Jobs & iPod, LG OLED investment, Apple TV hints, Aston Martin & Mini CarPlay


The day Steve Jobs launched the iPod and changed Apple forever — The iPod showed Apple that it could be more than just a conventional computer company, and that changed everything. iPod sales are so embarrassingly low now, Apple hasn’t reported the sales numbers for years. The iPhone is the new music player. (And for some, the iPod touch—which endures for now.) But John Martellero has a story to tell.

Apple invests $2.7B in LG’s OLED production for future iPhones — In an effort to expand availability of OLED displays for future iPhones, Apple has reportedly sunk $2.7 billion US into partner LG’s manufacturing capabilities.

Apple reveals 4K and HDR plans in iTunes, hinting revamped Apple TV may arrive soon — Users have found that some new releases on the iTunes Store list availability in 4K resolution and high dynamic range, suggesting support for ultra-high-resolution video formats may soon come to iTunes, along with new Apple TV hardware.

Aston Martin & Mini join Apple’s roster of CarPlay vehicles — Several models from Aston Martin and Mini are now listed as CarPlay-ready on Apple’s website, representing the brands’ first entries into the platform.

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Unarchiver, Jobs’ widow and The Atlantic, FileMaker 16, 64-bit Scrivener


MacPaw has acquired the Unarchiver, a free Mac utility that uncompresses a wide range of files

MacPaw scoops up Unarchiver, a macOS file extraction utility — Oleksandr Kosovan, the CEO and founder of MacPaw, says his company will maintain the Unarchiver, keep it up-to-date, localise into popular languages and implement design improvements. As before, the Unarchiver will be free for all Mac users. All the apps and app-related assets will be transferred to MacPaw’s developer account. [Your Mac ‘unarchives’ cross platform compressed .zip files already – the Unarchiver deals with almost everything else as well.]

Laurene Powell Jobs’s Emerson Collective buys majority stake in The Atlantic — The Emerson Collective is an organisation led by Laurene Powell Jobs, the widow of former Apple Chief Executive Steve Jobs . The EC is buying a majority stake in The Atlantic, one of the longest-running publications in the US. The Atlantic is currently a profitable venture — its print circulation is growing, and its web audience rose 36% in the first half of 2017.

Hands on: FileMaker Pro 16 adds design and integration features to long-time Mac database app — This year’s upgrade to FileMaker Pro 16 brings small but key improvements to the database app, and AppleInsider gives you a brief overview.

Literature & Latte Announces Scrivener 3: a 64-bit App with Consolidated Features — And there was much rejoicing in the writing world, because Literature & Latte announced Scrivener 3! It will include a rewrite to become a 64-bit app, a new interface, and a floor-to-ceiling rewrite. The company also said the release focused on, “consolidating and simplifying what’s already there.”

The Apocalypticon ~ Sans Sharif, climate instability, bot-soldiers, Trump of course, piggybacking flood rabbits, Android virus vulnerability


Best headline this week: ‘Pakistan now Sans Sharif’ — Ever since the Panama Papers were anonymously leaked back in 2015, there has been a major shift in the political situation in many countries. One such is Pakistan, where the names of numerous members of the Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif’s family were spotted in the papers.
To deflect examination, Nawaz Sharif’s daughter Maryam Nawaz submitted photocopies of several documents in order to deny corruption, but the documents were dated February 6, 2006 and contained Microsoft’s Calibri font. Which wasn’t commercially available until January 30, 2007.
Hah! Sharif has now been disqualified from his position as a part of the court’s final verdict of the case.

Climate change is fostering instability, bot attacks and Trump’s military — Climate change will escalate instability across the globe and make it harder for the US military to conduct its operations, according to two former admirals, a retired general, a once-ambassador to Nigeria, and the former undersecretary to the Secretary of Defense. Nothing they said, however, was all that new. In fact, the Department of Defense has known about, and sometimes planned for, the security threats created by climate change for well over a decade.
Maybe that’s why they want attacking bot-swarms to replace soldiers? Even though top soldiers have warned about the dangers of such things. Will Trump listen or care? probably not, as Trump’s mind-defying ban on transgender troops certainly cuts down the pool or available humans who want to kill people, sorry ‘defend’ people.
Trump: I consulted the military about the transgender ban. The military: no you didn’t. [This is what ‘streamlined government means, people.]

Researchers have discovered multiple unpatched vulnerabilities in radiation monitoring devices that could be leveraged by attackers to reduce personnel safety, delay detection of radiation leaks, or help international smuggling of radioactive material. Ruben Santamarta, a security consultant at Seattle-based IOActive, at the Black Hat conference on Wednesday, saying that radiation monitors supplied by Ludlum, Mirion and Digi contain multiple vulnerabilities.
But vulnerabilities are also opportunities. The Black Hat and Def Con security conferences now have a booming side business in recruitingWild rabbits escape floods on the backs of NZ sheep — Really. This remarkable scene was captured by a New Zealand farmer who said he’d never seen anything like it.

Antivirus for Android is pretty bad — Researchers at Georgia Tech who analyzed 58 mainstream options found that many were relatively easy to defeat, often because didn’t take a nuanced and diverse approach to malware detection. So have fun with those, Meanwhile, the forthcoming Apple iOS 11 will disable “Auto join” for any network which suffers from low speed issues or is deemed to be generally unreliable. Good-oh.

Futurology ~ lil Interstellar, origami robots, NASA flight times, embryo edits, age of anti-age, Zika drones, med-maggots, Woolly Mammoth comeback, what we expected in ’87


Humanity’s first ‘interstellar’ spacecraft — Last year, extraterrestrial exploration venture Breakthrough Initiatives announced an ambitious plan to send lots of tiny spacecraft to our nearest neighbouring star system, Alpha Centauri. The project ‘Breakthrough Starshot’ is focused on launching lightweight ‘nanocraft’ to the stars at rip-roaring speeds. Recently, the project took a big leap toward, having achieved its ultimate goal by successfully sending six test craft into Low Earth Orbit.
~ Or, it’s that bit that fell out of my toaster.

Inspired by the traditional Japanese art of origami, self-folding robots can go places and do things traditional robots cannot — A major drawback to these devices, however, has been the need to equip them with batteries or wires. Researchers from Harvard have found a new way to overcome this problem, by designing folding robots that can be controlled using a wireless magnetic field.
~ I just imagine a medical one of these in my body, and some brat hacking it … eek!

NASA to cut flight time in half — For almost a half-century there’s been a clear speed limit on most commercial air travel: 1062kph/660 miles per hour, the rate at which a typical-size plane traveling at 9144 metres/30,000 feet breaks the sound barrier and creates a 48km (30-mile) wide, continuous sonic boom.
That may be changing. NASA says it will soon begin taking bids for construction of a demo model of a plane able to reduce the sonic boom to something like the hum you’d hear inside a Mercedes-Benz on the interstate. The agency’s researchers say their design, a smaller-scale model of which was successfully tested in a wind tunnel at the end of June, could cut the six-hour flight time from New York to Los Angeles in half.
~ Of course, landing in Wichita would achieve the same time reduction.

Embryo edit — The first known attempt at creating genetically modified human embryos in the United States has been carried out by a team of researchers in Portland, Oregon. The effort, led by Shoukhrat Mitalipov of Oregon Health and Science University, involved changing the DNA of a large number of one-cell embryos with the gene-editing technique CRISPR. Mitalipov is believed to have broken new ground both in the number of embryos experimented upon and by demonstrating that it is possible to safely and efficiently correct defective genes that cause inherited diseases.
~ And you thought it was for potatoes. 

Tech to end faux SOS calls — A researcher at Carnegie Mellon University has developed an intelligent system that is helping the US Coast Guard to distinguish and weed out prank mayday calls that cost it up to millions of dollars a year when it leads to flying or motoring out for pointless rescue missions. The program, created by Carnegie Mellon’s Rita Singh, creates a barcode of a person’s voice, deciphering whether the caller really is on a boat or actually in a house somewhere. It can unmask repeat pranksters since it can pick up telltale markers and match them up.
~ AI will get you. 

Scientists working on anti-aging — Implants of stem cells that make fresh neurons in the brain were found to put the brakes on aging in older mice, keeping them more physically and mentally fit for months, and extending their lives by 10-15% compared to untreated animals.
Another effort involves advanced machine learning, a horde of lab mice, and the blood of 600 especially long-lived Estonians. And there’s always a mysterious emu gene
~ Now I am picturing long-lived Estonian emus with brain implants. 

Anti-Zika mosquito factory — A  white Mercedes Sprinter van began a delivery route along the streets of Fancher Creek, a residential neighborhood on the southeastern edge of Fresno, California. Its cargo was 100,000 live mosquitoes, all male, all incapable of producing offspring. As it crisscrossed Fancher Creek’s 200 acres, it released its payload, piping out swarms of sterile Aedes aegypti into the air. It’ll do the same thing every day until the end of December.
~ And eventually, if they still have libidos anyway, the mosquito problem will literally die out. 

Maggot med-bots — Tiny cylinders of hydrogel, a synthetic material that sucks up or spits out water depending on its temperature, have been developed by Franck Vernerey, whose lab is at the University of Colorado Boulder, to induce these makeshift medicinal maggots to creep through tubes by cycling them through warm, then cool water.
~ Yuck! How about a nice laser-curtain thing that looks cool instead? 

Wooly mammoth recreation may now actually be possible — Dr George Church is the inventor of CRISPR and one of the minds behind the Human Genome Project. He’s no longer content just reading and editing DNA; now he wants to make new life. In Ben Mezrich’s latest book, Wooly: The True Story of the Quest to Revive One of History’s Most Iconic Extinct Creatures, Church and his Harvard lab try to do the impossible, and clone an extinct Woolly mammoth back into existence.
~ And then they’ll turn out to be friendly and cuddly, and then what will Spielberg do? 

What we thought we’d have now, 30 years ago — Fifty years ago the first Consumer Electronics Show was held in New York City, giving local nerds a sneak peek at all the electronic toys arriving in 1967. Twenty years later, Art Vuolo attended the Summer edition of the trade show with a giant camera on his shoulder, giving us a wonderful time capsule of what was drool-worthy 30 years ago.
~ Smart people,  please. If only. 

Five Tip Friday ~ Safari, privacy, wiFi and the Help Viewer


1/ Zoom in Safari using a Magic Trackpad — In the Trackpad or Mouse system preference pane, click the Scroll & Zoom tab, and then you can opt to check or uncheck Smart Zoom. Now, when you double-tap with two fingers, Safari and other apps will zoom the item tapped upon to fill the screen. Two-finger double-tap again, and it zooms back out to the normal view. This zoom remains preserved when you go back a page and back forward.
Apple also offers a systemwide zoom in the Accessibility preference pane: open the pane, select Zoom, and you can opt to enable or disable the Use Scroll Gesture with Modifier Keys to Zoom. (The Control key is the default modifier.)

2/ Prevent tracking in Safari —  macOS High Sierra will have a feature called Intelligent Tracking Prevention, and Sierra already has some anti-tracking abilities. Safari uses machine learning to prevent tracking in the browser, specially cross-site tracking. Open Safari and go to Preferences (press ⌘+,, or Safari > Preferences in the menu).
Click on the Privacy tab in the window that pops up.
You’ll see a new Website Tracking section (shown above) with two items: ‘Prevent cross-site tracking’ and ‘Ask websites not to track me’. The latter is also found in macOS Sierra and is equivalent to a Do Not Track setting. However, most websites won’t voluntarily honour this setting, and aren’t even legally obligated to do so.
(Apple also streamlined cookie blocking in Safari 11. Instead of having the usual settings like Always block, Allow from current website only, Allow from websites I visit, Always allow, in macOS High Sierra you will also just get the option to block all cookies, since Intelligent Tracking Prevention does the rest.)

3/ Use Modifier Keys with Safari history — You can click-and-hold on Safari’s back button to see a list of where you’ve been (above). This lets you quickly jump back to somewhere without hitting that back button several times.
There are a couple of things you can do with this button to make it even cooler: if you’re looking for URLs instead, hold down the Option key on your keyboard before you click and click-and-hold the back button to do just that.
If you want to keep your existing page as a tab or a window before you open something from your history, that’s easy too. Obviously, when you click the back button without holding it, Safari will go back to the last page you visited. Hold down the Shift key on your keyboard and click that button, and the browser will instead open your last page in a new window. If you hold down Command, your last page will open in a new tab.
This Shift-or-Command trick also works if you have the history view open (History menu>Show All History). If you click-and-hold on your back button to bring up that little popover, holding down Shift and choosing any of the pages you visited opens it in a new window; Command opens it in a new tab. This behavior is actually all through Safari: shift-click a bookmark or a history item, and it’ll open in a new window; Command-click a link, and it’ll open in a new tab.
(If your version of Safari isn’t behaving in the way described here, be sure to check out your settings at Safari > Preferences under the Tabs section.)

4/ Changing your WiFi Password on an AirPort device — Sometimes you’ve may want to change your Wi-Fi password – perhaps you gave it to someone you now wish you hadn’t, or maybe your roommate moved out, but you’ve seen them outside your house leeching off your connection. (I’m sure that’s happened to someone.) If you have an Apple router (like a Time Capsule, AirPort Extreme, AirPort Express), it’s really simple to change this.
Launch AirPort Utility (it’s in the Applications > Utilities folder, which you can easily get to using Finder’s Go menu.)
When AirPort Utility opens, click on your AirPort device and choose Edit.
You may have to enter the password for your device to do this; this is usually the same as your Wi-Fi password, but if it’s not, then…uh…just keep on guessing until you figure it out. Fingers crossed. (You might consider going and checking your keychain to see if it’s stored there if you’re having trouble.)
Once you click Edit, choose the Wireless tab at the top. There you’ll find your wireless password.
So just type what you’d like your new one to be into both the first password box and the Verify Password box. Be sure that the ‘Remember this password in my keychain’ choice is on, too, but don’t mess with any other settings there unless you know what you’re doing.
After your options are set, click Update. AirPort Utility will then of course warn you of what you’re about to do, and restart the device – full service will recommence after reboot.
Keep two things in in mind: first, changing your Wi-Fi password doesn’t change your base station device’s password; if you’d like to make that the same, head over to the Base Station tab within AirPort Utility.
Secondly, everything you own that connects to your Wi-Fi – iPhones, iPads, computers, Apple TVs, and printers, for example – will need to be reconnected to your network afterward, so don’t undertake this task lightly as you’ll be typing the new password into all those devices. It’s no fun to spend the evening changing passwords on printers if you haven’t planned for it.

5/ Use Terminal to send the macOS Help Viewer to the back — You can access your Mac’s built-in support info by choosing Help from the menu at the top of any program. There is one irritation, though: the Help Viewer window always sits on top of everything else, even if you switch programs. It will stay in front until you close it (although you can Minimise it into the Dock by clicking the orange button at top left). Staying on top of everything can be frustrating  when you’re attempting to try out a solution that the help pages suggest.
Luckily, you can change this behavior through Terminal (it’s in your Utilities folder inside the Applications folder). To do so, copy the following command…

defaults write com.apple.helpviewer DevMode -bool YES

…and paste it into the Terminal program after the flashing prompt. When the command is pasted in, press Return, and then the Help Viewer window will behave just like most of the other windows on your Mac: if you click on another window or program, it’ll move to the background.
If you decide you want to put things back the way they were, just go back to Terminal, replace the “YES” with “NO” in the command, and press Return:

defaults write com.apple.helpviewer DevMode -bool NO

iPod shuffle & nano killed, App Store dominates Google, iOS 11 doc scanning, HomePod info safe, GoPro QuickStories


Apple kills iPod nano, iPod shuffle lines after nearly 12 years of service — Ending an era, the iPod nano and iPod shuffle have been officially discontinued, leaving only the A8 iPod touch as the sole survivor of the iPod line.
Apple has offset the loss of the legacy iPods by doubling the capacity of the iPod touch to 32 gigabytes for NZ$319/US$199, or 128 gigabytes for NZ$479/US$299. The touch still has the same A8 processor, but the 16- and 64-gigabyte models have been deleted from the simplified lineup. [The touch is basically an iPhone without calling. In a WiFi zone it can message, get email and browse the ’net, and it can of course run most apps.]

Apple iOS App Store continues dominance over Google Play in earnings battle, gap widening — While iOS App Store purchase volume may be losing ground from a marketshare perspective by number of downloads, Apple continues to dominate the market in consumer spending by a wide margin and is still growing.
Meanwhile, Google plans to merge Play Music & YouTube Red into new service, creating a stronger service in the face of competition like the increasingly video-saturated Apple Music.

Hands-on with iOS 11’s new Document Scanner — When iOS 11 debuts this fall, users will be able to take advantage of a new feature in the Notes app that automatically senses and scans documents, makes crops, adjusts image settings to remove tilt and glare, and allows on-the-fly markups using a finger or Apple Pencil. AppleInsider goes hands on with the function in this video.

Aha’s Take On Me recreated on ARKit — Trixi Studios has recreated the hand sketched style from the 1980’s A-ha Take On Me music video, but instead of working with a series of drawings they let ARKit do the heavy lifting.

Unlike Roomba, Apple confirms it won’t upload, share or sell your home data from HomePod — With vacuum maker iRobot looking to sell user’s house maps to smart home vendors, an AppleInsider reader asked Apple what it planned to do with data collected by the HomePod’s room mapping technology. Unsurprisingly, Apple confirmed it has no intention of saving or sharing information about a user’s home layout.

GoPro launches QuikStories automated video creation tool, rebrands GoPro app — Camera manufacturer GoPro on Thursday officially launched QuikStories, a video creation solution that automatically pulls content off Hero 5 and Hero 5 Session cameras and generates custom movies complete with special effects, music syncing and more.

Apogee Thunderbolt, staggering business, Trump’s transgender soldiers & STEM, Apple forests


Apogee adds direct monitoring support for its Ensemble Thunderbolt and Element hardware to Apple Logic Pro X — Audio equipment manufacturer Apogee has updated its Apogee Ensemble Thunderbolt and Element series audio interface software with Direct Monitoring support, allowing for latency-free recording and monitoring without additional hardware in Logic Pro X.

Apple does a ‘staggering’ business of $5,546 per square foot at its retail stores — With sales per square foot viewed as a major component of retail success, according to industry data provided by eMarkter, the #1 retailer in sales per square foot is Apple, which did a staggering US$5546 per square foot.

Apple’s Tim Cook speaks out against President Trump’s ban on transgender soldiers — Apple CEO Tim Cook took to Twitter on Wednesday to protest US President Donald Trump’s ban on transgender soldiers, joining other tech executives like Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg, Google’s Sundar Pichai and Twitter’s own Jack Dorsey. But this hasn’t stopped Cook ‘helping’ Trump on his education policies.

Apple Wants to responsibly manage 1 million acres of forest — Apple has a new video in its series of Earth Day cartoons explaining the company’s environmentally-oriented accomplishments. The new one is called Can an apple grow a forest? and talks about how a dinner meeting with Senior VP Lisa Jackson led to the decision to buy or grow a forest. The result, according to the video, was an effort to put 1 million acres of forest under responsible management by 2020.

iPad multitasking in iOS 11, coolest ARKit demos, cochlear implants & iPhone, internet TV grows


Take a closer look at Apple’s new iPad multitasking features in iOS 11 video — Apple’s iPad will become more powerful and capable than ever with this fall’s launch of iOS 11, particularly with new multitasking features that make it easier than ever to run multiple apps at once. AppleInsider offers a closer look on how it all works.

Inside iOS 11: The coolest Apple ARKit demos created so far — ARKit will instantaneously become the largest augmented reality platform in the world – but to capitalise on that, developers will need to come up with awesome uses of the technology. With only a few weeks under their belt using Apple’s iOS 11, content creators have already begun to impress in big ways.

New Cochlear hearing implant tech will stream directly from iPhones & other Apple devices — An upcoming Cochlear sound processor, the Nucleus 7, will reportedly let people stream audio directly to hearing implants from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch.

Internet-connected television use including Apple TV growing to over 168 million in 2017 — Apple has grown its body of streaming hardware users, but still lags behind offerings from Amazon, Google, and Roku, according to a new research study.

Best loyalty, patent payment, TSA rules, Chrome update, 3 US plants, serious Siri, Safari Tech Preview, 1Password’s secret log, Verbose Mode, new USB spec


Apple ranks among ‘Best-in-Class’ brands for loyalty in new marketing study — Among major corporate brands, Apple has some of the highest loyalty and satisfaction rates with the US public, according to the results of a recent survey. Apple achieved a 91% loyalty score, and slightly lower satisfaction of 85%, said marketing firm Fluent.

Wisconsin court orders Apple pay $506M for infringing on WARF patent — A US district court judge on Monday ruled Apple must pay $506 million in damages for infringing on a microprocessor technology IP owned by the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s patent licensing body, adding $272 million to an initial $234 decision reached almost two years ago.

New TSA rules will require airline travellers to remove Apple MacBooks and iPads from bags — In the coming weeks and months, travellers will no longer be able to keep small MacBook models or iPads in their bag when passing through security screenings, and will instead have to place them in a separate bin to be X-rayed, the US Transportation Security Administration announced on Wednesday.

Google Chrome browser update delivers support for MacBook Pro Touch Bar — Google on Tuesday released a new version of its Chrome web browser for Mac with support for Apple’s latest MacBook Pro with Touch Bar hardware, bringing a few crucial control options to the laptop’s OLED strip.

Apple will bring 3 manufacturing plants to US, President Trump reveals — Apple is apparently planning to build three manufacturing facilities in the US, President Donald Trump has announced, though such facilities are most likely to be through a partnership with Foxconn or some other assembly company.

Are you taking Siri-on-your-Mac Siri-ously? Robert LeVitus was surprised to discover many Mac users have no idea that Siri, Apple’s intelligent personal assistant, has been available on their Macs since the release of macOS Sierra nearly a year ago. “If you’re among them, may I suggest it’s about time you acquaint yourself with the joys of using Siri-on-your-Mac?”

Apple Releases Safari Technology Preview 36 with 27 bug fixes and improvements — Apple released Safari Technology Preview 36 (Safari TP36) on Wednesday. Safari’s tech preview releases are aimed at developers, and are similar to the developer betas for macOS and iOS. This release includes some 27 different bug fixes and other improvements. [The previous version did not work on the Hight Sierra Public Beta.]

Find 1Password’s hidden log of past generated passwords — Did you know 1Password keeps a hidden log of every password it has generated?

How to start up in single-user mode or verbose mode in macOS Sierra — If you’re an advanced user who’s comfortable with UNIX, you can use single-user mode or verbose mode to help isolate issues related to startup.

USB 3.0 Promoter Group touts new USB 3.2 spec — USB just keeps getting faster and faster, with the USB 3.0 Promoter Group (of which Apple is a member) announcing the upcoming release of the USB 3.2 specification yesterday. It’s considered an “incremental update” to USB 3.1, but it’s an important one since it defines multi-lane operation for USB 3.2 hosts and devices, meaning that devices can allow for two lanes of 5 Gbps (gigabit per second) data transfer or two lanes of 10 Gbps transfer. Connecting a USB 3.2 host to a USB 3.2 device would now provide transfer speeds of over 2 GB/sec (gigabytes per second) over existing USB Type-C cables certified for SuperSpeed USB 10 Gbps using existing USB-C cables if they’re certified for SuperSpeed USB.

Medical ID, Xiaomi overtakes Apple for Chinese 4th place, iOS 11 Public Beta 3


How to use the Medical ID feature in Apple’s iOS Health app — A lesser-known but theoretically life-saving feature of Apple’s iOS Health app is Medical ID, a quick guide for nurses, doctors, ambulance crews and others in an emergency. Here’s how to set it up on an iPhone running iOS 10.

Xiaomi overtakes Apple for fourth place in the Chinese smartphone market — After six consecutive quarters of growth, Chinese smartphone shipments fell 3% to 113 million in the second quarter (Q2) 2017. China-based Huawei shipped over 23 million to lead the market for the second quarter in a row, according to the Canalys research firm.
Xiaomi, a privately owned Chinese electronics company, was the standout vendor as it overtook Apple to take fourth place. It shipped just under 15 million smartphones in China, up more than 60% sequentially.

Apple Releases iOS 11 Public Beta 3 — Apple has released iOS 11 Public Beta 3. The release comes the day after the company seeded iOS 11 Developer Beta 4 to developers. Apple doesn’t include detailed release notes with the public beta releases, but each release includes bug fixes, tweaks, and new approaches for features in iOS 11.

Third macOS Beta, Flash finally dead? More money, OmmWriter, Handy Note, country music, Adobe Nimbus leak, free apps


Apple deploys third public beta releases of macOS 10.13 High Sierra (and iOS 11 and tvOS 11) — Registered members of Apple’s public beta testing program now have a third pre-release build of iOS 11 and macOS 10.13 High Sierra available to download, arriving just a day after the fourth developer beta. macOS High Sierra includes improvements to Mail and Safari, more efficient file transfer performance, improved security, augmented and virtual reality support, new Siri voices, HEVC video support, and more.

Adobe announces end-of-life plans, will stop distribution in 2020 — Citing pressure from HTML5, WebGL, and WebAssembly, Adobe has announced that it will end development and distribution of Flash Player at the end of 2020, and encourage content creators to migrate any existing Flash content to open formats. [Apple has long been leery of Flash as buggy and a vector for malware.]

Credit Suisse: Apple will double its services revenue by 2020 — In a note to clients. Credit Suisse said Apple investors can expect the company to double revenue from its services segment by 2020.

Mac word processor gets you in The Zone — OmmWriter is a tool which makes it easier for you to concentrate. Based on a natural setting, it effectively insulates your mind from distractions and sets up a direct line between your thoughts and your words. Today sees the release of the new OmmWriter Gaia for Mac (a PC version is not yet available).

Virtual Stickies on your Mac — Handy Note is a finely crafted sticky note app that allows you to quickly jot down important information and keep it easily visible on your screen. It costs US$7.99.

Latest Apple Music ad uses motorcycles, patriotism & country star Brantley Gilbert — Apple’s latest promotional video for Apple Music, now online, takes a different tack from some other recent spots by featuring country singer Brantley Gilbert. [It looks and sounds like a cynical appeal to Trump supporters.]

Adobe accidentally leaks cloud-based ‘Nimbus’ photo editing tool for Mac — Adobe has accidentally let an early version of Project Nimbus, a primarily cloud-based photo editor, slip out to some Creative Cloud subscribers.

Another bundle, this time free  … Eight Mac apps comprises the MacLovin’ Freebie Bundle, and all you have to do is be signed up for the Apple World Today deals newsletter. [Photo Lemur is pretty amazing.]

The Rock rocks Siri, ‘iPhone 8’ tech, Penny gets Apple Pay


Dwayne The Rock Johnson promotes Apple team-up on Rock X Siri: Dominate the Day Dwayne The Rock Johnson has declared that he has partnered with Apple to develop The Rock X Siri: Dominate the Day — the short film, which amounts to a long commercial showing off Siri’s capabilities, is now live at the above link. [Seriously, there was an ad announcing a commercial.]

Non-Apple chip suppliers seeing slowdown as Apple chain builds up to ‘iPhone 8’ — Although chipmakers in the Apple supply chain saw their orders accelerate in June, suppliers for non-Apple devices have encountered unexpectedly slow orders this year —possibly because device makers are waiting to see what the ‘iPhone 8’ and/or ‘iPhone 7s’ will bring to the table. [Can’t copy something till you know what it is.]

Apple investing in chemical deposition gear suitable for iPhone OLED screen production — A report from the supply chain suggests that Apple is investing in equipment to assist in supplying OLED screens to the ‘iPhone 8’ and beyond, but who will run the gear and for what purpose is not known.

Apple partner Foxconn may announce ‘Made in America’ plans this week — Foxconn may announce as soon as this week in Washington DC its plans for producing electronics in the US – specifically in Detroit and Wisconsin, although it is unknown whether Apple will play a part. [The plant is said to offer jobs to lost of robots, and about 30 accountants. Sorry, Big Orange Guy.]

JCPenney begins offering full support for Apple Pay across US — JCPenney is now accepting Apple Pay across all US locations, the department store chain announced on Monday, including support for store-branded credit cards and associated rewards points.