Category Archives: Tips

Five Tip Friday ~ for iOS and Apple Watch


1/ Change the Playlist pictures in iOS Music — By default, playlists within the Music app use the albums’ artwork as their identifying image. But you can take a picture to use or grab one from your Photos library: here’s how on iPhone/iPad.
Open the Music app, and then click on the Library tab to visit the Playlists section.
Touch the one you’d like to change the picture on, and tap the Edit button at top right on the subsequent screen.
In this editing mode, you’ll see a small photo icon appear on the playlist’s image at top left – tap that.
You’ll be given an option to either take a photo or choose one from your library.Choose, or take, and tap Done to finish the job.
The change will sync to your other devices if you’re using iCloud Music Library. Cool, right?

2/ Use your Apple Watch to auto unlock your Mac — Apple added a feature in macOS Sierra and watchOS 3 called Auto Unlock. This lets you automatically unlock your Mac by waking it up. It’s handy to use and easy to set up if you have an Apple Watch running watchOS 3 and a mid-2013 or newer Mac running macOS Sierra 10.2 or newer.
First you’ll need to set up two-factor authentication for your Apple ID, as this doesn’t work with two-step verification. Apple has a support page to switch from verification to authentication (Mac Observer has an article on setting up 2FA here).
Once that’s set up, turn on Bluetooth and Wi-Fi on your Mac. You’ll also need to be signed into your Watch and Mac with the same Apple ID and your Mac can’t be using Internet Sharing. Check to make sure in System Preferences > Sharing. Next, go to System Preferences > Security & Privacy.
Both your Mac and Apple Watch need to be set up with a passcode. On your Watch, go to Settings > Passcode > Turn Passcode On. On your Mac, go to System Preferences > Users & Groups > Change Password.
Now on your Mc, click on the Apple icon () in the upper left corner of your screen.
Click System Preferences > Security & Privacy > General.
Check the box next to Allow your Apple Watch to unlock your Mac.
It will take a couple of seconds to activate. Now, the next time you need to wake up your Mac, Apple Watch auto unlock will automatically unlock it. It’s just magic.

3/ Ditch the Honeycomb App Grid in watchOS 4 — Along with the Developer Beta 1 of iOS 11, Apple also recently released the first preview version of watchOS 4. This developer beta (so still not generally available to everyone) brings some under-the-hood enhancements, new watch faces and more intelligence and fitness features. It also includes something that wasn’t announced – you can now ditch the awkward honeycomb app grid and instead get a list of your installed apps:
Press the Digital Crown to get to your Apple Watch Home screen. Then, Force Touch the screen and a brand new configuration panel shows up.
Choose between grid view or list view.
Once you’ve made the switch, you can scroll normally through your apps in a list, sorted alphabetically. You can also rotate the Digital Crown to move through your apps, which are sorted alphabetically.
There isn’t any way to rearrange your apps in List View, at least for now. Bear in mind, though, this is still only Developer Beta 1 of watchOS 4 so more changes may be yet to come in future beta versions of the wearable operating system. The developer beta is available now, and the full release is expected in northern autumn 2017.
(It’s also worth noting that watchOS 4 will leave some iPhone owners out in the cold. It requires a paired iPhone 5S or later with iOS 11 to download and install. This is because Apple has removed 32-bit device support in iOS 11. Devices like the iPhone 4S, iPhone 5, and iPhone 5C are only 32-bit devices, so they aren’t supported by the latest version of the operating system.)

4/ iMazing — You know how getting files off an iPhone or iPad onto a Mac can be a mission, mostly because AirDrop only works sometimes? An app for macOS called iMazing changes all that. It’s not cheap though: a single license for iMazing costs US$39.99, a universal license is US$49.99, or you can get five licenses US$69.99 (for both Windows and Mac). all you need to do to unleash this power is plug your iPhone/iPad into your Mac with the charge cable (since it’s USB at the end that goes into the power charger). For example, via iTunes, it’s easy to transfer music from Mac to iPhone or iPad. What if you want to export tracks off your iOS device? That’s not possible in iTunes, but it’s a snap with iMazing: select the media files you want, whether they’re songs, movies, TV shows, podcasts, or audiobooks, then click Export to Folder, and iMazing will happily transfer them to your hard drive. It’s even smart about it, recognising the tracks you already have in iTunes and leaving them alone.

5/ Archive and even print Messages — If you want to save your text messages and iMessage conversations to your desktop, or even print them, with iMazing you can. It doesn’t matter if you want a PDF, text document, comma-separated values (CSV, like a spreadsheet) file, or a full printout of your messages, this app can handle it. You can also export attachments separately, for those times when you want to get a bunch of images out of your text message history.

There’s lots more about this app at Mac Observer.

Five Tip Friday ~ Finding things on Macs, secure Keychain notes, disabling Safari autoplay


1/ Use Boolean Oprators in Spotlight — All you need to do is insert the words AND, OR, or NOT (or a minus sign) into searches, depending on what you’re trying to find. For example, if you want to see files on your system with either ‘project’ or ‘writing’ in the title, invoke Spotlight by clicking on the magnifying glass in the upper-right corner of my screen or by using its keyboard shortcut (Command-Spacebar), and type: title:project OR title:writing
Note there’s no space after the colon.
Alternatively, you can find items from two separate dates: date:6/6/66 OR date:17/6/17
Use NOT (or the minus sign -) to exclude file types, for example, from your results:
date:6/6/66 NOT kind:pdf
If you have any more questions or would just like to see more ways to use this, check out the examples Apple posted on this support page.

2/ Find tagged items in macOS — If you’ve set up your Safari-like tabs to work in folders in macOS Sierra, it’s easy to find the items you’ve tagged. Click the Finder icon in the Dock to open a Finder window and do any of the following:
Search for a tag: Enter the tag color or name in the search field, then select the tag from the suggestions.
Ask Siri. Say something like: Find files with a red tag.
Select a tag in the sidebar: To see everything with a certain tag, click the tagin the Finder sidebar.
To change the items you see in the sidebar, choose Finder > Preferences, click Tags, then select the tags you want to see.
Arrange items by a tag: Click the Item Arrangement button , then choose Tags.
Sort items by a tag: In any view, choose View > Show View Options, then select the Tags checkbox. In List view and Cover Flow, move the pointer over the Tags column, then click it. Click the column name again to reverse the sort order.

3/ Go directly to a specific folder in macOS Sierra — You can jump directly to a specific folder in macOS Sierra: In the Finder, click the Go menu in the menu bar, then choose one of the following:
Enclosing Folder: Choose this option to open the parent folder for the current window. For example, if you’re in your Downloads folder, this option opens your All My Files, Documents, or other listed folders: Choose a folder from the list.
Recent Folders: Choose a folder from the submenu. (The submenu shows up to 10 recently opened folders.)
Go to Folder: Type the folder’s pathname (for example, /Library/Fonts/ or ~/Pictures/), then click Go.
A slash at the beginning of a pathname indicates that the starting point is the top level of your computer’s folder structure. A slash at the end indicates that this is a path to a folder, rather than a file.
A tilde (~) indicates your home folder. Most of your personal folders, such as Documents, Music, and Pictures, are in your home folder.
If you’re having trouble finding a folder, make sure you’re spelling its name correctly and typing the full path, including slashes.
You can also ask Siri to, for instance, ‘Open the home folder.’
(To reveal the hidden macOS Library folder, press and hold the Option key on your keyboard, then choose Library as it will be revealed in the Go list.)

4/  Using Keychain’s Secure Notes feature — If you need to store private information on your Mac like an Inland Revenue number, there is a feature of a built-in program called Keychain Access that’ll let you store notes in a very secure way. If you’d like to take a look, open the app first—you can get to it within the Applications > Utilities folder by using Finder’s Go menu.
Once the app is open, click on “Secure Notes” from the sidebar and then click on the keychain where you’d like to store yours.
Use either the login or iCloud keychain for this – the only difference is that the iCloud one will sync these notes to any other Macs that are set up with your iCloud Keychain. (The notes won’t sync to your iOS devices, though.)
Once you’ve selected both options, click the plus button at the bottom-left corner of the window. Then you can give your new note a name and type the stuff you want to keep private under the Note field.
Once finished typing, click Add and your note will appear in the list. If you want to look at it at any point afterward, just go back to Keychain Access, click Secure Notes in the sidebar, and choose the keychain you added it to.
Double-click on the note to view it, and when you do, you won’t see the secret info you typed yet—yay! It’s still all hidden and private and stuff.
You’ll need to click the “Show Note” box I’ve called out above, and then your Mac will make you type in your login password to prove that you have the right to view its contents.
Melissa Holt likes this method better than using iCloud’s password-protected notes because it’s sort of “security by obscurity” – no one will likely think to look in Keychain Access for your notes. Which is good if you’re the type who doesn’t want anyone to even know that you have secrets to keep! Plus, you only have to remember one password – your Mac’s login one – which makes losing access less likely, and it’s darned secure as long as no one knows that password. For those same reasons, I like using Keychain Access better than password-protected documents, too. But this is certainly better than what a lot of people do, which is using Contacts’ Notes field to store very secret data. [From Mac Observer.]

5/ Disable autoplay in Safari — If you hate it when certain sites auto-play videos when you arrive at their site [it’s why I stopped using the otherwise excellent Macworld site], you can disable video autoplay using Terminal: quit Safari completely. That means clicking Safari from the top left of the menu bar, and then Quit. Once that’s done, launch Terminal from Applications -> Utilities. In Terminal, type the following commands:

defaults write com.apple.Safari WebKitMediaPlaybackAllowsInline -bool false
defaults write com.apple.Safari com.apple.Safari.ContentPageGroupIdentifier.WebKit2AllowsInlineMediaPlayback -bool false

— If you’re running the WebKit Technology Preview, you’ll also need to run these commands in Terminal:

defaults write com.apple.SafariTechnologyPreview WebKitMediaPlaybackAllowsInline -bool false
defaults write com.apple.SafariTechnologyPreview com.apple.Safari.ContentPageGroupIdentifier.WebKit2AllowsInlineMediaPlayback -bool false

That’s it. Start up Safari once again, and enjoy a life free of video autoplay.

Five Tip Friday ~ Safari, privacy, wiFi and the Help Viewer


1/ Zoom in Safari using a Magic Trackpad — In the Trackpad or Mouse system preference pane, click the Scroll & Zoom tab, and then you can opt to check or uncheck Smart Zoom. Now, when you double-tap with two fingers, Safari and other apps will zoom the item tapped upon to fill the screen. Two-finger double-tap again, and it zooms back out to the normal view. This zoom remains preserved when you go back a page and back forward.
Apple also offers a systemwide zoom in the Accessibility preference pane: open the pane, select Zoom, and you can opt to enable or disable the Use Scroll Gesture with Modifier Keys to Zoom. (The Control key is the default modifier.)

2/ Prevent tracking in Safari —  macOS High Sierra will have a feature called Intelligent Tracking Prevention, and Sierra already has some anti-tracking abilities. Safari uses machine learning to prevent tracking in the browser, specially cross-site tracking. Open Safari and go to Preferences (press ⌘+,, or Safari > Preferences in the menu).
Click on the Privacy tab in the window that pops up.
You’ll see a new Website Tracking section (shown above) with two items: ‘Prevent cross-site tracking’ and ‘Ask websites not to track me’. The latter is also found in macOS Sierra and is equivalent to a Do Not Track setting. However, most websites won’t voluntarily honour this setting, and aren’t even legally obligated to do so.
(Apple also streamlined cookie blocking in Safari 11. Instead of having the usual settings like Always block, Allow from current website only, Allow from websites I visit, Always allow, in macOS High Sierra you will also just get the option to block all cookies, since Intelligent Tracking Prevention does the rest.)

3/ Use Modifier Keys with Safari history — You can click-and-hold on Safari’s back button to see a list of where you’ve been (above). This lets you quickly jump back to somewhere without hitting that back button several times.
There are a couple of things you can do with this button to make it even cooler: if you’re looking for URLs instead, hold down the Option key on your keyboard before you click and click-and-hold the back button to do just that.
If you want to keep your existing page as a tab or a window before you open something from your history, that’s easy too. Obviously, when you click the back button without holding it, Safari will go back to the last page you visited. Hold down the Shift key on your keyboard and click that button, and the browser will instead open your last page in a new window. If you hold down Command, your last page will open in a new tab.
This Shift-or-Command trick also works if you have the history view open (History menu>Show All History). If you click-and-hold on your back button to bring up that little popover, holding down Shift and choosing any of the pages you visited opens it in a new window; Command opens it in a new tab. This behavior is actually all through Safari: shift-click a bookmark or a history item, and it’ll open in a new window; Command-click a link, and it’ll open in a new tab.
(If your version of Safari isn’t behaving in the way described here, be sure to check out your settings at Safari > Preferences under the Tabs section.)

4/ Changing your WiFi Password on an AirPort device — Sometimes you’ve may want to change your Wi-Fi password – perhaps you gave it to someone you now wish you hadn’t, or maybe your roommate moved out, but you’ve seen them outside your house leeching off your connection. (I’m sure that’s happened to someone.) If you have an Apple router (like a Time Capsule, AirPort Extreme, AirPort Express), it’s really simple to change this.
Launch AirPort Utility (it’s in the Applications > Utilities folder, which you can easily get to using Finder’s Go menu.)
When AirPort Utility opens, click on your AirPort device and choose Edit.
You may have to enter the password for your device to do this; this is usually the same as your Wi-Fi password, but if it’s not, then…uh…just keep on guessing until you figure it out. Fingers crossed. (You might consider going and checking your keychain to see if it’s stored there if you’re having trouble.)
Once you click Edit, choose the Wireless tab at the top. There you’ll find your wireless password.
So just type what you’d like your new one to be into both the first password box and the Verify Password box. Be sure that the ‘Remember this password in my keychain’ choice is on, too, but don’t mess with any other settings there unless you know what you’re doing.
After your options are set, click Update. AirPort Utility will then of course warn you of what you’re about to do, and restart the device – full service will recommence after reboot.
Keep two things in in mind: first, changing your Wi-Fi password doesn’t change your base station device’s password; if you’d like to make that the same, head over to the Base Station tab within AirPort Utility.
Secondly, everything you own that connects to your Wi-Fi – iPhones, iPads, computers, Apple TVs, and printers, for example – will need to be reconnected to your network afterward, so don’t undertake this task lightly as you’ll be typing the new password into all those devices. It’s no fun to spend the evening changing passwords on printers if you haven’t planned for it.

5/ Use Terminal to send the macOS Help Viewer to the back — You can access your Mac’s built-in support info by choosing Help from the menu at the top of any program. There is one irritation, though: the Help Viewer window always sits on top of everything else, even if you switch programs. It will stay in front until you close it (although you can Minimise it into the Dock by clicking the orange button at top left). Staying on top of everything can be frustrating  when you’re attempting to try out a solution that the help pages suggest.
Luckily, you can change this behavior through Terminal (it’s in your Utilities folder inside the Applications folder). To do so, copy the following command…

defaults write com.apple.helpviewer DevMode -bool YES

…and paste it into the Terminal program after the flashing prompt. When the command is pasted in, press Return, and then the Help Viewer window will behave just like most of the other windows on your Mac: if you click on another window or program, it’ll move to the background.
If you decide you want to put things back the way they were, just go back to Terminal, replace the “YES” with “NO” in the command, and press Return:

defaults write com.apple.helpviewer DevMode -bool NO

Five Tip Friday ~ Checking the weather Reminders, Night Shift Calendar & extra extras


1/ Check the Weather quickly using Spotlight — If you’re curious what the weather is like, you can launch the stock or a 3rd party weather app, sure, or just pull down on a Home Screen page to get Spotlight (device and ’net search) to appear. Type in “weather (and location)” to get the weather report for that spot. You’ll get the details you’re looking for. The same applies to any day within the normal seven-day forecast period. This Spotlight trick works on iPad, too. (It even works on macOS in Spotlight.)

2/ Delete all Reminders in a list — Sometimes, you want to quickly delete all reminders in a list. People use the Reminders app as a catch-all for everything we want to remember, whether it’s work-related or a group of tasks we need to cary out.
Within iOS, there’s a way to delete not only the list, but also all the reminders within that list. This works for things you’ve marked as completed, along with tasks that you haven’t tapped to show them as done. Launch the Reminders app and navigate to the list you want to delete.
Now, tap the Edit button in the top right corner of the app.
Scroll to the bottom (if you can’t see it it) and find the item that says Delete List.
Tap that option and confirm you want to delete all the reminders. (This is a viable on Mac too: secondary click (right- or Control-click) the name of the list and choose Delete. If you are working in iCloud.com, you can go to a Reminders list, click on Options, and then choose Delete. When you delete a Reminders list from one device, that action will take place on every device logged into the same iCloud account.

3/ Night Shift Mode into Staying on All the Time — You can have Night Shift on iOS on all the time if you prefer the softer lighting (it’s more yellowish) of Night Shift mode all the time. Night Shift is most useful after sunset, you may want to have it enabled all the time. This display-based setting makes your screen “warmer,” usually at night, to cut down on blue light exposure which is believed to keep people awake. To get to this setting: Settings> Display & Brightness> Night Shift. The default is to have the mode activate at sunset, and then deactivate at sunrise but you can also set custom start and stop times for the mode.
To keep Night Shift on during the day, you need to set custom hours for the feature. Unfortunately, you can’t set the start and stop times the same so you have to decide on a one-minute time of the day (or night) when it’s okay for the mode to briefly deactivate: for example, Night Shift could temporarily stop at 1:59am. Then, the mode turns back on at 2am.

4/ Set your default Calendar across devices — People can find their Mac set to add events by default to one calendar while their iPhone is adding them automatically to a different one. This can make it seem that iPhone events are colour-coded differently to Mac events, which is confusing.
All your Apple devices that can sync with your iCloud account have a “default calendar” setting that’ll be applied when you don’t specifically change which one you’d like to add an event to. On the iPhone and iPad, this option is listed under Settings > Calendar. On the Mac, this setting is within Calendar > Preferences under the “General” tab.

5/ Dealing with other calendar services — When a device is set to sync to a calendar (say, a Google one) and that particular calendar isn’t even configured on another of that person’s devices, it will make it seem like everything from one device is disappearing. You can check which accounts you’ve got set to sync calendars on the Mac under System Preferences > Internet Accounts.
Any of your accounts that have “Calendars” listed in grey underneath their names are syncing that service with your Mac. Verify that you’ve got the same list turned on for your iPhone or iPad at Settings > Calendar > Accounts.

Extra – The Health app: as Apple Insider puts it in a detailed explanation, the launchpad for all things is the Health Data tab, which lists all of the categories the app can handle. While Activity, Mindfulness, Nutrition and Sleep are front-and-center, others include Body Measurements,  Health Records, Reproductive Health, Results and Vitals. These all break down into numerous subcategories, where the real meat of the app is found. Under “Activity,” for instance, are items like steps, workout duration, and active energy consumption. Tapping on one displays a graph with adjustable views, as well as an explanation, suggested apps, and a set of configuration options.

Extra extra — the logic of iPhone/iPad Force Quitting: The Mac Observer has a detailed description of why and when you may need to do this, and when you should’t worry.

Five Tip Friday ~ Live Photos in macOS, email threads, finding 32-bit apps, Calendar invites, blank disk images


1/ View ‘Live Photos’ in macOS Sierra’s Photos app — The Live Photos feature of recent iPhones is a lot of fun. It captures 1.5 seconds of movement surrounding a 12-megapixel still image (think the “moving newspaper” photos in the Harry Potter films). A Live Photo is signified by a small concentric circle and “Live” text in the corner of the picture. If you want to play the video portion of a Live Photo in macOS Sierra, here’s how:
Open the Photos app.
Open any album where a Live Photo is contained
Open any Live Photo by double-clicking on it.
Hover the mouse cursor over the Live Photo to play the video portion of the picture in Photos on Mac.

2/ Turning Off Highlighting on Related Messages in macOS Mail — You can turn this view off really easily by picking a mailbox from the sidebar and deselecting Organize by Conversation from the View menu.
That choice is set on a per-mailbox basis, though, so you’ll need to go through and do it for all of your mailboxes if you never want to see conversations again.
There is a related feature that drives me nuts, too. Depending on your settings, Mail may be highlighting all related messages with a color when you click on just one of them, even if conversation view is off. Click on an email in grey, and then all of the other messages from that thread light up in blue. Maybe that’s handy for you, but if you find it visually confusing, you can disable this. Choose Mail > Preferences from the menus at the top, and then when the Preferences window appears, click on the Viewing tab. The option Highlight messages with color when not grouped is what you turn off if you aren’t a fan of this feature. If you prefer, you could also click on that little coloured box next to Highlight messages with color when not grouped to pick a different colour to use for the highlight. Then you make it really, really obvious why those messages are coloured.

3/ How to See Which Mac Apps are 32-Bit — Apple plans to stop support for 32-bit apps across iOS and macOS. While iOS 11 will remove them this fall, macOS will continue to support them until 2019. Nevertheless, it doesn’t hurt to start early and find the 32-bit Mac apps. If you do find that software you rely on is 32-bit, contact the developer and see if they plan to update to 64-bit. Most developers will, but older software may not get this support, so you might have to start finding alternatives.
On your Mac’s desktop, click on the Apple logo () at the upper left of the screen.
Click About This Mac.
In the window that pops up, click System Report.
Next, in the System Information app that this brings up, find Applications under Software in the left menu.
Click on Applications, and your Mac will take a few seconds to compile the list.
Once it’s finished, scroll sideways to right until you see the header 64-bit (Intel).
Apps will have a Yes/No designation to determine whether they are 32-bit Mac apps or not. “Yes” means they’re 64-bit and “No” means they’re 32-bit.
Many of the items in the list will be from Apple; you don’t need to worry about those. Instead, look for the ones that say Identified Developer.

4/ Contacting Calendar invitees — There’s an easy way to send an email or a message to all of the participants to an event on a Calendar if you need to pass along new information without putting it on the invite. Just right- or Control-click on the event in question. The contextual menu  that appears contains all sorts of helpful options, like a way to switch up the calendar the event is on, for example. But the two choices near the bottom are the ones that concern us: Email All Participants and Message All Participants. If you pick Email, your Mac will start composing one to all of the listed invitees with the details of the event already included in the body of the email. You can then add in any information you need to!
The steps to do this on iOS are simple, too. Tap on the event, and then scroll down to find the Invitees section.
Tap that, and you’ll see a small envelope icon that you can use to email the participants. This is much faster than typing everyone’s email in, and easier than having to remember who all is coming in the first place. (From the Mac Observer.)

 

5/ How to create a blank disk image for storage using macOS Sierra’s Disk Utility — Using the Disk Utility in macOS Sierra, you can create a blank disk image for storage. A disk image (.dmg file) is a file that looks and acts like a mountable device or volume like  hard drive or thumb/USB drive, but it’s not – it’s virtual. But you can fill an empty disk image with data, then use it to create disks, CDs, or DVDs [from Apple World Today], or even unmount it, and mount it when you need it, so it’s generally hidden.
To create an empty disk image:
Choose File > New Image > Blank Image.
Enter a file name for the disk image, add tags if necessary, then choose where to save it. This is the name that appears in the Finder, where you save the disk image file before opening it.
In the Name field, enter the name for the disk image.
This is the name that appears on your desktop and in the Finder sidebar, after you open the disk image.
In the Size field, enter a size for the disk image.
Click the Format pop-up menu, then choose the format for the disk:
If the disk will be used with Mac computers, choose Mac OS Extended (Journaled) or Mac OS Extended (Case-sensitive, Journaled). If the disk will be used with Windows or Mac computers and is 32 GB or less, choose MS-DOS (FAT). If the disk will be used with Windows or Mac computers and is over 32 GB, choose ExFAT.
To encrypt the disk image, click the Encryption pop-up menu, then choose an encryption option.Click the Partitions pop-up menu, then choose a partition layout. Click the Image Format pop-up menu, then choose an option:
Sparse bundle: Same as a sparse image, but the directory data for the image is stored differently. Uses the .sparsebundle file extension.
Sparse: Creates an expandable file that shrinks and grows as needed. No additional space is used. Uses the .sparseimage file extension.
Read/write: Allows you to add files to the disk image after it’s created. Uses the .dmg file extension.
DVD/CD master: Changes the size of the image to 177 MB (CD 8 cm). Uses the .cdr file extension.
Click Save, then click Done.
Disk Utility creates the disk image file where you saved it in the Finder and mounts its disk icon on your desktop and in the Finder sidebar.

Five Tip Friday ~ iOS tips


1/ Check your iPhone battery percentage from macOS Sierra — If you are an iOS user who also has a Mac, making sure your Mac and iPhone are both using the same iCloud account and you have Bluetooth enabled, you can hold down the Option key on your Mac’s keyboard and click the Wi-Fi icon in the Mac menu bar. After a second or so, your iPhone will show up in the Personal Hotspot section even if you’re not using it to set up a personal hotspot.
If you’re not using it as a personal hotspot, that option will be in light grey; if you are using the iPhone for that purpose, Personal Hotspot will be in bold letters. either way, the battery icon and signal strength is displayed (left).
However, if you mouse over your iPhone’s line, a small menu will appear that shows the exact percentage of battery you have left (below).

2/ Individual Read Receipts in Messages — You can turn on read receipts in Messages for just one contact. If you tap the information button (an “i” with a circle around it at top-right of your screen) you’ll see the option to enable read receipts just for that person.

3/ Take screen shots on iPhone and iPad — The ability to quickly snap a photo of whatever’s on your iPhone’s (or iPad’s) screen. It’s handy for everything from documenting buggy iOS apps to quickly sharing a text message thread with a friend.
Just press the Sleep/Wake (on the top right of your iPhone/iPad) and the Home button (the dished button at bottom centre of your screen) at the same time. The screen will flash and you’ll hear a telltale camera snap, then find your screenshot sitting in the iOS Photos app’s Screenshots album or in your Camera Roll. From there, you can share it by tapping the Share Sheet button (the square button with the upward arrow).

4/ Pinch-and-zoom to enlarge stickers — You can actually adjust how large or small stickers are before you send them: when you’re peeling a sticker off to put it somewhere in your conversation, add a second finger and pinch-to-zoom. This way you can make it bigger or smaller before you drop it into the chat.

5/ Unfreeze a frozen iPhone — It’s winter here but hey, this can happen in summer too. Sometimes your iPhone may come to a grinding halt, perhaps because of an errant app, or maybe iOS itself has locked itself up for some reason. Generally speaking, quitting a frozen app (by double-clicking the Home button, then swiping up on the app’s multitasking card that appears) is enough to fix the problem. You could also try a standard restart (press and hold the Sleep/Wake button until the “slide to power off” slider appears).
But if an app remains stubbornly stuck—or, worse still, if iOS becomes completely locked up—there’s another way to get things moving again: by force restarting your iPhone (a.k.a., a “hard” reset).
On pre-iPhone 7 models: Press the Sleep/Wake and Home buttons—but instead of letting them go immediately as you would when taking a screenshot, keep holding them until the screen goes blank. In a moment or so, you should see the Apple logo, a sure sign that your iPhone (or iPad) is rebooting itself.
On iPhone 7 or iPhone 7 Plus: Press and hold the Sleep/Wake and volume-down buttons until you see the Apple logo.

Five Tip Friday ~ hidden gems in macOS can be genuinely useful


Hello, Mac acolytes, another five fine tips for your Friday.

1/ Two ways to turn on Do Not Disturb — If you’re in the Notification Center (this is under the little 3-lines-3 dots icon at top right of your Mac screen) the already, simply pull down the panel until you see Do Not Disturb. If your Mac supports it, you can also enable Night Shift mode from there.
Alternatively, just Option-click (hold down the Option key on your keyboard and click) the Notification Center icon in the status bar, and Do Not Disturb will turn on.

2/ Rule Launchpad — Do you use Launchpad, the iPad-like app launching interface? I don’t. But if you do, why not set it up how you want to? You can delete apps from your Applications folder using Launchpad, just like you can from the Home Screen on iOS. Simply bring up the Launchpad app, and press the Option key until the apps start wiggling. You’ll see X symbols in the apps you can delete, so go ahead and clean up your Applications folder. (Technically, you should be using an app cleaner, which deletes files elsewhere that are connected to apps in the Applications folder as well, but for little apps, this can be fine.)
Also note this is most unlike the Dock, since deleting an app from the Dock leaves that app safe in Applications – it just removes the quick link  button to the app that the Dock generates for you.

3/ Filter Unread Messages in macOS Mail — The Mail app now allows you to filter your unread messages. At the top of the messages pane, you’ll see a circle with an upside-down triangle. Just click on that little button, and Mail will filter your email, showing you only unread messages.

4/ Quick Look at Documents and Images — The Finder has a Quick Look feature. After you’ve single-clicked on a document, image, or other types of files, press the space bar on your keyboard. A quick preview of that file will show up, along with the option to open it in the correct app. Remember, a single-click selects, a double-click launches – the confusion here is buttons, like items in the Dock,which launch with a single click.
(There’s one more important attribute of buttons in the Dock, by the way – click-and-hold, which displays new and different functions in a pop-out menu.)

5/ Quickly get lyrics to songs in Apple Music — If you’re an Apple Music subscriber and use iTunes on your Mac, you’ll be pleased to know you can access song lyrics without ever leaving the app. If you click the “Up Next” button to the right of the status window, you’ll see a tab for lyrics. Click it …

Five Tip Friday ~ Safari in macOS


1/ How to clear your Safari browsing history in macOS Sierra — You can remove all records that macOS Sierra’s Safari keeps of where you’ve browsed during a period of time you want. If your Mac and your other devices have Safari turned on to sync in iCloud preferences, your browsing history is removed from all of those devices.
Clearing your browsing history in Safari doesn’t clear any browsing histories kept independently by websites you visited. Choose History > Clear History, click the pop-up menu, then choose how far back you want your browsing history cleared.
When you clear your history, Safari removes all the data it saves as a result of your browsing, including the history of webpages you visited, the back and forward list for open webpages, Top Sites that aren’t marked as permanent, your frequently visited site list, recent searches, and more. You will need to log into services like Facebook again … so make sure you really want to remove all this data before you clear your Safari history.

2/ Bookmark folders — If you’re using Safari’s Favorites Bar (which can be revealed by choosing View > Show Favorites Bar from the program’s menus at the top), there are a few neat things you can do with folders full of bookmarks (Bookmarks menu, Add Bookmarks Folder). You can tell what bookmarks in the Favourites Bar are folders because of those tiny downward-caret-arrow things to the right of each one (above). Apple calls these Disclosure Triangles because clicking them always reveals things. If you click on one, you’ll note the Open in New Tabs option.
Choose that, and obviously the bookmarks within that folder will open in their own tabs, which is a fast way to launch a whole bunch of sites at once. If, however, you hold down the Option key on your keyboard before you click there, Open in New Tabs switches to Replace Tabs. This means any tabs you had in your existing Safari window will vanish and be replaced by the ones in the folder you chose. Neat!

3/ For an even faster way to do either of those things — Use the Command key or the Option key. If you hold down Command and click on any toolbar bookmarks folder, it’ll open the sites within in new tabs; hold down Option and click one, and Safari will replace your existing tabs like we just discussed.

4/ Set your folders to automatically replace existing ones with just a click — To configure that, right- or Control-click on the folder and pick Automatically Replace Tabs from the contextual menu.
That will add a little square next to the folder in your toolbar, which will mean a single click will replace all of your existing tabs with the ones in that folder. (Be careful about doing that accidentally. If that happens, there are ways to recover your lost tabs.)

5/ Some of this functionality is available from the bookmarks sidebar if you prefer that view — For example, you can right- or Control-click on folders from there to pick Open in New Tabs. Holding down the Option key will switch that to Replace Tabs, as it does in the toolbar. [These last four tips came from The Mac Observer, which has more pictures.] 

Five Tip Friday ~ Tips for macOS Sierra


1/ Change the default search scope in the macOS Sierra Finder — The macOS Sierra Finder is the home base for your Mac. You use it to organize and access almost everything on your Mac, including documents, images, movies, and any other files you have. When you do a search, the Finder will search through your entire Mac to find what you’re looking for. However, you can change the default search scope:
In the Finder (i.e., then the word to the right of the Apple icon at top left is ‘Finder’ – this is where you tell what the ‘foremost’ app or program is on a Mac), click on this Finder menu and select Preferences from the drop-down menu.
Click the Advanced tab.
Navigate to the bottom of the Preferences window and locate the drop-down menu labeled ‘When performing a search’ and click on it.
You’ll have three options from which to chooses: Search This Mac, Search the Current Folder and Use the Previous Search Scope. Pick the one you want.

2/ Hidden Display options — Displays on Mac just get better and better, but Apple has simplified the interface that drives them in macOS 10.12 Sierra and the Detect Displays button now appears to be missing. The option in System Preferences>Displays is still there, and there are others, revealed a simple keystroke: it appears when you hold down the Option key on your keyboard, the Detect Displays button replaces the Gather Windows button at lower right – this is handy if your Mac has somehow ‘lost’ one of your attached monitors or projectors.
Another feature you can take advantage of lies in setting the resolution for your display. With the Scaled option selected, you’ll see quite a few native resolutions for your monitor and graphics chip. However, if you press the Option key as you click the Scaled radio button, you’ll see even more resolutions for you to pick from if you have a non-Apple secondary monitor plugged in (it does not work for built in displays, at least not in my case). But be careful with the resolution choices, as some of them might not be native to your display or Mac. That means they might not work out for you, even though they’re listed.

3/ Connect a USB printer in macOS Sierra — The default printer is the one selected when the Print dialog opens. If ‘No printer selected’ shows up instead in the Print dialogue, you’ll need to add a new printer.
For most USB-connected printers, all you have to do is update your software then connect the printer to your Mac. macOS can automatically detect the printer and download any necessary software. But for other printers, you may have to complete a few steps to add the printer. Here’s how.
Update your software: choose Apple menu > App Store, click Updates, then install any software updates listed. Even if no updates appear, this ensures that macOS has the latest information about printer software it can download from Apple. If you don’t do this, you may see a message that software isn’t available when you connect your printer.
Prepare your printer: use the instructions that came with your printer to unpack the printer, install ink or toner, and add paper. Turn on the printer and make sure it’s not displaying any errors.
Connect your printer: connect the USB cable to your Mac. If you see a message prompting you to download new software, make sure to download and install it.
Important: If your Mac has a single USB-C port, use a multiport adapter. Connect the printer, then connect a USB-C cable to a power supply to prolong the battery life of your Mac.
Go to System Preferences, and choose Printers & Scanners.
If a printer appears in the list, you can click on it. If none appears, click the “+” icon To remove a printer, click the “-“ icon. [From Apple World Today.]

4/ Always start new iWork documents with a specific template — Pages, Numbers and Keynote just got free updates with lots of new features, so why not have them work more usefully for you on first launch? If you prefer to always start with a blank document, or if you regularly use one particular template, you can configure Pages to start out with that selection instead of the Template Chooser. This also works with Numbers and Keynote, by the way. Here’s how to configure the app to start new documents the way you want.
By default, this is what you see when you opt to create a new document in Pages
This configuration setting is located within the Preferences menu in Pages for macOS. Just click Pages in the upper left corner of the menu bar, then choose Preferences from the drop-down menu.
You’ll probably notice that the top option from the General pane, Show Template Chooser, is selected beside For New Documents. Below that, you’ll see an option labeled Use template. Click the radio button to select that choice. When you select Use template, it will probably automatically choose the Blank document. If that’s what you want, exit the Preferences pane. If you want to use a different template, click on Change Template.
Now, a new window will open to allow you to choose your default template. Scroll through, make your selection, and then click Choose. Now, every time you open a new document in Pages (or Numbers or Keynote, as you can change those preferences, too) it will begin with the template you selected. If you regularly create documents from a particular template, or always generate your files from scratch, setting this option will save you a mouse click or two.

5/ Prevent Photos and iTunes from opening automatically on Macs when you plug in an iPhone or iPad — When you plug an iDevice into your Mac, you might have noticed that iTunes and Photos open. If you’re looking to sync music over to your device or import pictures, that’s great; however, if all you want to do is charge the device while you’re at your computer, then having to quit a couple of pesky programs is less awesome.
Both applications have a way to disable this behaviour, though. Start by plugging in the device, and then if necessary, click on the small icon in the toolbar [shown at left] to access its settings.
When that next screen appears, look under the “Summary” tab to find “Automatically sync when this [device] is connected” (which may instead say “Open iTunes when this [device] is connected”).
Uncheck that box and click ‘Apply’ in the bottom-right corner.
Photos’ option is just as easy to find. Plug in your iPhone or iPad as before, and then depending on your configuration, you may have to either click on the “Import” tab at the top, or choose the device itself from your sidebar. Then you should see a little checkbox near the top-left of the window labeled Open Photos for this device.
Uncheck that, and you’re all done – when you plug in that iPhone or iPad now, neither program will open.

Five Tip Friday ~ iOS tips for working smarter, Hot Spot and staying more secure


(Image from The Mac Observer)

1/ Split View on iPhone 6 Plus, 6s Plus and 7 Plus — Split View on the iPhone 7 Plus can make you more productive. It’s not the same as Split View for iPad – you can’t multitask with it but you can use Split View mode on iPhone 7 Plus be more productive in certain apps.
This mode, activated in iOS 10 by turning your iPhone to landscape orientation, works in apps like Mail, Calendar, Reminders, Safari and more. It provides you with a two-column view, making more efficient use of the screen real estate so you don’t have to tap the back button as often. Split View is also available on the iPhone 6 Plus and iPhone 6S Plus.

(Image from wikiHow)

2/ Using your iPhone as a Personal Hotspot — Why get an iPad with Cellular if you only ever occasionally go online when you can use your iPhone, which already has that ability, to get your WiFi-only iPad online anyway? At least, if you can’t find wifi. Setting up a wireless hotspot on your iOS device is simple. You’ll need to make sure your cellular service plan supports the wireless hotspot feature (Vodafone NZ definitely does). If it doesn’t, check with your carrier for plan pricing and availability.
Also, you’ll need to make sure your iPhone or iPad has mobile data switched on, as if you do have and use a cellular-equipped (with SIM slot) iPad, you can also use that to get a Mac online when you’re somewhere and can’t find wifi, but cellular service is available.  Lastly, keep in mind that any data you use will most likely count against your plan’s data cap, so you’ll want to avoid downloading massive files while on the hotspot.
Open the Settings app and tap Personal Hotspot (it’s listed as Cellular Data on the iPad). Then, on the next screen, tap the Personal Hotspot switch so it’s in the “on” position (the switch will turn green). Next, make a note of your Wi-Fi password listed on this screen. If you don’t have Wi-Fi enabled on your iPhone or iPad, you’ll be asked to switch it on at this point.
On your Mac, open the Wi-Fi network menu, then select your iOS device’s name and enter the password as you would normally do when you connect to a Wi-Fi network.
When you’re done, go back to Settings > Personal Hotspot (or Settings > Cellular Data > Personal Hotspot) and switch off the hotspot.
If you’ve got an iPhone or cellular-equipped iPad running iOS 8 or later and a Mac running OS X Yosemite or later (and you have both devices set up under the same Apple ID) you can easily activate your iOS device’s hotspot feature from the comfort of your own Mac. For this to work, both devices need to meet Apple’s Continuity system requirements.  From there, it’s a simple matter of selecting the hotspot-enabled iOS device from the Wi-Fi menu in your Mac’s menubar.
This method works between iOS devices signed in under the same Apple ID: Go to Settings > Wi-Fi  on the device you want to connect to the hotspot, then select the hotspot-enabled iPhone or iPad.

3/ Enable Find My iPhone — Find My iPhone is a bit confusing from a privacy standpoint, but most people will benefit more from using it then not. With Find My iPhone enabled, you can track a lost phone using iCloud, and you can wipe your phone remotely. Apple will have access to the same information, so it boils down to whether you want to keep the data out of Apple’s hands (in which case you shouldn’t use an iPhone at all) or out of a thief’s hands.

4/ For security. disable certain home screen features — Head to Settings > Touch ID & Passcode and look for ‘Lock screen access’. Remove anything that gives someone access to your personal info, like the Today View, Siri and Wallet. You might also want to disable Reply with Message here, since someone could reply to an incoming message without unlocking your phone.

5/ Security: disable tracking — Head to Settings > Privacy > Location Services > System Services and turn off Frequent Locations. This is a Maps feature that tracks where you go often under the guise of improving search.
Turn off contact, photo, email, calendar or location access in apps that don’t need it: Head to Settings > Privacy. Here, you’ll see a list of a bunch of different system services, including location and contacts. These are the iPhone services you can grant apps access to. There might be some apps in here you don’t remember authorising or you just don’t want any more. Tap a service, then go through and disable any app you don’t want to access that service.

Five Tip Friday ~ A Mac Medley for Finder, Contacts, Safari and iTunes


1/ How to Force Quit an unresponsive app in macOS Sierra — Of course, try quitting it in the normal way first by choosing Quit from the app’s menu in the menu bar, or press Command (⌘) and while it’s held down, the Q key, or click-and-hold on the app’s icon in the Dock and choose Quit from the pop-out menu that appears.
But if a Mac app acts up and you have to stop it running, you may have to force it to quit so you can relaunch it. Here’s how you use Force Quit in macOS Sierra:
Choose Force Quit from the Apple () menu, or press Command-Option-Esccape (Esc at top left of your keyboard) all together.  (This is similar to pressing Control-Alt-Delete on a PC.)
Select the app in the Force Quit window, then click Force Quit.

2/ Automatically select the best email account in macOS Sierra — You can have Mail in macOS Sierra automatically select the best email account for a new message based on who the email is addressed to and what mailbox you selected when our began composing your new email.
With Mail up and running, click Mail, then Preferences from the top menus.
Click on the Composing tab.
There is a drop-down next to Send new messages from. Choose that to view your options.

3/ Archive information out of the Contacts program — In Apple’s Contacts app, Choose File > Export > Export vCard. This works for any individual card you have selected, but also for entire groups if you select one on the left, or All Contacts for all of them.
Once you’ve selected File > Export > Export vCard, your Mac will ask you where you’d like to save it, and you’re done! This’ll create a .vcf file in your chosen location, and if at any point you’d like to bring back those people, just double-click on the file to reimport their cards.

4/ Check for malicious extensions in Safari — If you find that your browser is still acting weird, you may need to look to see if the adware you picked up added an unwanted extension to Safari.
Safari extensions are software programs you can install to customise the way your browser works. For example, extensions can show news headlines in a bar below the toolbar, change the appearance of web content, or add buttons to the Safari toolbar.
In order to provide these features, extensions may access the content of the webpages you visit. It’s good practice to check which extensions you have installed and make sure you are familiar with what they do.
To check, open the program, then click on Safari > Preferences from the menus at the top. Choose the Extensions tab at the top, and you’ll see the list of what’s been installed. If you see something in your own list you’re unfamiliar with, you can either disable it by deselecting the checkbox I’ve indicated above or remove it completely using the Uninstall button.

5/ Open a playlist in a new window in iTunes 12.6 on macOS Sierra —  With the release of iTunes 12.6 on macOS Sierra, Apple restored the ability [YAY!] to open a playlist in a new window. Why this feature was ever removed shall forever remain a mystery. But here’s how you can open a playlist in a new window.
Launch iTunes.
Control-click or right-click on the playlist you want to open and select Open in New Window. That’s it.

Five Tip Friday ~ simple tips for macOS


1/ Change the default web browser in macOS Sierra — If you prefer another web browser to Safari (which I find excellent), you can change the macOS default. From the Apple () menu, choose System Preferences, then click General.
Choose your web browser from the ‘Default web browser’ pop-up menu.

2/ Set your default printer — If you have more than one printer, one thing you could do to make them slightly less annoying, though, is to choose which one to set as your default. If you print to a particular device way more often than another, it makes sense to always default to the last one you used when you choose File > Print.
Choose System Preferences from the Apple Menu at the top-left of your screen, and then click on Printers & Scanners.
You’ll see a list of your devices on the left, and you can pick which one you want as the default from the drop-down near the bottom of the window. Close the System Preferences window, and when you print something afterwards, your Mac will assume you want to use the device you set as the default.
You can click the drop-down show to temporarily switch to a different printer if you need to, but it will always revert back to the default for the next job.

3/ Move the cursor with your keyboard — If your mousing hand needs a break, or perhaps you need to move the mouse pointer one teeny-tiny pixel at a time, there’s a way to move the Mac mouse pointer with the keyboard rather than nudging the mouse or swiping your trackpad.
Turn on the Mac feature called Mouse Keys, which lets you move the Mac mouse pointer by tapping the keys on your numeric keypad or, if you don’t have a separate numeric keypad, by pressing a set of keys within the keyboard itself.
Open the Mac’s System Preferences by clicking the Apple menu in the top-left corner of the screen, select System Preferences. Click Accessibility, select Mouse & Trackpad in the left column, then check the Enable Mouse Keys checkbox. This lets you move your mouse pointer using a numeric trackpad: press the 8 key to nudge the Mac mouse up a tad. The 2 key will move the mouse down, while the 4 and 6 keys move the mouse left and right, respectively. The 7, 9, 1, and 3 keys move the Mac mouse up and to the left, up and to the right, down and to the left, and down and to the right. (There’s more on this at Here’s The Thing.)

4/ Force the Finder to restart in macOS Sierra — Represented by the blue icon with the smiling face, the macOS Sierra Finder is the home-base app for your Mac. You use it to organise and access almost everything on your Mac, including documents, images, movies, and any other files you have. However, sometimes you need to restart it if it’s acting up or if you’ve installed an app that requires a restart. To do so: in Finder, click the  menu and hold down the Shift key on your keyboard.
Click Force Quit Finder.
You can also hold down the ⌥ (option) key on your keyboard.
Click on the Finder icon in your Dock.
Choose Relaunch from the bottom of the pop-out list that appears.

5/ Search Google directly without even firing up a browser — You can use your Mac’s Spotlight to directly search using your default search engine. Type something in Spotlight that you want to search on Google, then, press Command (⌘) + B. It will open Safari with your search term…

Five tip Friday ~ The Calendar App and iCloud


1/ Edit appointment details using the Calendar Inspector in macOS Sierra — The Inspector window appears when you add a new event, or double-click on an existing event in the Calendar app in macOS Sierra, or click and event once and choose Command-e.
Inspector shows you all the details of your events, including who’s invited, and where and when you want the event to occur. Start typing an address and Calendar suggests matching locations. Start typing the name of a contact in your Address Book and Calendar suggests matching names based on contacts you’ve entered in the Contacts app.
You can even see your event locations on a miniature map in the Inspector. (If you click this mini map, the Maps app opens a full size view.)  The mini map includes an estimate of the travel time to your appointment destination from your current location in the event Inspector as well as the weather forecast for that day. (For travel time estimates, directions and weather, you need to turn on Location Services in System Preferences.)

2/ Use your iCloud account in macOS Sierra’s Calendar app — iCloud is included with macOS. Once you sign up for your free iCloud account, you can push calendar updates across your devices, share your iCloud Calendar, and see your calendar on the iCloud website.
If you have an iCloud account , you can use iCal to access and manage your iCloud calendars. If you set up the iCloud Calendar service on several devices and computers, your iCloud calendar and reminder information is kept up to date on each device and computer.
Set up your iCloud calendar account from System Preferences to see your iCloud-based calendars in the Calendar window. In the System Preferences app, click iCloud and sign in.
If this is your first time signing in from this computer, you’ll be asked if you want to use iCloud for contacts, calendars, and bookmarks. Make sure that the calendars option is selected (checked), then click Next.
If you’ve previously signed in to iCloud, you’ll see a list of iCloud services – select the check-box next to Calendars to have them sync.

3/ Add calendars to macOS Sierra’s Calendar from other services besides iCloud — You can use your iCloud account in macOS Sierra’s Calendar app to add an event, and this appears as if by magic on all your other Apple devices linked to that same Apple ID. But you can also add appointments from other popular services to your calendar in Calendar app, including Exchange, CalDAV, Facebook, and Yahoo:
Choose Apple Menu () > System Preferences.
Select Internet Accounts.
Click the Add Account (+) button at the bottom of the window.
Choose the account type you want to use, and enter your account credentials.
Make sure the option Calendars is selected (checked) to display the events associated with this account in the Calendar app. [These three Calendar tips came form the Apple World Today.]

4/ iCloud Drive and syncing iWork documents to your iOS devices — Those files aren’t necessarily being stored on your iPhone or iPad. Meaning that if you’re out and about, heading into a bad cell area may cause you to lose access to said files. Which is a bummer.
To check out what your situation, just open any of the iWork apps (Pages, Numbers, or Keynote) on your iOS device. When you do so, you’ll see a list of your documents of that type. If some of the files are in iCloud but aren’t downloaded, you’ll see a tiny cloud icon on those.
Of course, you can tap to download any one you’d like, but if what you really want is to keep all documents of that kind on your iPhone or iPad at all times, head over to your Settings. Scroll down until you see the section for the app you’d like to download stuff for and tap it.
Within that, look for the “On-Demand Downloads” toggle.
Turn that OFF, and everything you’ve got within that app will download so you can keep all your documents on your iPhone. This is great if you’re going on a trip and don’t want to use cellular data, for example, or if you just know you always need access to your spreadsheets. But be careful—I strongly suggest that you go into the app in question and make certain that the process has completed before you hit the road. You might even want to turn on Airplane Mode for the device and try to open a file or two. Paranoid? Heck, that’s just who I am. Almost a decade of tech support has traumatized taught me well.

5/ iSee the status of uploads in iCloud Drive — While we’re messing with iCloud,  you can turn on Finder’s Status Bar, the option for which is under the View menu click on the iCloud Drive option in Finder’s sidebar (shown above), and suddenly you’ll get a lot more information about your uploads.
Also turn the Path Bar on (View > Show Path Bar, shown below). This is helpful if you’d like to have a trail of breadcrumbs, so to speak, leading back within the folder structure you’ve navigated through – this appears at the bottom of folder windows. Any of the location icons in the Path Bar are double-clickable, as well, to return you to someplace you’ve been. Useful if you tend to drill way deep down into folders and then forget where you came from! Not that I ever do that myself, oh no.