Tag Archives: collaboration

Five Tip Friday ~ macOS High Sierra and collaboration


1/ How to work on files together in macOS High Sierra — It’s easy to work on files together in macOS High Sierra. When you share a file in iCloud Drive, you and your team can all work in the same document – and never wonder who has the latest version.
Open the Finder, then choose iCloud Drive or a folder you’re syncing to iCloud (such as Desktop or Documents). Select a file (sorry, you can’t share a folder) and click the share button atop the window. Or just right-click a file and then click Share. You’ll see an Add People option in the share menu.
You can use Mail, Messages, Twitter, Facebook, AirDrop. When you select one of these options, a link to your file will be sent instead of an attachment.
There’s also a Copy Link button on the Add People menu. It lets you copy the link to a file to your clipboard to paste when you wish.

2/ Share notes form iBooks and macOS High Sierra — iBooks started in iOS, and the ability to share or export notes is a little better on iOS than it is in macOS High Sierra. Still, it’s not as intuitive or obvious as it should be.
Start with a note. To view all notes you have added to the book (ie an iBook in the iBooks app), tap the table of contents icon, then the Notes tab at the top. But you have to Tap Edit Notes > Select All. The notes get a check mark from being selected, and the Share button lights up. When you tap Share, you get a new menu with one option by default: Mail. Tap the Mail icon, and an email sheet will open where you can decide where to send it.
You can share notes from iBooks in macOS High Sierra, too, but it’s even less obvious. First, get to your notes by tapping the Notes icon. Click on a note to select it. If you then right click on the note (you can also just right-click to select in the first place), you get the option to Copy, or to share via Mail, Messages, Notes, Twitter, or Facebook, as shown below.
Here’s the bad news: you can only export/share one note at a time. While you can shift-click or option-slick to select multiple notes at one time, rick clicking on any of them deselects all but the one you’re right-clicking on. You’d have to share one note at a time and then copy-paste each of them into an email or other app to share them all at once.

3/ Pin a note to the top of your list in macOS High Sierra — Remember that Notes syncs across devices and Macs signed into the same iCloud account already, so it’s already ‘collaborative’. If you have a note that you update often, like a to-do list or shared brainstorm? You can pin it to the top of a list in macOS High Sierra.
Launch the Notes app and choose a note.
Click on File in the App menu at the upper left of the screen, then choose Pin Note.
The note is always easy to find. It will remain at the top of your list under a section called Pinned Notes, no matter what changes you make to the rest of your notes, or on which device. Pinned notes sync across all of your devices connected with the same iCloud account.
To unpin a note, launch the Notes app and choose a pinned note. Click on File in the App menu, and select Unpin Note.

4/ Use Keyboard Shortcuts in Apple Notes — You can use keyboard shortcuts in Apple Notes. It’s really fast to navigate and perform tasks on your Mac with keys, so try to do this whenever you can, at least when doing tasks in an app. Here’s a list of the commands.

5/ Use your iPhone or iPad as an Audio Input on your Mac — Your iPhone is a powerful communication device, so what if you want to play or record some of the audio from it through your Mac—like maybe for a podcast you’re recording. Turns out it’s easy and your Mac can even see your iPhone as just another audio input source. Read on to learn how to set it up.
To play audio from your iPhone or iPad you’ll need to a Lightning to USB cable, like the one that came with your device for charging and syncing. Connect your iPhone or iPad to your Mac with the cable, and then launch Audio Midi Setup on your computer. It’s in Applications/Utilities.
Use Audio Midi Setup to turn your iPhone into a new input source on your Mac
Now select your iPhone or iPad from the device list on the left and click Enable. Your iPhone or iPad will show up as a new input source in Sound Preferences so any audio playing on the device will play through your speakers, headphones, or other selected audio out device on your Mac.
This is a cool and easy way to use the audio on your iPhone in a podcast without having to find a way to first export it. The only limitation is that phone calls won’t play out – so you can’t use this as a way to record conversations.

Five Tip Friday ~ Pages, Keynote, Numbers collaboration and more on macOS and iOS


Yes it’s Good Friday already in New Zealand, and yes I’m up, and yes I am going to work, as the museum I work at only closes on Christmas Day. Luckily I have time to add some tips for you.
By default, people that you invite can edit your document, but the initial sharer can change share options and limit who can access it (from Apple World Today).

1/ Apple’s Pages, Numbers and Keynote apps for macOS and iOS allow you to collaborate — You can invite others to your documents and work on them together in real time. Here’s how to use iWork collaboration on a Mac with macOS Sierra and Pages 6.0, Numbers 4.0, or Keynote 7.0 or later;
An iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch with iOS 10 and Pages 3.0, Numbers 3.0, or Keynote 3.0 or later;
A Mac with Safari 6.0.3 or later, or Google Chrome 27.0.1 or later;
and even on a Windows PC with Internet Explorer 11 or later, or Google Chrome 27.0.1 or later.
To invite others to collaborate you must be signed in to iCloud on your device and have iCloud Drive turned on. If you’re using a web browser, sign in to iCloud.com and open the iWork app you want to use.
If you have an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch with earlier versions of iOS or iWork apps, or if you have an Android device, you can view documents but can’t edit them.
When you invite people to collaborate on a document, spreadsheet, or presentation, the app creates an iCloud.com link for you to send to them. If you limit access so that only people you invite can collaborate on your document, they must sign in to iCloud or iCloud.com with their Apple ID. The name of the document is included in the URL. If the title or content of the document is confidential, make sure to ask participants not to forward the link to anyone else.
Here’s how to invite other people from your Mac. From Pages, Numbers, or Keynote, open the document you want to share. In the toolbar, click the share icon — a head with a checkmark by it.
Tap Add People to add people. Tap your preferred method for sending the link. If you choose to email your invitation, type an email address or phone number for each person you want to invite. Add any other information, then send or post the message.
The share icon — a head with a checkmark by it —  indicates that a document is shared. The checkmark changes to show how many people have the document open (not including you).

 

2/ Collaborating in iOS — Here’s how to invite other folks from your iPhone, iPad or iPod touch: if your document is already open in Pages, Numbers, or Keynote, tap the three dot icon, then tap Collaborate With Others. If you’re in the Document Manager, tap the share icon,  then tap Collaborate With Others. Tap the document you want to share. If the document you select hasn’t downloaded to your device, it downloads now.

3/ Protect with a password — If you set Who Can Access to ‘Anyone with the link, and you want to add a password, tap Add Password. Type your password and hint. You and other participants need this password to open the document.

4/ Invite other people from iCloud.com — If your document is already open in Pages, Numbers, or Keynote for iCloud, click the share icon in the toolbar. If you’re in the Document Manager, select a document, then click the icon that looks like a gear. Now choose Collaborate With Others.

5/ Password protect iWork documents anyway — Here’s how to password-protect Pages, Numbers, Keynote docs in macOS Sierra: From Pages, Keynote or Numbers, open the document that you want to secure with a password.
Go to the File menu and choose Select Set Password.
Enter a password and a hint.
That’s it! As you set a password, a small lock icon will appear on that particular document indicating that it’s secured with a password. The next time you need to access the doc on any Apple device or via iCloud, you’ll be asked for a password.