Category Archives: Mac News

New Mac mini! 5 times faster, quad- and 6-core processors, up to 64GB RAM, all-flash storage


Apple today gave Mac mini a massive increase in performance — Now with quad- and 6-core processors, up to 64GB of faster memory and blazing fast all-flash storage, the new Mac mini delivers an insane five times faster performance, making it the most powerful Mac mini ever made.1 And with Thunderbolt 3 ports, the Apple T2 Security Chip and a 10Gb Ethernet option, the new Mac mini is a faster and more capable desktop that can do so much more.
It has more than five times the performance, up to 6-core desktop-class processors, the Apple T2 Security Chip, faster memory up to 64GB, high‑performance all-flash storage, and is packed with advanced ports including four Thunderbolt 3, two USB-A, HDMI video, audio and Ethernet up to 10 Gbps. All of this power is packed into the same-sized enclosure as before, perfect for customers updating or creating all‑new installations where Mac mini is the ideal solution.

Five times faster and more powerful than ever — Now with quad- and 6-core eighth-generation Intel Core processors with Turbo Boost speeds up to 4.6GHz and Intel UHD graphics, Mac mini delivers up to five times faster performance than the previous generation.1 Mac mini now rips through traditional desktop tasks like photo and video editing, music creation and software development, and crushes pro workflows including video transcoding, code compiling and live musical performances. And with up to 64GB of 2666 MHz memory, Mac mini can load larger files into memory, run more virtual machines and manipulate even larger datasets. Every Mac mini now features the speed and reliability of all-flash storage. With capacities up to 2TB, the SSD storage on Mac mini is up to four times faster, so working with large files and opening apps is quicker than ever.1

The Apple T2 Security Chip comes to Mac mini — The Apple T2 Security Chip brings industry-leading security to your Mac mini. The T2 Security Chip features an SSD controller with on-the-fly data encryption so everything stored on the SSD is automatically and fully encrypted. The Secure Enclave in the T2 Security Chip ensures that software loaded during the boot process has not been tampered with. The T2 Security Chip also features HEVC video transcoding that’s up to an incredible 30 times faster, enabling pro users to work more quickly with higher-resolution video throughout their workflow.1

Higher-performance I/O with Thunderbolt 3 and 10Gb Ethernet — With four Thunderbolt 3 ports — twice as many Thunderbolt ports as the previous generation and each with double the performance — the new Mac mini can connect to high-speed storage, 4K and 5K Thunderbolt displays and output video in three formats. Mac mini also features an HDMI 2.0 port, two USB-A ports, an audio jack and Gigabit Ethernet, so it can connect to almost anything. And for remarkably fast networking performance, Mac mini offers a 10Gb Ethernet option for the first time.

100 per cent recycled aluminium enclosure and a smaller carbon footprint — Now in a gorgeous new space grey finish, every new Mac mini enclosure uses an Apple‑designed aluminium alloy made from 100 per cent recycled aluminium for the first time, which has the same strength, durability and beautiful finish as the aluminium in all Apple products.2 The Mac mini also features the use of more post-consumer recycled plastic in parts like the foot. All together, these advancements help to reduce the carbon footprint of the new Mac mini by nearly 50 per cent.3

macOS Mojave — All new Macs come with macOS Mojave, the latest version of the world’s most advanced desktop operating system, with new features inspired by pros, but designed for everyone. In macOS Mojave, Dark Mode transforms the desktop with a dramatic new look that puts the focus on your content. The new Stacks feature organises messy desktops by automatically stacking files into neat groups. Familiar iOS apps — including News, Stocks, Voice Memos and Home — are now available on Mac for the first time. FaceTime now adds support for group calling, and the Mac App Store gets a full redesign featuring rich editorial content and apps from top developers like Microsoft and Adobe.

Pricing and availability — Starting at a recommended retail price of NZ$1449 inc. GST, the new Mac mini is available to order today on apple.com/nz. It will also be available through Apple Authorised Resellers starting on Wednesday, 7 November. Additional technical specifications, configure-to-order options and accessories are available online at http://www.apple.com/nz/mac.

1 Testing conducted by Apple in October 2018 using preproduction 3.2GHz 6-core Intel Core i7–based Mac mini systems with 64GB of RAM and a 2TB SSD, and shipping 3.0GHz dual-core Intel Core i7–based Mac mini systems with 16GB of RAM and a 1TB SSD. Performance tests are conducted using specific computer systems and reflect the approximate performance of Mac mini.
2 Recycled material claim applies to the enclosure.
3 Based on Product Greenhouse Gas Life Cycle Assessment. See our Product Environmental Reports for more information.

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All-New MacBook Air Takes Flight


Apple introduced an all-new MacBook Air today in New York, bringing a stunning 13-inch Retina display, Touch ID, the latest processors and an even more portable design to the world’s most loved notebook. Delivering the all-day battery life it’s known for, the new MacBook Air is available in three gorgeous finishes — gold, silver and space grey. The most affordable Mac with a Retina display also includes an Apple-designed keyboard, a spacious Force Touch trackpad, faster SSDs, wide stereo sound, the Apple T2 Security Chip and Thunderbolt 3, making the new MacBook Air the perfect notebook to take with you everywhere you go.
Philip Schiller, Apple’s senior vice president of Worldwide Marketing. “Redesigning MacBook Air started with a stunning Retina display and all-day battery life, and then we added Touch ID and the Apple T2 Security Chip, the latest processors, incredible sound, the third-generation keyboard and Force Touch trackpad, high-speed Thunderbolt 3 ports and of course macOS Mojave, in a beautiful, thinner, lighter, all-aluminium design that a whole new generation of MacBook Air customers are going to love.”

Retina Display Comes to MacBook Air — The new MacBook Air features a stunning 13.3-inch Retina display with over 4 million pixels of resolution so text and images in macOS Mojave look sharp and stunning. And with 48 per cent more colour than the previous generation, images are more lifelike than ever. The new MacBook Air also includes a built-in FaceTime HD camera, which is perfect for Group FaceTime calls with friends and family members, as well as a three microphone array for better sound quality when making calls and improved voice recognition in Siri.

Featuring Touch ID and the Apple T2 Security Chip — MacBook Air now includes Touch ID — a fingerprint sensor built into the keyboard — which allows you to conveniently and instantly unlock your MacBook Air; authenticate your identity; and make fast, simple and secure purchases using Apple Pay. To support Touch ID, MacBook Air comes with the Apple T2 Security Chip, which makes your notebook far more secure. Its Secure Enclave protects Touch ID information and ensures that software loaded during the boot process has not been tampered with. The T2 Security Chip also features an SSD controller with on-the-fly data encryption for everything stored on the SSD. These allow MacBook Air to offer the most secure boot process and storage of any notebook. The T2 Security Chip features an always-on processor that enables Hey Siri, letting you use just your voice to ask Siri for things like finding files or opening an app.

Latest Generation Keyboard and Industry’s Best Trackpad — MacBook Air features a third-generation Apple-designed keyboard for more precise and responsive typing. Each key is individually backlit using low-power LEDs for more accurate illumination. The new MacBook Air also includes the industry-best Force Touch trackpad, which delivers pressure-sensing capabilities and haptic feedback. It’s also 20 per cent larger than the trackpad on the previous-generation MacBook Air, offering a quieter and more capable trackpad experience.

Fuller, More Immersive Audio Experience — With more advanced speakers and audio processing technology, MacBook Air delivers a higher-quality audio experience and wide stereo playback that makes watching movies and listening to music more immersive than ever. The speakers are 25 per cent louder with twice as much bass as the previous generation, for more dynamic range and fuller sound.1

Performance to Power Your Daily Activities — The new MacBook Air features an 8th generation Intel Core i5 processor, Intel UHD graphics and faster 2133 MHz system memory up to 16GB, delivering the performance you need for everyday activities like organising your photos, browsing the web, creating presentations, or viewing and editing videos. MacBook Air also features SSDs up to 1.5TB in capacity, that are up to 60 per cent faster than the previous generation and make launching apps and opening files feel snappier and more responsive.1

Thunderbolt 3, the Most Versatile Port Ever — MacBook Air now comes with two Thunderbolt 3 ports, so you can charge your notebook; quickly transfer data via USB and Thunderbolt; output video in three formats; and connect to a whole host of devices including external storage, docks for additional ports, 4K and 5K displays, and eGPUs for faster graphics. It’s the most versatile port ever. The ecosystem has over 700 Thunderbolt 3 devices and counting, along with thousands of USB-C devices, so MacBook Air allows you to take advantage of a whole new generation of accessories.

All-New, More Portable Design and The Greenest Mac Ever — The new MacBook Air packs all of these features in a new, distinctive wedge-shaped design that’s now even more compact and portable. And it delivers up to 12 hours of battery life during wireless web use and up to 13 hours of iTunes movie playback.2 Featuring a significantly smaller footprint, the new MacBook Air takes up 17 per cent less volume, is 10 per cent thinner measuring just 1.56 centimetres at its thickest point, and at just 1.25 kilograms it’s 100 grams lighter than the previous generation.
In addition, the new MacBook Air enclosure is made from a custom, Apple-designed aluminium alloy that enables the use of 100 per cent recycled aluminium for the first time, which has the same strength, durability and beautiful finish as the aluminium in all Apple products.3 Using this custom aluminium alloy helps reduce MacBook Air’s carbon footprint by nearly 50 per cent, making it the greenest Mac ever.4

Radeon Pro Vega Graphics Coming to MacBook Pro Next Month — Apple also announced new MacBook Pro graphics options that will bring powerful Radeon Pro Vega graphics to MacBook Pro for the first time. These new graphics options deliver up to 60 per cent faster graphics performance for the most demanding video editing, 3D design and rendering workloads.

Pricing and Availability — Starting at a recommended retail price of NZ$2149 inc. GST, the new MacBook Air is available to order today on apple.com/nz. It will be available through Apple Authorised Resellers starting on Wednesday, 7 November. Additional technical specifications, configure-to-order options and accessories are available online at http://www.apple.com/nz/mac.
The new graphics configuration option for MacBook Pro will be available to order on apple.com/nz and through Apple Authorised Resellers starting on Wednesday, 14 November.

Testing conducted by Apple in October 2018 using preproduction 1.6GHz dual-core Intel Core i5-based MacBook Air systems with 8GB of RAM and 256GB SSD.
The wireless web test measures battery life by wirelessly browsing 25 popular websites with display brightness set to 12 clicks from bottom or 75 per cent. Battery life varies by use and configuration. See http://www.apple.com/nz/batteries for more information.
Recycled material claim applies to the enclosure and is based on auditing done by UL LLC.
Based on Product Greenhouse Gas Life Cycle Assessment. See our product environmental reports for more information.

Photo Lemur 2.1.1


Photo Lemur, the one-stop photo improvement app, has sped up a little in its latest version and improved the algorithms it uses to analyse, and then fix an image.
A slider along the bottom lets you decide how much ‘improvement’ Photo Lemur can deliver, from 0 to 100%. This is the least sophisticated tool as far as the user goes: no layers, selections, replacement or other area-by-area corrections are available; no brushes, correction tools, multiple undoes … almost no tools at all.
The interface is dauntingly simple (to those used to Photoshop). Open Photo Lemur and drop an image onto the Photo Lemur import window (left), and the app analyses the image (the wireframe animations as per the main image above, I suspect, are arbitrary rather than working, so you know things are happening).
The image opens, and you can drag a vertical Before and After slider to see what your image is like and what it could be like, which is invariably quite an improvement, lightening dark areas and showing otherwise hidden detail, and adding sparkle and contrast to better lit areas. Drag this slider left and right to to inspect your image.
Click the little paintbrush icon at bottom right, and the Boost level slider is revealed. What you saw in the After section is the 100% boost, so you can back off down to what you feel is a more acceptable level if that works better for you.

But does it work? Yes, and often the result is truly remarkable (click an image for a closer look). For a badly degraded, overexposed or faulty shot, there’s a limit to what it can do, but honestly, iPhones simply don’t deliver those kinds of results any more, since they also analyse the scene and balance the white point and exposure faster than the blink of an eye. That means 99% of the shots you send this app’s way will be improved with added sparkle, depth, detail and clarity to make them really ‘pop’.

This even applies to those images shot in low light, which feature noise in the darker areas as an unavoidable consequence of the way CCD sensors work when there simply isn’t enough light for a decent exposure.

Click Export to see several useful options: you can export back to Disk (your hard drive, or a connected hard drive) or choose to upload directly to Flickr, email it, add it directly to Facebook, tweet it or launch it into Snapheal, should you have it, so you can do those area-by-area corrections that Photo Lemur does not support.

Small frustrations — If you open several images at once, you can’t seem to resize the image you are working on to see it in more detail, as there’s no Zoom. Also, the window is not resizable. When you use the Boost slider, you’re actually subtracting, or at least selectively minimising the boost,. It means ‘Set Amount of Boost’ rather than Boost. And when you do this, the Before and After slider disappears – I’d prefer it if it stayed

Conclusion — This is like a more sophisticated, more analytical and more thorough version of the Enhance wand you can single-tap in the Photos app on iPhone and iPad, with the added feature that you can back off from the maximum level of change to the point where you think it’s best. It’s basic, interface-wise, sure, but with it’s smart background tech, works a treat to enhance your images in a much more sophisticated way considering most of its magic is hidden from view.

What’s Great — Improves most images you throw at it, without you having to do all of the legwork.

What’s Not — when you have several images open, you have a limited working space. Confusing payment options: for a while this was Subscriber, then it was a single price … often gets heavily discounted and specially offered, so look out for that (for example, Photo Lemur 2.2 ‘Spectre’ is currently 70% off until 4th January).

Needs — Those who feel their general shots are a little lacking. Photo Lemur is a very fast way to add considerable zing! to images. Its stock price is incredibly steep until you realise how much time and work it can save you.
Check out the developer’s How It Works page.

Photo Lemur 2.2 Spectre, usually US$151 (NZ$215) but US$45 (cNZ$64) until 4th January).
There’s also a Free Version,, for which you have to put in a name and email address. This is for those who want to try Photolemur before buying it. It’s limited and puts the product logo in the photo.

Online only— Visit the Photo Lemur site.

 

More comments on the changes at Mac NZ


Oh Mark: I will miss you!!! I read every post—not always with comprehension—but I read them. Of course I understand the overload—your productivity is prodigious. You could write a history of technology development from your posts.
I’m guessing the Museum of Transport and Technology is taking all your time. And I have learned so much from reading what you write! Thank you for it all. And for your individual help to me.
And good good wishes for what you are turning towards. Best, …

Congratulations! On your achievements over the years, on your even handed reviews and comments on Apple related happenings, on beautifully composed MagBytes.
Boy, I’m going to miss my daily fix! I reckon my wife will be happy I won’t spend quite so long at the computer.
Have also appreciated the times when your responses to my queries have been so promptly dealt with.
So from this almost 80 year old, a great big thank you!

Thanks Mark for all your effort. Really appreciate all the tips and tricks you have shared over the years. Made my working life way more efficient. Good luck with your next venture and work at MOTAT.

Hey Mark, I couldn’t let this sad day pass without sending a message of gratitude. Knowing how time and energy-consuming this must have been for you, I totally understand your decision.
We are all richer, wiser and certainly more Mac-knowledgeable due to your efforts and contributions.
All the very best and if I ever meet you, I owe you a drink!
Kindest regards, …

I too enjoyed reading your site and learned some Apple tips via your Five Tip Friday posts. So thanks for all that you work you put in.
Glad to know that you are now employed by MOTAT, which is one of my favourite places to visit in Auckland. I have been there a few times and would love to re-visit.
Shame on Apple for doing what it did for you. But I really appreciate the work you did and I am grateful for that.

No more MagBytes, no more Apple news


Hi there and goodbye-ish — as I explained in MagBytes 93 that I released yesterday, I have no more time for monthly MagBytes (at least 8 hours work) and for daily Apple news updates and for weekly Friday tips. My working life has taken over, and since Apple no longer shows me products, I no longer feel qualified to talk about them.

It’s been a fun and rewarding pastime; thank you for your attention and support over the last ten years.

Here are some of the reactions (senders’ names withheld):

Like a lot of people I for one am very sorry to see it go. I totally understand your decision and I bet it took a lot of thought before you came to this end.
Always looked forward to all your communications, even had an alert in my calendar to remind me to check if needed. I could never understand how in the world you kept it all up, as some of your replies came very late at night. So although I am sorry to not get Magbytes any more, I say go for it.
One door closes, another one opens is a saying that does seem to happen.
I hope we can stay friends and when I have said thank you in the past, I really meant it, for  I felt you must have been up against it sometimes.
All the best.

The whole world is ‘changing’ it seems… so you are no exception to the avant-garde.  
Thank you for the excellent information received over the years since we met. I have all your Magbytes on file for easy access to the Apple world when, like you, time permits, for my limited knowledge to decipher.
Just a thought.. for the moments of your creative imagination… many of us in the Apple world need someone like you to set up an Apple training school on line. ‘We’… the Apple lovers of the older generation… have the toys, but do not have the school or the skill of the teenagers. But we’ll pay to learn. Could you put your Apple training school online… you’d only need to update when something really new comes out. So please consider…PLEASE!
Wishing you all the best at MOTAT… Christmas… 2018… and…the new online adventure!

Hi Mark,
As one of the many people who have benefited from your expertise over the years I’d like to thank you.
Every time I’ve asked you for advice or information I’ve had a quick and useful reply.
Not being that tech savvy, but having owned a Mac since about 1992, in the past few years I’ve come to rely on MagBytes to keep me up to date with current advice and information.
It seems to me a real shame you cannot continue use your talents as a Mac ambassador.
My retirement field is photography and we visit MOTAT as a source of interesting subjects. Hopefully next time I can say hello.
Once again thanks for making such a valuable contribution to my technical life and good luck for the future.
If you ever start up again please let me know.
Best wishes.

Hi Mark,
Well a sad day today with the news you are stopping your daily Mac info etc.
I for one have appreciated all the work you  have done here and for the advice you have given me in times of trouble or needed some help.
I do see why you are doing this and I wish you all the very best in your job, which I must say I would also fined very interesting.
I think I can say that there will be  a lot of sad people who use Macs out there with this news.
As far as my keyboard is concerned my space bar is intermittent and can drive you up the wall if you do not keep an eye on the spaces between words.
I followed advice found by searching, it’s a common problem too, but if the bluetooth is connected and battery levels are good then Apple say that’s it, a new keyboard in required. (Wireless 2015 or later here).
At the moment it is working but if it fails again I am off the the store.
Thank you for all you have done and I imagine it is sad for you too. You are right in that there is very little Mac support available here where one can get some answers to problems etc without taking it to places like the iStore.
Good luck.

Thanks, Mark, for everything you have done for fellow Apple users over many years – always interesting and informative.
Your daily news and MagBytes will be very much missed here.
All the best.

Thanks Mark. That has been a long involvement. I was a subscriber to MacGuide and have really appreciated all your advice, reviews and everything over the years on paper and online. Have a restful Xmas and New Year. Kind regards.

So sorry to see this. I have enjoyed this news very much but understand that life can take over sometimes! Cheers.

Thank you and all the best for the future.

And thank you to all for these kind words! M

MagBytes 93 is here … and it’s the last one.


Here is MagBytes 93, the final issue. I am sorry everyone who enjoys this effort of mine, but I no longer have time to do this, and I will also be cutting my Apple news updates dramatically, and no more Friday tips, as I explain in MagBytes 93 on Page 9. I thank you for your support over the last ten years but I simply cannot sustain this any longer.

I will continue to write commentary on Apple when it’s relevant and I have the time on Mac NZ, I will continue to write reviews. I will continue with Futurology and The Apocalypticon (on weekends) as they support my other interests.

Please download MagBytes 93 from this link —>> Issue93November17

Root vulnerability, Pixelmator Pro, Photoshop tease, Similar Pic Finder, iTunes Connect downtime, Docking Station


Pixelmator Pro for Mac is now available

Apple issues macOS High Sierra update to fix password-less root vulnerability — Apple has released a special security update for macOS High Sierra, solving a recently uncovered flaw which would let people gain root access without entering a password.
The patch, Security Update 2017-001, should be available through the Updates tab in the Mac App Store. After installation, the build number of High Sierra will be 17B1002.
Apple notes that if people require a root user account on their Mac, they can create one and assign a password through System Preferences.
Apple also issued a statement to The Loop on the misstep.

Pixelmator Pro debuts with powerful image editing tools, machine learning tech — The developers behind popular image editing app Pixelmator on Tuesday released Pixelmator Pro for Mac, a new title that takes advantage of Apple APIs like Metal 2 and Core Image to deliver GPU-powered tools, machine learning features and more.
Codenamed ‘Whirlwind,’ Pixelmator Pro was first announced in September as a next-generation Mac image editor with hooks into Apple’s latest graphics platforms, as well as advanced in-house technology designed to turbocharge editing workflows.
Pixelmator Pro version 1.0 requires macOS High Sierra and a Metal-compatible graphics card. The app is available now from the Mac App Store for NZ$89.99/US$59.99 (the consumer version of Pixelmator is NZ$21.99). [Since it has Layer support, I can buy this and drop my damn Adobe subscription …]

Adobe demonstrates future Photoshop tool that uses machine learning to select image subjects — Adobe has teased one of the AI-based features coming to Photoshop in the future, with the ‘Select Subject’ function simplifying the selection of an object, person, or animal in a scene, using machine learning to determine what is likely to be the main focus of an image. [See above … Pixelmator Pro already has Machine Learning, and doesn’t need a subscription. Note that I wouldn’t be so down on Adobe if it didn’t put it’s bloody subscription prices up every six months.]

B-Eng debuts Similar Pic Finder 1.0 for macOS — B-Eng has introduced Similar Pic Finder 1.0, a duplicate image discovery utility for macOS. It tracks down duplicates and copies of pictures. Similar Pic Finder requires macOS 10.10 or later. It costs NZ$2.99/US$1.99 and is available at the Mac App Store.

Apple schedules downtime for iTunes Connect — Apple has scheduled downtime for iTunes Connect from December 23rd-27th, so its employees can celebrate the holidays. iTunes Connect is a suite of web-based tools for managing content sold on iTunes, the iBooks Store, and the various app stores.

IOGEAR Compact USB-C Docking Station with PD Pass-Thru a great accessory — If you have a 12-inch MacBook and find it frustrating that it only packs one USB-C port, consider the US$99.95 IOGEAR Compact USB-C Docking Station with PD Pass-Thru [currently that’s about NZ$145, but check if the power supply works in NZ].
It’s also useful for expanding the connectivity options on the latest MacBook Pros as well. Through a single USB-C connection, it lets you connect monitors, a full-sized keyboard and mouse, external hard drives, printers, webcams and more. Easy to set up, the all-in-one dock serves up a total of 10 ports. The docking station is equipped with memory card readers for SD/MicroSD memory cards for quick access to your data. With two USB 3.0 (Type-A) ports, you can connect an array of USB Type-A peripherals.

Apple’s media plans, Safari mutes, sales continue


(Image from The Outline)

Analyst reckons Apple will spend $4.2 billion annually on original video content by 2022 — Apple will spend $4.2 billion per year on original video content by 2022, according to a report by Loup Ventures analyst Gene Munster [in whom I have title confidence, please note]. If he’s right, that will be a major increase on the $1 billion that the tech giant will purportedly spend in 2018, although the amount is still smaller than Netflix and Amazon’s video budgets.

How to mute and unmute audio in Safari tabs in macOS High Sierra — macOS High Sierra’s Safari lets you mute audio in any open tabs. You can do this right from the Smart Search field, so there’s no need to click through all your tabs to locate the one you want to silence. If you’re viewing a tab that’s not playing audio, the Audio button in the Smart Search field is white with a blue outline. If the tab is playing audio, the Audio button is solid blue.

Sales continue all week at OWC — One of the worlds premium brands for Mac equipment, Other World Computing, is continuing its MacSales.com Black Friday and Cyber Monday sales all week. OWC ships to New Zealand.

New Store for Brooklyn — Apple has announced it will open a new retail store in Downtown Brooklyn. The Brooklyn Apple Store will be located in the 300 Ashland building in the Fort Greene neighbourhood. This is Apple’s second retail store in Brooklyn, the first one being in Williamsburg that opened in July 2016. [A sure sign of gentrification.]

Mac games uptick, Scrivener 3, Photos Tagger, Cyber Monday


Mac games rise and you can find bargains — Have you noticed that more and more Mac gaming torrent sites are popping up? Clearly, the demand for Mac games is growing. However, piracy is wrong. Plus, torrent sites are dangerous for you and your Mac, especially when there are better alternatives out there. So forget about Mac games torrents, and check out this advice instead.

Hands On: Scrivener 3.0 further refines the writing, research process on the Mac — AppleInsider gets a published author to take a look at the Scrivener update, with new highlights including a much called-for rewrite of the app’s Compile feature, and an interface modernisation.

Brattoo Propaganda Software debuts Photos Tagger for macOS — Brattoo Propaganda Software has introduced Photos Tagger, a new addition to their applications suite.
Photos Tagger extracts the meta data from the Photos software database, and applies it to your photos as keywords. The app is designed to make it easier to find and organize your pictures.
Photos Tagger requires macOS 10.9 or later and Photos 2.x or higher. It costs US$7.95. A demo is available for download.

Cyber Monday deals — Being New Zealand, these have come through on our Tuesday. TechTool Pro is on special, MacProVideo has deals on subscriptions (US$75 a year) and instructional downloads, and Italian V-Moda headphones have 40% off the Crossfade Wireless version.

Apple’s iMac Pro – what to expect


Everything you need to know about Apple’s iMac Pro in under 6 minutes — AppleInsider goes through every new detail, feature and rumoured specification related to Apple’s upcoming iMac Pro in a video.
Apple has already confirmed a major refresh of the Mac Pro coming in 2018, but little is known about the next-generation desktop, which will likely require users to buy a display separately. If you want one as good as the recent 5K iMacs, it’s going to cost upwards of $1,300 just for the screen alone.
Now comes Apple’s brand new iMac Pro, due to release in December.

[It’s pretty quiet in Apple news today as it has been Thanksgiving weekend in the US.]

Five Tip Friday ~ Reminders, settings and Time Machine on macOS


1/ Reminders on Macs, iPhones, and iPads help you remember anything — Easy to manage, use, and share; always available, and (best of all), there’s nothing new to buy or learn. You can use your Apple devices to remember everything using just some of the apps and services already installed on your Mac and iDevices: the Calendar and Reminders apps, plus Siri. When you need to remember something, ask Siri (on your Mac, iPhone, or Apple Watch) to remind you of that thing at a specific time and date. The item is then recorded on the Inbox list in Reminders . Then, you’ll be reminded (with an onscreen alert and sound) at the appropriate date and time. Brilliant!

2/ Location-based reminders — Siri knows where you live, so say, “Hey Siri. Remind me to charge the eBike when I get home.” Then, when you arrive at your house, you’ll get an alert on your phone or watch saying ‘Upload your column’ (or whatever). [These two tips came from the Mac Observer.]
But does Siri know where you live? Open the Settings app on your iPhone or iPad.
Scroll down and tap Siri. Tap My Info and select your own contact card.

3/ Enable apps at log-in on macOS High Sierra — If there are certain apps you’ll always use the moment you start up your Mac, you can set them up to automatically log-in via System Preferences in macOS High Sierra (and it’s the same for previous versions of macOS, for that matter).
Go to Users, make sure your own user account is highlighted on the left, then click Login Items. Click the + and you can choose an app, file server or pretty much anything else that should open when you log into, or start up, your Mac. Once you’ve added something, you can use the checkboxes to opt to hide it, though it will still be running in the background, thus instantly available.

4/ Add other notes to the Notes app —You can take the notes that you’ve created in other apps, and import them into the Notes app in macOS Sierra. When you import notes, you can add them to your iCloud notes account or your On My Mac account. If you store them in iCloud, you can automatically see all of your notes on any device where you’re signed in with your Apple ID:
Open your Notes app.
Choose to store your notes in iCloud or On My Mac. Click a folder in the account that you want to use.
In the menu bar, click File > Import.
Select the file or folder that you want to import. If the notes that you’re importing are organized in folders, click Options in the lower-left corner to keep them organized.
Click Import. When you see a confirmation message, click Import again.
After your notes import, you’ll see a new folder in the Notes app called Imported Notes. Then you can organise them into any Notes folder that you want.

5/ Remove a Time Machine backup disk — If you back your computer up to multiple drives using Time Machine, you may be familiar with the notification that tells you that you haven’t been backed up in [insert long amount of time here]. You see, if you’ve configured more than one Time Machine disk, your Mac will take turns backing up to each of them when they’re plugged in or connected over your network; you’ll get the warning when one of your disks hasn’t been used for a while, even if the other backups are working fine.
The solution to that is of course to plug in the missing backup and let it run, but what if you no longer own the drive in question? Or if it failed or got run over by a giant chicken or something? To stop Time Machine from warning you about the lost backup drive, you’ll need to remove it from the preferences on your Mac, which is luckily darned easy. To get going with this and stop those pop-ups, start by clicking Time Machine’s circle-clock icon in your menu bar and picking “Open Time Machine Preferences.”
If you don’t see the circle-clock near the top-right of your screen, you can instead use the Apple Menu to open System Preferences then click Time Machine. Whichever way you get there, though, the Time Machine preference pane has the option to remove a disk under the “Select Disk” button.
Within that section, you’ll find your list of backup disks at the top. Click the one you want to get rid of, and then choose Remove Disk.