Tag Archives: free tips

MagBytes 93 is here … and it’s the last one.


Here is MagBytes 93, the final issue. I am sorry everyone who enjoys this effort of mine, but I no longer have time to do this, and I will also be cutting my Apple news updates dramatically, and no more Friday tips, as I explain in MagBytes 93 on Page 9. I thank you for your support over the last ten years but I simply cannot sustain this any longer.

I will continue to write commentary on Apple when it’s relevant and I have the time on Mac NZ, I will continue to write reviews. I will continue with Futurology and The Apocalypticon (on weekends) as they support my other interests.

Please download MagBytes 93 from this link —>> Issue93November17

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Five Tip Friday ~ macOS views and Safari tracking and URLs


1/ Use a keyboard shortcut for display mirroring in Mac OS High Sierra — Display mirroring is when your external monitor and laptop display show the same screen, instead of dividing the view between. The shortcut to the System Preferences > Displays > Arrangement > Mirror Displays command is Command-F1, which turns display mirroring on and off in macOS High Sierra.

2/ Use Night Shift in macOS High Sierra — macOS High Sierra has Night Shift, a feature brought over from iOS. It helps you reduce the amount of blue light you’re exposed to during the evening by shifting the display of a Mac to a more yellow tone, which is supposed to assist you later, together to sleep.  The proliferation of electronics with screens, as well as energy-efficient lighting, is increasing our exposure to blue wavelengths, especially after sundown, and this may affect sleeping patterns.
Open the System Preferences app.
Click Displays.
Select Night Shift.
You can turn Night Shift on or off. Set it to come on from sunset to sunrise — or you can use the Customize options to implement it for the hours of your choosing.
You can also adjust the colour temperature via a slider, but warmer settings may affect the appearance of some onscreen motion.

3/ Disable Split View in Mail — For those who use Mail in full-screen mode, you may have noticed that High Sierra now defaults to a split-screen view when you’re composing a message or when you’ve double-clicked on an email to open it in its own window. If you’re not a fan of this, it’s really easy to disable. Choose Preferences from the Mail menu at the top of your screen, then click on the General tab. ‘Prefer opening messages in split view when in full screen’ is the checked box, so uncheck that box. When you do so, Mail’s full-screen mode reverts to its previous behaviour.

4/ Block Cross-site tracking in Safari — Apple promised a way to block websites from cross-site tracking in Safari in macOS High Sierra and iOS 11. The idea is that you won’t see ads for a product you just looked up when you on, say, a news site. If you’re still seeing ads like that after upgrading to Apple’s new operating systems it’s easy to see if preventing cross-site tracking is really enabled.
Launch Safari on your Mac
Go to Safari > Preferences from the menu bar
Click the Privacy tab
Check ‘Prevent cross-site tracking’
(This is also where to  find the ‘Ask websites not to track me’ setting.)
You can do this on iOS, too. Prevent Cross-Site Tracking in iOS 11 involves a trip to the Settings app, under Safari.

5/ Show full website addresses in Safari — Starting around OS X Yosemite, Apple has chosen to have Safari hide full website addresses by default. Instead, it only shows a basic name domain in the field at the top of browsers.
Go into Safari preferences by pressing Command (⌘) + Comma, or from the Safari menu, choose Preferences. Click on the Advanced tab at the far right.
The first menu item you’ll see is the Smart Search Field. Check or uncheck the box to turn the feature on or off: checking the box will show the full URL.
This lets you quickly see which part of a website you’re in.

Five Tip Friday ~ Some for iOS 11 (and iOS)


1/ Scan QR codes in iOS 11 — Apple has added QR support to iOS 11 so you can scan QR codes directly in the Camera app, without the need for a third-party app as previously:
Open the Camera app and make sure the rear facing camera is enabled.
Point the camera viewfinder at the QR code. Make sure the code is entirely visible in the view finder.
Hold the camera steady. The QR code will be scanned instantly and you’ll see a notification at the top of the iPhone or iPad screen describing what kind of QR code you’ve scanned (website QR Code, Calendar QR code, etc).|
You’ll see what action the QR code can perform (add event to your calendar, open page in Safari). You don’t have to to press the capture or shutter button. Just pointing the camera and holding it steady at the QR code is all you need to do.

2/ Stop apps from asking for reviews in iOS 11 — If you dislike the pop-up windows from apps constantly asking you to leave a review in iOS 11, you put an end to it.
Go to the Settings app.
Tap on iTunes, then App Store.
Turn the In-App Ratings & Review option off. Phew!

3/ Add the Magnifier to Control Center — The iOS Magnifier feature is a way to use your device as kind of a low-powered set of binoculars or a magnifying glass. It has been around since iOS 10 – a triple-click of the Home button boots it up if you have turned the feature on in Settings. In  iOS 11, tough, you can now add an icon for it into Control Center.
First, visit the Settings app and look for the Control Center section.
Tap that, then Customize Controls. Scroll down and touch the plus button next to Magnifier and it’ll appear at the top of your list under the Include section.
You can also drag any of the three-lined icons shown to the right of the tools above to set the order in which you want them to appear in Control Center. The next time you bring up Control Center by swiping up from the bottom of your Home Screen, you’ll see your new addition.

4/ Change Key Frames in Live Photos — One of the newest features in iOS 11 is the ability to change the key frames in Live Photos [a gimmick I’ve never got, but if you use it …]. The key frame is what appears in Photos to show what the sequence is, and it’s typically chosen automatically when you snap the picture.
Tap on the Live Photo you want to change, then, tap Edit in the top right corner. You’ll see a slider at the bottom of the photo with all of the frames available within the Live Photo. To change the key frames in Live Photos, you move the selector of that slider back and forth until you find the frame you like.
Once you’ve found the frame you prefer, tap on Make Key Photo to set the key frame of the Live Photo to the frame you like best.

5/ Teach Siri to correctly pronounce names on your iPhone — Asking Siri to text or call contacts is one of the virtual assistant’s basic functions, but some names can be hard for the system to understand and pronounce. AppleInsider shows you how to ensure correct pronunciation, and contact retrieval, in this video. [This also works in iOS 10.]

Five Tip Friday ~ macOS High Sierra and collaboration


1/ How to work on files together in macOS High Sierra — It’s easy to work on files together in macOS High Sierra. When you share a file in iCloud Drive, you and your team can all work in the same document – and never wonder who has the latest version.
Open the Finder, then choose iCloud Drive or a folder you’re syncing to iCloud (such as Desktop or Documents). Select a file (sorry, you can’t share a folder) and click the share button atop the window. Or just right-click a file and then click Share. You’ll see an Add People option in the share menu.
You can use Mail, Messages, Twitter, Facebook, AirDrop. When you select one of these options, a link to your file will be sent instead of an attachment.
There’s also a Copy Link button on the Add People menu. It lets you copy the link to a file to your clipboard to paste when you wish.

2/ Share notes form iBooks and macOS High Sierra — iBooks started in iOS, and the ability to share or export notes is a little better on iOS than it is in macOS High Sierra. Still, it’s not as intuitive or obvious as it should be.
Start with a note. To view all notes you have added to the book (ie an iBook in the iBooks app), tap the table of contents icon, then the Notes tab at the top. But you have to Tap Edit Notes > Select All. The notes get a check mark from being selected, and the Share button lights up. When you tap Share, you get a new menu with one option by default: Mail. Tap the Mail icon, and an email sheet will open where you can decide where to send it.
You can share notes from iBooks in macOS High Sierra, too, but it’s even less obvious. First, get to your notes by tapping the Notes icon. Click on a note to select it. If you then right click on the note (you can also just right-click to select in the first place), you get the option to Copy, or to share via Mail, Messages, Notes, Twitter, or Facebook, as shown below.
Here’s the bad news: you can only export/share one note at a time. While you can shift-click or option-slick to select multiple notes at one time, rick clicking on any of them deselects all but the one you’re right-clicking on. You’d have to share one note at a time and then copy-paste each of them into an email or other app to share them all at once.

3/ Pin a note to the top of your list in macOS High Sierra — Remember that Notes syncs across devices and Macs signed into the same iCloud account already, so it’s already ‘collaborative’. If you have a note that you update often, like a to-do list or shared brainstorm? You can pin it to the top of a list in macOS High Sierra.
Launch the Notes app and choose a note.
Click on File in the App menu at the upper left of the screen, then choose Pin Note.
The note is always easy to find. It will remain at the top of your list under a section called Pinned Notes, no matter what changes you make to the rest of your notes, or on which device. Pinned notes sync across all of your devices connected with the same iCloud account.
To unpin a note, launch the Notes app and choose a pinned note. Click on File in the App menu, and select Unpin Note.

4/ Use Keyboard Shortcuts in Apple Notes — You can use keyboard shortcuts in Apple Notes. It’s really fast to navigate and perform tasks on your Mac with keys, so try to do this whenever you can, at least when doing tasks in an app. Here’s a list of the commands.

5/ Use your iPhone or iPad as an Audio Input on your Mac — Your iPhone is a powerful communication device, so what if you want to play or record some of the audio from it through your Mac—like maybe for a podcast you’re recording. Turns out it’s easy and your Mac can even see your iPhone as just another audio input source. Read on to learn how to set it up.
To play audio from your iPhone or iPad you’ll need to a Lightning to USB cable, like the one that came with your device for charging and syncing. Connect your iPhone or iPad to your Mac with the cable, and then launch Audio Midi Setup on your computer. It’s in Applications/Utilities.
Use Audio Midi Setup to turn your iPhone into a new input source on your Mac
Now select your iPhone or iPad from the device list on the left and click Enable. Your iPhone or iPad will show up as a new input source in Sound Preferences so any audio playing on the device will play through your speakers, headphones, or other selected audio out device on your Mac.
This is a cool and easy way to use the audio on your iPhone in a podcast without having to find a way to first export it. The only limitation is that phone calls won’t play out – so you can’t use this as a way to record conversations.

Five Tip Friday ~ macOS High Sierra offers new features too


1/ How to Enable Type to Siri in macOS High Sierra — Just like in iOS 11, you can enable Type to Siri in macOS High Sierra. This is a feature that lets you type queries to Siri, just like you would a search engine. It’s useful for people who may feel awkward talking to their iPhone or Mac. It’s also helpful in certain situations where silence is a virtue, like in a library. Here’s how to turn in on in macOS.
Open System Preferences, then go to Accessibility. Scroll to the bottom and click on Siri in the left sidebar. You’ll see a checkbox that lets you turn on Type to Siri.
Next, go back into System Preferences and click on the Siri icon. You can enable or disable voice feedback, should you wish.

2/ Check a flight status using Spotlight — High Sierra has made it easier to check the status of a current or upcoming flight. Click on Spotlight’s magnifying-glass icon in the upper-right corner of your screen or press Spotlight’s keyboard shortcut (Command-Spacebar). Now type in the airline and flight number into the search bar that’ll appear.
If you end up with multiple results in the left-hand list, click through them to find the particular flight you’re looking for (and get more information on it).
You can also tell you have got than one result by the little pips at the bottom of the right-hand pane. This indicates you could swipe to view each of the results in turn if you’d rather do that than click them.

3/ Stop videos from auto-playing in Safari — Open Safari and go to Safari>Preferences. Click on the Websites tab, then select Auto-Play from the sidebar. Within this list, you’ll see the websites you currently have open and ones you’ve previously configured auto-play settings for (if any), both with drop-downs next to them:
Allow All Auto-Play – all videos on the site can autoplay.
Stop Media with Sound – only videos that don’t have audio will autoplay.
Never Auto-Play – no videos can autoplay.
Finally, there’s a drop-down at the bottom of that window that’ll allow you to change the global setting.
By default, Safari should stop all media with sound, but if you’d like to be a bit more heavy-handed, you could switch this to Never Auto-Play. Yes!

4/ Set up Custom Reminders — You set a reminder for yourself that repeats on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, or configure one that pops up on the first weekend day of every month, whenever that happens to fall.
Open the Reminders app and click on a blank line to type in the title of your item. Hover your cursor over your new reminder afterward, and you should see a small ‘i’. Click that and you’ll see the options for how you’ll be reminded. To set up a custom repeat, select On a Day, and then click next to the Repeat section. A drop-down menu will offer you a Custom choice. Set a frequency for your repeated reminder: daily, weekly, monthly or yearly. Every frequency type has its own options; for example, weekly lets you pick multiple days of the week on which to get your notifications.
You can do the same thing with Monthly or use the drop-down menus at the bottom to get reminded on, say, the first weekend day of every month. Just click Done to commit.
[Most of these tips, including the one above, came from Melissa Holt at the Mac Observer.]

5/ Use ‘Grep’ to Find Matching Lines — This one’s a bit more pointy-headed. The Terminal doesn’t care if you know what you’re doing, which is why it’s always a great idea to be careful what you type in it! But one command that’s simple to use (at least at its most basic level) is grep. You can use grep to pull lines that contain search terms out of a text file. Here’s how it works: Let’s pretend this text file of mine has many hundreds of lines of data that I need to paw through.
Terminal lives in your Applications>Utilities folder. It gives you a prompt to start (ending with a dollar sign) – type ‘grep test’ (without the the single quotes).
Now you have to tell Terminal which file to run things on. An easy way to do this is by making sure to type a space after your search term, and then drag and drop the file you want to search onto the Terminal window. The program will fill in the path to the file for you,.
If you then press Return on your keyboard, the Terminal window will fill up with the lines that match your search.
There’s a lot more detail, plus pictures, at the Mac Observer.

Five Tip Friday ~ Some tips for iOS and Watch users


Welcome to September, the month Apple launches an all-new iPhone! Until then lets rev up our existing iPhone use a little. 

1/  Selectively control Read Receipts for iMessage in iOS 10 — A read receipt in iMessage is simply a feature designed to let your contacts know when you’ve read their message. You can go into Settings to turn this on and off at will, but on iOS 9 and before, this setting turned it off for all contacts. With iOS 10 however, it’s possible to control read receipts for each of your contacts if they also have iPhones (otherwise the option is simply not available). Now you can let your boss know when you’ve read her message, while turning the feature off for that weird guy you met on Tinder [to quote Mac Observer!].
Open up a message from one of your contacts. In the upper right part of the screen, tap the blue circle with an ‘i’. There you can share your location, see a history of images and attachments with that contact – and control read receipts.]

2/ Modify AirPods behaviour — Once iOS 11 ships, which may be as soon as 12th September, you will have more options. For now, in iOS 10, you can change how your AirPods react when you double-tap on them, or switch what happens when you put them in your ears. You adjust these options on your iPhone or iPad. To get started, open your AirPods’ case or take them out of it, then visit Settings > Bluetooth on your paired iOS device.
There you’ll see a list of all of the Bluetooth devices you’ve added. If you don’t see Connected next to your AirPods, tap their name to connect.
Within this option, you can disconnect your AirPods (or have your device forget them entirely), change their name, or set what happens when you double-tap one of them. This is probably the most useful adjustment, as you could configure your AirPods to play/pause instead of invoking Siri with a double-tap.
Also on this screen are Automatic Ear Detection, which you can turn off if you don’t like your audio automatically being sent to your AirPods when you put them in your ears—and the Microphone setting. This lets you configure which AirPod you’d like to always be your microphone.

3/ Using 3D Touch in Spotlight — With a recent iPhone (6s/6s Plus or 7/7 Plus), you’re probably accustomed to your favourite uses for 3D Touch: looking at notifications within folders, opening new private tabs in Safari etc. You can also use Spotlight searches to find apps, and then if you press on a result within the Spotlight interface, you’ll get the same options you’d get by 3D-touching the app itself.
Start by swiping down on your home screen to open the iOS Spotlight search function, then type the name of an app into the search field at the top. Press with a little force on the app in the results to get the same Quick Action choices you would get from using 3D Touch on the app icon on the Home screen. You can use this, for example, to quickly find the Camera app and use its Quick Actions.

4/ In iOS 11, set up and customise Do Not Disturb While Driving — For those already beta-testing the next generation of iOS, you can do this now For the rest, you can do this soon. iOS 11 will add Do Not Disturb support for driving so you won’t get distracted while you’re cruising around town. You don’t have to use it, but if you do, it’s easy to set up and customise. Once iOS 11 is installed on your iPhone there’s a good chance you’ll get a dialogue asking if you want to turn on DND when you’re driving. The dialogue will pop up after you move off in your car.
Just tap Turn On While Driving and you’re set. Your iPhone will automatically go into DND mode when you’re in a moving car – it then mutes all incoming calls. You also won’t see other alerts and notifications while your car is in motion. (Of course, it won’ know if you’re driving or a passenger.)
DND While Driving can activate automatically when connected to your car’s Bluetooth, or manually. If you choose Manually, you will need to use the Do Not Disturb button in Control Center to activate the feature.
DND While Driving can auto-reply to text messages too. It’s your business who gets those messages, so you can change the settings and make your own custom reply:
Launch Settings on your iPhone
Tap Do Not Disturb
Choose Auto-Reply To
Select No One, Recents, Favorites, or All Contacts.
If you set your auto-reply to Favorites, it only goes to those people you’re in contact most. If you don’t want anyone to know when you’re in the car, choose No One.
To set an auto-reply, launch Settings on your iPhone
Tap Do Not Disturb
Choose Auto-Reply
Enter a custom reply message.
If you need to get a message through to someone who has DND While Driving active, follow up your first message with a second that only says ‘urgent’.

5/ How to tell if Apple Watch notifications are from a native app or an iPhone app — Sometimes when you get a notification on your Apple Watch, you can tap on it for further options, or to open a corresponding app. At other times, that notification is from your iPhone, and there’s not much you can do with it other than dismiss it.
Here’s how to quickly tell the difference — it’s all in the shape. App icons on watchOS are circles, and when you get a notification from an app that is native to the Apple Watch, tapping on it will open the corresponding app. When an alert arrives, or you are browsing through past ones in Notification Center, the corresponding app icon is located in the upper left. If it’s a circle, tapping once will provide quick options like reply or dismiss, and tapping a second time will open the corresponding app.
But if the icon is a square, that means it’s simply an iPhone notification because app icons on the iPhone are rounded-corner squares.
There aren’t as many options for dealing with notifications not from native watchOS apps. Tap and you’ll have an option to dismiss, with no second tap to open the app, because the app is only on your iPhone.
This subtle distinction of round or square is an easy way to tell what you can do directly from your wrist, without the need to pull your phone out of your pocket.

Five Tip Friday ~ Safari, privacy, wiFi and the Help Viewer


1/ Zoom in Safari using a Magic Trackpad — In the Trackpad or Mouse system preference pane, click the Scroll & Zoom tab, and then you can opt to check or uncheck Smart Zoom. Now, when you double-tap with two fingers, Safari and other apps will zoom the item tapped upon to fill the screen. Two-finger double-tap again, and it zooms back out to the normal view. This zoom remains preserved when you go back a page and back forward.
Apple also offers a systemwide zoom in the Accessibility preference pane: open the pane, select Zoom, and you can opt to enable or disable the Use Scroll Gesture with Modifier Keys to Zoom. (The Control key is the default modifier.)

2/ Prevent tracking in Safari —  macOS High Sierra will have a feature called Intelligent Tracking Prevention, and Sierra already has some anti-tracking abilities. Safari uses machine learning to prevent tracking in the browser, specially cross-site tracking. Open Safari and go to Preferences (press ⌘+,, or Safari > Preferences in the menu).
Click on the Privacy tab in the window that pops up.
You’ll see a new Website Tracking section (shown above) with two items: ‘Prevent cross-site tracking’ and ‘Ask websites not to track me’. The latter is also found in macOS Sierra and is equivalent to a Do Not Track setting. However, most websites won’t voluntarily honour this setting, and aren’t even legally obligated to do so.
(Apple also streamlined cookie blocking in Safari 11. Instead of having the usual settings like Always block, Allow from current website only, Allow from websites I visit, Always allow, in macOS High Sierra you will also just get the option to block all cookies, since Intelligent Tracking Prevention does the rest.)

3/ Use Modifier Keys with Safari history — You can click-and-hold on Safari’s back button to see a list of where you’ve been (above). This lets you quickly jump back to somewhere without hitting that back button several times.
There are a couple of things you can do with this button to make it even cooler: if you’re looking for URLs instead, hold down the Option key on your keyboard before you click and click-and-hold the back button to do just that.
If you want to keep your existing page as a tab or a window before you open something from your history, that’s easy too. Obviously, when you click the back button without holding it, Safari will go back to the last page you visited. Hold down the Shift key on your keyboard and click that button, and the browser will instead open your last page in a new window. If you hold down Command, your last page will open in a new tab.
This Shift-or-Command trick also works if you have the history view open (History menu>Show All History). If you click-and-hold on your back button to bring up that little popover, holding down Shift and choosing any of the pages you visited opens it in a new window; Command opens it in a new tab. This behavior is actually all through Safari: shift-click a bookmark or a history item, and it’ll open in a new window; Command-click a link, and it’ll open in a new tab.
(If your version of Safari isn’t behaving in the way described here, be sure to check out your settings at Safari > Preferences under the Tabs section.)

4/ Changing your WiFi Password on an AirPort device — Sometimes you’ve may want to change your Wi-Fi password – perhaps you gave it to someone you now wish you hadn’t, or maybe your roommate moved out, but you’ve seen them outside your house leeching off your connection. (I’m sure that’s happened to someone.) If you have an Apple router (like a Time Capsule, AirPort Extreme, AirPort Express), it’s really simple to change this.
Launch AirPort Utility (it’s in the Applications > Utilities folder, which you can easily get to using Finder’s Go menu.)
When AirPort Utility opens, click on your AirPort device and choose Edit.
You may have to enter the password for your device to do this; this is usually the same as your Wi-Fi password, but if it’s not, then…uh…just keep on guessing until you figure it out. Fingers crossed. (You might consider going and checking your keychain to see if it’s stored there if you’re having trouble.)
Once you click Edit, choose the Wireless tab at the top. There you’ll find your wireless password.
So just type what you’d like your new one to be into both the first password box and the Verify Password box. Be sure that the ‘Remember this password in my keychain’ choice is on, too, but don’t mess with any other settings there unless you know what you’re doing.
After your options are set, click Update. AirPort Utility will then of course warn you of what you’re about to do, and restart the device – full service will recommence after reboot.
Keep two things in in mind: first, changing your Wi-Fi password doesn’t change your base station device’s password; if you’d like to make that the same, head over to the Base Station tab within AirPort Utility.
Secondly, everything you own that connects to your Wi-Fi – iPhones, iPads, computers, Apple TVs, and printers, for example – will need to be reconnected to your network afterward, so don’t undertake this task lightly as you’ll be typing the new password into all those devices. It’s no fun to spend the evening changing passwords on printers if you haven’t planned for it.

5/ Use Terminal to send the macOS Help Viewer to the back — You can access your Mac’s built-in support info by choosing Help from the menu at the top of any program. There is one irritation, though: the Help Viewer window always sits on top of everything else, even if you switch programs. It will stay in front until you close it (although you can Minimise it into the Dock by clicking the orange button at top left). Staying on top of everything can be frustrating  when you’re attempting to try out a solution that the help pages suggest.
Luckily, you can change this behavior through Terminal (it’s in your Utilities folder inside the Applications folder). To do so, copy the following command…

defaults write com.apple.helpviewer DevMode -bool YES

…and paste it into the Terminal program after the flashing prompt. When the command is pasted in, press Return, and then the Help Viewer window will behave just like most of the other windows on your Mac: if you click on another window or program, it’ll move to the background.
If you decide you want to put things back the way they were, just go back to Terminal, replace the “YES” with “NO” in the command, and press Return:

defaults write com.apple.helpviewer DevMode -bool NO

Five Tip Friday ~ hidden gems in macOS can be genuinely useful


Hello, Mac acolytes, another five fine tips for your Friday.

1/ Two ways to turn on Do Not Disturb — If you’re in the Notification Center (this is under the little 3-lines-3 dots icon at top right of your Mac screen) the already, simply pull down the panel until you see Do Not Disturb. If your Mac supports it, you can also enable Night Shift mode from there.
Alternatively, just Option-click (hold down the Option key on your keyboard and click) the Notification Center icon in the status bar, and Do Not Disturb will turn on.

2/ Rule Launchpad — Do you use Launchpad, the iPad-like app launching interface? I don’t. But if you do, why not set it up how you want to? You can delete apps from your Applications folder using Launchpad, just like you can from the Home Screen on iOS. Simply bring up the Launchpad app, and press the Option key until the apps start wiggling. You’ll see X symbols in the apps you can delete, so go ahead and clean up your Applications folder. (Technically, you should be using an app cleaner, which deletes files elsewhere that are connected to apps in the Applications folder as well, but for little apps, this can be fine.)
Also note this is most unlike the Dock, since deleting an app from the Dock leaves that app safe in Applications – it just removes the quick link  button to the app that the Dock generates for you.

3/ Filter Unread Messages in macOS Mail — The Mail app now allows you to filter your unread messages. At the top of the messages pane, you’ll see a circle with an upside-down triangle. Just click on that little button, and Mail will filter your email, showing you only unread messages.

4/ Quick Look at Documents and Images — The Finder has a Quick Look feature. After you’ve single-clicked on a document, image, or other types of files, press the space bar on your keyboard. A quick preview of that file will show up, along with the option to open it in the correct app. Remember, a single-click selects, a double-click launches – the confusion here is buttons, like items in the Dock,which launch with a single click.
(There’s one more important attribute of buttons in the Dock, by the way – click-and-hold, which displays new and different functions in a pop-out menu.)

5/ Quickly get lyrics to songs in Apple Music — If you’re an Apple Music subscriber and use iTunes on your Mac, you’ll be pleased to know you can access song lyrics without ever leaving the app. If you click the “Up Next” button to the right of the status window, you’ll see a tab for lyrics. Click it …

Five Tip Friday ~ 3 for iOS, 2 for Apple Watch


1/ Make Home Button Touch ID work like it used to — iOS 10 brought a big change to the way the Home Button worked by requiring users to press it, even after your fingerprint has been recognised. But there’s a feature under Settings>General>Accessibility that allows you to make your Home Button work like it used to – it makes your iPhone or iPad with Touch ID unlock with just a touch from the lock screen.
In Settings > General > Accessibility, scroll down until you see the Home Button menu item. Tap it.
In this area, you can change the click speed of the Home Button, and control whether Siri or Voice Dictation activates when you press and hold. But at the bottom, you’ll see a switch called Rest Finger to Open. Tap that. Once enabled, you can open your iPhone with Touch ID the old way: just press your finger against it, instead of having to press it first. This isn’t a full return to iOS’s Slide-to-Unlock, but many users might find it more natural than the default way of doing things.

2/ Vibrate Only for certain events — On your iOS devices, there are settings that control which sounds play for which events, like when an email comes in or you get a text. with an iPhone, you can also choose for certain events to have no associated sounds but to vibrate your device instead. For me, this is really useful: you might like to know right away when you get a text, say, so you will have a sound associated with that, but for emails, no. You can set those to vibrate only (actually, I have email alerts turned off on iPhone, that way I only get them when I check them, which suits me better).
Open the Settings app on your iPhone, then tap Sounds & Haptics.
Under that section are some very useful choices. At the top you can configure whether your device will vibrate when it’s ringing or when it’s on silent. Scroll down a bit to set up which sounds you’d like to hear for which events.

3/ Backing up Voice Memos — Sometimes you can’t beat a quick Voice Memo to record a thought, tune or to-do. But since there is no Voice Memo folder in iCloud Drive, and while memos are part of your iPhone backup (and they also back up to iTunes on Mac./PC if that’s what you prefer as your backup), we can also make use of the share sheet put them somewhere specific.
You can create a folder in iCloud Drive (or your cloud provider of choice) for audio clips. For apple’s free iCloud Drive online storage, chick iCloud on your Mac in the left side of a Finder window and choose New Folder from the File menu. Another option is to create a note or folder in Apple Notes dedicated to voice memos.
On iPhone, go into the Voice Memos app, tap on a recording and hit the share button (shown below). From here, you can select Add to iCloud Drive or Add to Notes.

You can also straight AirDrop them. Tap on a recording and then the share button as above, make sure Bluetooth is enabled on your iPhone and Mac, and you can look for your Mac’s account photo under AirDrop.
If your audio recordings are large in size, using iTunes is another way to share. Connect your iPhone to your Mac, and click the phone symbol on the upper left. Next, click on Apps in the sidebar, and scroll all the way to the bottom until you see Voice Memos. You can then drag and drop your audio clips to any location in your Mac.

4/ Combine watchOS 3.2 ‘Theater Mode’ with ‘Wake Screen on Crown Up’ to discreetly check time on Apple Watch Series 2 — Here’s how to combine the two features. All current Apple Watch hardware has access to the watchOS 3.2 update, which adds the new Theater Mode option in Control Center. To access it, simply swipe up from the bottom of the display on a watch face, and choose the icon depicting comedy and tragedy masks.
But while all Apple Watch users can access theater mode, the next part of the tip is specifically limited to Series 2 hardware. Since the second-generation hardware debuted last September, it has exclusively offered a new feature known as Wake Screen on Crown Up. To enable this feature, open the Apple Watch app on a connected iPhone, choose General, and then Wake Screen. By default, new Apple Watch Series 2 units ship with Wake Screen on Crown Upenabled.
Theater Mode prevents your Apple Watch display from lighting up when your wrist is turned, which can be annoying in a dark movie theatre, for example. Users must instead tap the display in order to check the time.
However, when Wake Screen on Crown Up is enabled, users can also slowly brighten the display by turning the Digital Crown. As the digital crown is rolled forward, the Apple Watch Series 2 screen becomes gradually more visible, allowing users to keep the light from their watch dim – a particularly handy feature for politely checking the time without bothering others, while in a movie theatre or at a play.
After checking the time, users can either roll the Digital Crown back toward them to dim the display until it goes dark, or simply wait about three seconds for the screen to automatically go black.
If you roll the Digital Crown further upwards, the display will become fully “on,” at the normally set brightness, and will not automatically dim as long as your wrist is facing you. In this situation, simply turn your wrist away from you as you normally would, and the display will automatically shut off. Because Theater Mode is enabled, the screen will not automatically turn back on regardless of the orientation of your wrist.
(If you want to be extra polite while at the movies, you can also create a low-light watch face that will make the display even less noticeable. Simply create a new Modular face, set it to red (which helps preserve night vision), and disable all its watch face complications.)

5/ Reining in watchOS — You don’t have to automatically Install Apple Watch Apps. Some of the apps that go along with it may not be that relevant to you. Depending on when you set up your wearable device, it may automatically install all new apps to the Apple Watch. You don’t have to automatically install Apple Watch apps. Apple Watch has a limited amount of storage space, and any music and photos you have take up some of it, so you may want to limit how many apps you install. Secondly, not all of the Watch apps are incredibly useful and you might find yourself wanting to get rid of them.
Open the Watch app on your iPhone
Scroll down and tap General
Flip the toggle switch next to Automatic App Install so it is no longer green
Remove the Apps You Don’t Use
Once you’ve turned off Automatic App Install, you might want to clear out some of the apps you aren’t using. Return to the My Watch screen, and scroll down until you see your list of third-party apps. If you see Installed next to an app, it’s already there. Tap on the apps one at a time. You’ll see a toggle switch for each labeled Show App on Apple Watch. Flip that switch so it’s no longer green. Apple Watch will uninstall that app. When you come across an app you do want to install, just flip that switch so it’s green. Apple Watch will install the app for you to use.

Five Tip Friday ~ Your Mac online with Safari and iCloud


1/ Recover lost tabs and windows in Safari — Some users have a lot of Safari tabs open all the time. For some folks, open tabs are apparently a way to remember to follow up on things or purchase items. It’s much more sensible to use Bookmarks but hey, we’re all different. But if you close a tab and didn’t mean to, the menu item to recover them is under History at the top of your screen.
Within that menu (above), you will see Recently Closed, which will show you tabs and windows you may have dismissed accidentally. Click any single item to reopen that one page.

2/ Reopen Last Closed [Window/Tab] — This does just what it says, and Reopen All Windows from Last Session, which is handy if Safari didn’t restore your tabs after it was quit for whatever reason. (These options may look a little different or say slightly different things depending on exactly how many tabs you closed, for example, but if you’re looking to get back what you lost, this History menu is very handy.
Of course, if all you want is to undo accidentally closing a tab right after you did it, you’d just press Command-Z like you would anywhere else in any Mac operation to undo your last action.  You can also press this key combo multiple times to get back several tabs if you went on a closing frenzy and then came to your senses.

3/ Uploading files from a browser via iCloud — Log into iCloud.com on the computer you’d like to upload files from. Head to Photos if you want to upload images to your iCloud Photo Library or iCloud Drive for all other types of files.
In either place, you’ll see an Upload button at the top of your browser window (indicated above). Choose that, and you’ll get the familiar file-picker dialog box, from which you can navigate to the items you’d like to upload.
How long your upload will take is dependent on the size of the file(s) you select and your internet speed. If you signed in to your iCloud account on a machine that isn’t yours, make sure to log out before you walk away.
The beauty of this trick is most apparent if you’re using iCloud Photo Library or the Mac’s Desktop and Documents syncing feature. In the case of photos, for example, anything you upload to iCloud.com will be immediately distributed to all of your devices if that syncing is turned on.
For iCloud Drive, though, whatever folder you’re looking at online will be where the files you upload end up. So you could navigate to iCloud.com, open iCloud Drive, double-click to view your Desktop folder, and then upload files there. When you get back to your Mac, you’ll see the stuff you uploaded, already on your Desktop and ready to go. [From the Mac Observer.]

4/ Connect to a remote Mac in your Back to My Mac network with macOS Sierra — With macOS Sierra’s Back to My Mac, you can connect to your other Macs securely over the Internet. This is an iCloud feature that lets you set up a network of Macs that you can access remotely.  After you set up each Mac or AirPort base station, you can connect to it remotely.
From the Finder menu, choose Preferences, and click the Sidebar tab.
In the Shared section, select Back to My Mac.
Open a Finder window, and look for the Shared section in the sidebar. If you don’t see any shared computers or base stations, place the pointer over the word Shared and click Show.
Select the remote computer or base station that you want to access and click Connect As. (To share a screen with your remote Mac, select the Mac and click Share Screen.) If you don’t see the Mac or base station that you’re looking for, click All to see a list of available Mac computers and base stations.

5/ Remove a Mac from your Back to My Mac network on macOS Sierra — You can turn off Back to My Mac whenever you want (here’s how you set it up). When you do, you’ll remove that Mac or AirPort base station from your Back to My Mac network.
Follow these steps:
Choose System Preferences from the  menu, then click iCloud.
In iCloud preferences, deselect Back to My Mac to turn it off. You also can click Sign Out to log out of iCloud completely.
To remove a base station, follow these steps:
From the menu bar, choose Go > Utilities and double-click AirPort Utility.
Select the AirPort base station that you don’t want to use anymore, and click Edit. If you don’t see the base station, click Other Wi-Fi Devices to see a list of available base stations. You might need to choose a different Network Interface from the pop-up menu.
Enter the base station password. This password is different from your iCloud password.
Select the Base Station tab.
In the Back to my Mac section, click the – (minus) button and enter the Apple ID you use with Back to My Mac. The green status indicator should disappear, showing that Back to My Mac is turned off.
Click Update to save your changes.

Five Tip Friday ~ Five for iOS


1/ Print to PDF from any app from iPhone and iPad — This trick relies upon a hidden feature of the Share Sheet. To print from any app, such as Safari, you begin by tapping the Share icon. Next, tap the Print icon from the bottom row of the Share Sheet. Depending on what you’ve enabled, you might have to scroll to the right to find it. Now, to access the PDF view, simply 3D Touch (or pinch together two fingers to zoom out, in no0n-3D Touch devices) in the preview area of the PDF.
With that done, you should be in a PDF view of your document, web page, or whatever. Your next step is to share it. Just tap the Share icon, and choose where you want to send your PDF. You can share it via Messages or Mail, or any other app that supports the Share Sheet extensions.

Another great option is iBooks, if you want to keep all of your PDFs together, but there’s often a Share Sheet icon there to do that directly. But you can even save the PDF file to your iCloud drive or Dropbox.
Saving the web pages you’ve visited to PDF is a great way to keep notes when you’re researching. Other options for where to save those PDF files include Evernote and even the built-in Notes app.

2/ Use the Remote app to control your iTunes library in macOS Sierra with your iDevice — If you have an iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch you can use the Apple Remote app — free from the Apple App Store — to control your Mac’s iTunes library from a distance.
First, pair the app with the iTunes library (or libraries) you want to control. Your device and your computer must be on the same wireless network.
If you have Remote 2.0 (or later) and Home Sharing is turned on, you can set Remote to pair automatically with any of the iTunes libraries on your Home Sharing network. You can also pair Remote directly with iTunes libraries that aren’t in your Home Sharing network. To pair the Remote with an iTunes library: Tap Remote on your device’s Home screen.
Tap Add an iTunes Library.
A 4-digit code appears.
Open iTunes on your computer and click the Remote button .
Type the 4-digit code in the iTunes window.
iTunes pairs the library on your computer with the Remote app on your device.
Pair Remote with your Home Sharing network.
To use Remote 2.0 (or later) with Home Sharing, every iTunes library you want to control must have Home Sharing turned on.
Tap Remote on your device’s Home screen.
Tap Settings.
Tap to turn Home Sharing on.
Type your Apple ID and password, and tap Done.
Tap the iTunes library or Apple TV you want to control.

3/ Use Home Sharing to import items from another iTunes library — You can use Home Sharing to import items from up to five iTunes libraries on other computers on your home network? You can (assuming you have an Apple ID).
When you use your Mac on your Home Sharing network to download an item from the iTunes Store, you can have the item download automatically to other computers on your Home Sharing network.
Turn on Home Sharing. Choose File > Home Sharing > Turn On Home Sharing.
Type in your Apple ID and password, and click Turn On Home Sharing.
If you don’t have an Apple ID, click “Don’t have an Apple ID?” and follow the onscreen instructions.
To import items from other libraries using Home Sharing, choose a computer on your Home Sharing network from the Library pop-up menu. The library loads and a list of categories appears.
Choose a category (Music, for example). In the Show menu at the bottom of the iTunes window, choose “Items not in my library.” Select the items you want to import, and click Import.
To automatically import new iTunes Stores purchases from another computer, choose a computer on your Home Sharing network from the Library pop-up menu. Choose a category (Music, for example).
Click Settings at the bottom of the window. In the window that appears, select “Automatically transfer new purchases from Library Name.” Select the types of items you want to import. Click OK.
To turn off Home Sharing, on each computer, choose File > Home Sharing > Turn Off Home Sharing. If a shared computer doesn’t appear when Home Sharing is on, turn Home Sharing off, and then turn it on again.

4/ Disable homescreen rotation on Apple’s Plus-series iPhones — By default, Apple’s iPhone 6 Plus, 6s Plus, and 7 Plus add an auto-rotating home screen to iOS, rearranging icons and the dock whenever a device is tilted sideways.
Aside from the Control Center orientation lock, here’s an indirect way of achieving the same result:
Within the Settings app, tap on Display & Brightness, then on “View” under the Display Zoomcategory towards the very bottom. Nominally this option just makes it easier to browse and tap on icons. As a consequence of using it, however, the home screen will no longer rotate.
To make the switch, tap on ‘Zoomed,’ then on ‘Set.’ Technically an iPhone has to reset to apply the change, but unlike a normal reboot this should only take several seconds.
That’s it — to reverse course, go back to the Display Zoom menu and select ‘Standard’ instead. The above method works in iOS 9 and 10.
Note that at least some apps, like Apple Messages, will continue to rotate their own interfaces even with Display Zoom on, and there may be no way of disabling this within an app’s settings. [From AppleInsider.]

5/ Using 3D Touch — If you have iPhone 6s or later, you may not be using 3D Touch, a more pressured press on the screen that releases a wealth of extra possibilities, for example when you are typing:
The first time you 3D Touch anywhere on the keyboard, you can start dragging the cursor around to place it in a specific spot. It’s a great way to get exact placement without fidgeting with your finger.
But, if you don’t lift your finger after that first 3D Touch and do it again, you’ll select the adjacent full word. 3D Touch one more time without lifting, and you’ll select the entire sentence surrounding the cursor. These extra actions take a little practice, but they’re darn handy once you get them down. [Here are a whole lot more handy 3D Touch features, from the Mac Observer.]

 

Five Tip Friday ~ Sharing locations, closing all apps, Safari reader and DNS in iOS


1/ Share your location quickly from the Maps app — It’s pretty quick to share your location in Messages, but sometimes you’re in the Maps app when you suddenly think ‘it would be great to tell so-n-so this is where I am, or will be…’ and to be able to do this via other apps like Mail, as well.
Luckily, this is possible.
In the Maps app, navigate to the location you want to pin and share. Tap and hold on that location until the round red pin flag appears (shown at left).
To fine-tune the location, tap on Edit Location – now you can drag the map around until the pin is exactly where you want it.
Anyway, once you’ve got it where you want it, tap Done to go back to the main map screen.)
Now tap the Share button (marked above, at lower right) to send out the pin location to whoever you want, via Messages, Mail, Twitter, Facebook, or with any other app with its Sharing Sheet extension turned on.

2/ Share your GPS coordinates — To get really geeky, you can also share your precise geographical coordinates. Open up the Compass app and wait a few seconds. Your latitude and longitude should appear at the bottom of the screen. Tap and hold on the coordinates, and then choose Copy: you can now paste your coordinates into a text message, email or anywhere else.

After you double-click your Home button, you can swipe left and right through running apps to quickly change to another (tap on the one you want) or swipe upwards to ‘quit’ them (stop them using your iDevice’s resources, RAM, data etc)

3/ Close all running apps in one hit — This is contentious with some claiming it’s not necessary. But I’m firmly in the camp that having dozens of apps running at once makes your iDevice laggy, since apps don’t automatically quit when you can’t see them on iPhone/iPad. In other words, having an app running, then pressing the Home button to launch another app, actually leaves that first app running until you can have dozens of apps all running at once – you can see this by double-clicking the Home button, from which view you can swipe apps upwards to actually quit them, or swipe left and right to go through them and tap the ones you want to work or play in again.
But the following process suspends all your apps, freeing up memory and processor time:
• Press the Sleep/Wake button until you see the slider to shut down your iPhone.
• Now press and hold the Home Button for approximately five seconds, or until you are returned to either your Lock or Home Screen…
That’s it, your apps have all been suspended. If you double-press the Home Button, you’ll still see each of them still listed as if they are running, and they’re still instantly available form this view, but you might notice these apps actually refresh (or relaunch) when you tap on them. That’s because they’ve actually been properly suspended, freeing up memory.

4/ Shared Links in iOS Safari — Shared Links is a tab that’s been around since iOS 7, but was used to just support Twitter accounts. Now the feature also supports RSS feeds. To get to the shared links, tap on the Bookmarks button at the bottom row of Safari. Next, tap on the tab with the “@” sign, and you’ll be in your Shared Links. One of the first feeds that will show up in Shared Links, if you have signed into the social media network in the Settings app, is your Twitter timeline. Long-hold on that Bookmarks button, and a new menu pops up with Add Bookmark, Add to Reading List and Add to Shared Links. Tap on that last one, and voilà, the RSS feed for the page you’re looking shows up.
If Add to Shared Links doesn’t appear, try going to an article on that site instead of the home page. The Shared Links option will often appear then.

5/ Easily change your DNS — This won’t apply to most people, but it’s possible to change your DNS address to access more online than your typical ISP might allow. DNS stands for Domain Name System, the type of system used to name any device or service connected to the internet. It translates numerical IP addresses to more human-friendly names (ie, to http://www.mac-nz.com). Your browser requests are sent to a DNS server controlled by a third party – usually this would be your ISP. But it’s possible for your ISP to know which websites you visit, but also censor websites it doesn’t like. Thankfully, there are DNS services that are committed to privacy and defeating censorship. Assuming you know some of these like OpenNicProject: you will need the DNS addresses: a series of numbers separated by full stops.
Open the Settings app on your iOS device and navigate to Wi-Fi and find the network you’re connected to. Tap the blue “i” to the right of it. This is where you see the network settings.
Look for the section called DNS. You can tap on the empty space, and type in the DNS primary and secondary server. Type in the primary address first, followed by a comma (no space), then the secondary server address.

Five Tip Friday ~ smarter Sends from Mail, Do Not Disturb, folders for Notes, text selection


1/ Automatically select best account to send from in Mac Mail — Apple Mail received a new feature in Sierra that automatically chooses the best account for you to send a new message from, based on who your email is addressed to and what mailbox and message you had selected when you started composing.
To turn this on (or off) open Mail’s Preferences from the menus at the top. Use the Composing Tab in Mail Preferences to access your settings for sending messages. Under the Composing tab, you’ll see a drop-down next to “Send new messages from.” Pick that to view your options.
You might almost always want to send from your work email address, but if you want to try out letting Apple Mail pick for you, then toggle that drop-down to “Automatically select best account.”

2/ Enable Do Not Disturb in macOS to silence notifications — Notifications can be a mixed blessing. For some they keep the chaos of communications down and allow for rapid response to an email or a Tweet, but for others they can be an annoying distraction.
You can silence notifications until midnight quickly, with a single click. To get that done, option-click (hold down the Option key on your keyboard while you click) on the Notifications icon in the upper-right hand corner of the desktop.
To show that Notifications are muted, the icon becomes greyed out. When the icon is greyed, you can still invoke the Notifications tray by clicking on the icon again — but this won’t un-mute them.
To do so, either pop open the Notifications tray and turn them back on with the toggle, or option-click on the Notifications icon in the menubar again.

3/ Who can and can’t bother you — If you want more precise control over what gets to bother you, delve into the settings of the feature itself.
Select System Preferences from the apple Menu (or from the Dock). In the upper right hand corner of the system preferences, select Notifications. From this menu, most parameters of Notification Center are set. Setting the schedule for notifications to not bother you at all during working hours is a good solution for the easily distracted.
There are other settings here, such as the ability to turn them off when the the display is being mirrored for a presentation, or to allow for a particularly persistent caller to break though your need to not be disturbed.
However, another option to quiet the tumult is to tell the most frequent offender to not pop up a notification. Select whatever app you wish to silence from the left hand column, and turn it off, or pare down when it will yell at you.

4/ Set folders in the Notes app — There aren’t a lot of ways to organize notes in Apple Notes, which became so much more powerful in Yosemite. But you can set folders and subfolders – clock the Elis icon at lower left in the Notes window to create a folder. There’s no obvious way to create a subfolder, but in fact all you do is drag one folder into another.
Keep in mind that if you delete a folder, then all of the subfolders and notes will also be deleted.
(Unfortunately, it’s not possible to create subfolders in iOS Notes.But if you create your subfolders on macOS, and do sync over to iOS.)

5/ Text selection tricks — Clicking anywhere within text in a document places your cursor there for deleting or adding to what you’ve written. While you can click and drag to select text, sometimes this means you miss a few letters. If you want to just select one word, it’s much faster to double-click it.
A triple-click selects the entire paragraph your cursor is on.
More sophisticated still: hold that final click and move your cursor – the selection jumps by full words or full paragraphs each time … no missing letters!