) icon. Clicking this opens a new Safari tab window. However, if you right-click (or hold down the Control key on your keyboard and normal-click) on the Plus(+) icon, a new menu appears that shows all recently-closed tabs. Select one to launch it.

5/ Turn Flash off for sites except for some — Flash sucks – it’s a resource hog, can allow malware in and it’s generally unpopular for good reason. So let’s take control of it. First, open any sites where you know you still need to use Flash (which allows those little web animations to play.) There are alternatives to Flash, and many sites including YouTube, have switched to the much better, higher resolution and faster HTML5. But if you’re stuck with needing some sites that still use Flash, read on.
On your Mac, open Preferences>Security>Plug-in Settings… and choose Adobe Flash Player. Set ‘When visiting other websites’ to Off to cause all other servers to send you HTML 5 instead (this is faster, more secure) content when available. But you can choose from among your open sites to give them permission to use the Flash plug-in and Safari will remember your choice for your next visit.

Five Tip Friday ~ iOS 10 tips and tricks


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1/ Search tabs in Safari — The iOS 10 version of Safari lets you open up an unlimited number of tabs while you’re browsing. That does bring its own problems though, including not being able to keep track of your browsing, and that’s where tab search comes in.
Rotate your device into landscape mode (it will not work in portrait) then tap the tabs button. A new search box appears in the top left corner. (You may have to swipe the screen downwards and ‘bounce’ it to make the icons appear).
Enter your search terms and Safari filters out the tabs as you go. Bear in mind you’re only searching through the titles of the tabs and not the actual web pages. When you’ve found what you’re looking for, tap to open the tab.

2/ Set your preferred contacts — Apple finally lets you set the default communication method for each category (call, message, video, mail): press and hold on the relevant blue iconic the Contacts app. This will initiate a call or a message or whatever, so just be ready to cancel it. But iOS 10 keeps this as the default for next time.
Confusingly, this doesn’t change the default communication method if your contact is already listed as a ‘favorite’. Pick ‘Add to Favorites’ to set your preferred option, then head to the Favorites screen itself to ensure it’s the only choice for that contact.
These listed favourite options are the ones Siri uses when you ask it to initiate a communication with someone.

3/ Edit contacts in-line in Mail — You have long been able to tap a contact’s name in email headers to view their details. In iOS 10, you can now edit them right there, as long as they’re listed in Contacts. If they aren’t, you can use the typical add/update contact option, then edit in-line.

4/ Answer Messages from the Lock screen, or not — Under iOS 10, we can now reply to messages without unlocking our devices, which is really convenient. The text that shows up shows ‘Press for more’ on iPhone 6s and 7, and ‘Slide for more’ on earlier iPhones. You can turn this feature off if you’re worried about others replying to your messages from your iPhone while it’s on lock – the option is under Settings > Touch ID & Passcode > Allow Access When Locked, and it’s labeled ‘Reply with Message.’ If you turn that off, pressing or sliding on an incoming message will not work.

5/ Reduce Motion affects Message effects — An unintended side effect of the Reduce Motion option in Settings>General>Accessibility is that it disables all Screen and Bubble Effects in the new Messages app. Users with Reduce Motion enabled cannot access the Effects interface, and no Effects associated with incoming messages will be displayed.
To check your own iOS device, head to Settings>General>Accessibility. In the Vision section is an option labeled Reduce Motion. Tap it to reveal the option’s toggle and set your desired preference to disable or enable it. So if you long ago enabled the Reduce Motion option and are now wondering why you can’t see these new Message Effects, this is probably why.

Five Tip Friday ~ Are you using Siri on Mac? More good reasons to try


Siri offers a quick way to get your system specs
Siri offers a quick way to get your system specs – clicking the More Details bar launches the usual About This Mac dialogue.

1/ Siri by default — If you keep forgetting that Siri is now in your Mac, to encourage yourself to use Siri consider changing the keyboard shortcut that launches it to Command + Space. This is usually the keyboard shortcut for Spotlight – then you can change Spotlight’s keyboard shortcut to Option-Space, or something.
Why? Whenever muscle memory presses the shortcut that used to summon Spotlight, Siri appears instead and forces you to find the file, open the application, perform the Web search, or whatever using your voice instead of the keyboard.
You can change Siri’s shortcut in System Preferences>Siri, and the one for Spotlight in System Preferences>Spotlight.

2/ Need some more reasons to give Siri a go? Siri is brilliant at maths: complex equations, Pi, conversions of anything to anything, percentages … it’s so much easier than launching apps and tapping keys and all that palaver.

3/ Get your system specs — The information available under Apple Menu>About This Mac has been vastly improved, but now we have another way to figure out machine specs in macOS Sierra: Siri. Apple’s voice assistant can answer all sorts of questions for you or for anyone you’re trying to help, like ‘How much memory is on my Mac?’ ‘How much free storage do I have on my Mac?’ and ‘How fast is my Mac?’
Click on the Siri icon in the upper-right corner of your screen or hold down the key-combo, and start talking.

4/ What’s the weather like? Siri will respond to a variety of weather-related queries, from the standard “What’s the weather forecast for today?” to more conversational requests, such as “Will it rain today?” Yussss!

5/ Your system can recommend how to save storage space — If you’re running out of space on your Mac, Sierra’s has suggestions for you. The latest version of macOS makes recommendations based on your current usage of your drive.
Click on the Apple Menu at the upper-left corner of your screen and choose About This Mac. Now click the Storage tab, and from there, pick Manage. When the next window pops up, select Recommendations in the sidebar, and you’ll see what your Mac thinks you need to do. This might suggest setting the trash to empty every 30 days, automatically removing iTunes media after you’ve watched it etc. When you click on the button next to one of the recommendations, your Mac will walk you through turning it on and will mention any caveats.
Be sure your machine has a backup before you make any big changes like these, especially if you’re going to turn on iCloud Photo Library and sync your images with your other Apple devices.
If the Recommendations feature is asking you to do something you don’t understand (especially if you’re using the Reduce Clutter option to review your files), then consider putting the brakes on. Better to keep extra files on your Mac than to remove something you need(although, of course, you really should have a backup).

Want more? Check out this list at TekReview.