Tag Archives: free

Five Tip Friday ~ Memories, screenshots, Preview views Exif data, wrangles GIFs


1/ Use Memories in the Photos app in macOS Sierra — Apple revamped the Photos App in macOS Sierra, adding a Memories feature, which is designed to help you rediscover favourite and forgotten moments from deep in your photo library. Memories automatically creates curated collections of your most meaningful photos and videos.
To use it, open the Photos app and click Memories in the left sidebar. You’ll see a summary of the Memory’s contents, chosen from the best photos in your library. Choose Show All to see every photo and video in the Memory.
Scroll down to see the people included in the Memory, a map showing where the photos and videos were taken, and a list of related Memories for you to explore. At the bottom of your Memory, you can find options to add the Memory to your favorites or delete it.

2/ Save a Memory movie in macOS Sierra — Scroll to the bottom of the screen and tap or click Add to Favorite Memories. You’ll find it in the Favorite [sic] Memories album of your Photos app. If you decide that you don’t want to save a Memory anymore, tap or click Remove from Favorite Memories.
When you add a Memory to your Favorites [sic ditto], you preserve it and keep it from going away when Photos creates new Memories. You can also share your experiences with friends and family. On your Mac, you can share the photos and videos from your Memory when you click.
On your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch, play a Memory movie, then tap on it to show the editing and sharing options. Tap  and choose to share the movie through Messages, Mail, iCloud Photo Sharing, and your favourite social media sites.

3/ Directly paste Screenshots into Documents — First, hold down Command (⌘) + Shift + 4, to bring up the screenshot selection tool.
Next, hold down Control, and make your selection on the screen using your mouse.Click and drag diagonally, and when you let go, the screenshot is captured.
Open whatever document you want to paste the selection into, including email messages and web-page windows of sites you control, or Facebook, say, and press Command (⌘) +  V or right-click/control-click and choose Paste from the pop-out Contextual Menu, or select Paste from the Edit menu, and the screenshot you captured is pasted right there.

4/ View photo metadata, called Exif, using Preview Inspector — Preview is a superb and deceptively simple app built into macOS that has multiple uses, like viewing PDFs, photos and more. Preview Inspector is one its powerful, hidden features that makes Preview so useful.
Short for Exchangeable image file format, Exif data contains important information about a photo. Location, camera model, color space, exposure and more are contained in each image. If you need to quickly look at this information, using Preview is the easiest way.
Find the image you want in Finder, then right-click (or hold down your Control key and click on it) and select Open With Preview fro the menu that pops out.


Next, in Preview, click on Tools > Show Inspector in the menubar (or press ⌘ + I on your keyboard).
In the next window that pops up, click on the Exif tab. You’ll then see all of the pertinent information about your image.

5/ View and grab GIF frames in Preview — Open the GIF image in Preview – if this doesn’t happen when you double-click a GIF file, drag-and-drop the GIF onto the Preview icon in the Dock, or use macOS’s Quick Look feature to open the image (click the GIF’s icon ONCE, then press the spacebar, then click ‘Open with Preview’ in the upper right of the Quick Look window.
In Preview’s sidebar, scroll to the frame you want to save. Control- or Right-click and select Export As.
You can then export it in the file formats JPEG, PNG or PDF.

Five Tip Friday ~ Finding things on Macs, secure Keychain notes, disabling Safari autoplay


1/ Use Boolean Oprators in Spotlight — All you need to do is insert the words AND, OR, or NOT (or a minus sign) into searches, depending on what you’re trying to find. For example, if you want to see files on your system with either ‘project’ or ‘writing’ in the title, invoke Spotlight by clicking on the magnifying glass in the upper-right corner of my screen or by using its keyboard shortcut (Command-Spacebar), and type: title:project OR title:writing
Note there’s no space after the colon.
Alternatively, you can find items from two separate dates: date:6/6/66 OR date:17/6/17
Use NOT (or the minus sign -) to exclude file types, for example, from your results:
date:6/6/66 NOT kind:pdf
If you have any more questions or would just like to see more ways to use this, check out the examples Apple posted on this support page.

2/ Find tagged items in macOS — If you’ve set up your Safari-like tabs to work in folders in macOS Sierra, it’s easy to find the items you’ve tagged. Click the Finder icon in the Dock to open a Finder window and do any of the following:
Search for a tag: Enter the tag color or name in the search field, then select the tag from the suggestions.
Ask Siri. Say something like: Find files with a red tag.
Select a tag in the sidebar: To see everything with a certain tag, click the tagin the Finder sidebar.
To change the items you see in the sidebar, choose Finder > Preferences, click Tags, then select the tags you want to see.
Arrange items by a tag: Click the Item Arrangement button , then choose Tags.
Sort items by a tag: In any view, choose View > Show View Options, then select the Tags checkbox. In List view and Cover Flow, move the pointer over the Tags column, then click it. Click the column name again to reverse the sort order.

3/ Go directly to a specific folder in macOS Sierra — You can jump directly to a specific folder in macOS Sierra: In the Finder, click the Go menu in the menu bar, then choose one of the following:
Enclosing Folder: Choose this option to open the parent folder for the current window. For example, if you’re in your Downloads folder, this option opens your All My Files, Documents, or other listed folders: Choose a folder from the list.
Recent Folders: Choose a folder from the submenu. (The submenu shows up to 10 recently opened folders.)
Go to Folder: Type the folder’s pathname (for example, /Library/Fonts/ or ~/Pictures/), then click Go.
A slash at the beginning of a pathname indicates that the starting point is the top level of your computer’s folder structure. A slash at the end indicates that this is a path to a folder, rather than a file.
A tilde (~) indicates your home folder. Most of your personal folders, such as Documents, Music, and Pictures, are in your home folder.
If you’re having trouble finding a folder, make sure you’re spelling its name correctly and typing the full path, including slashes.
You can also ask Siri to, for instance, ‘Open the home folder.’
(To reveal the hidden macOS Library folder, press and hold the Option key on your keyboard, then choose Library as it will be revealed in the Go list.)

4/  Using Keychain’s Secure Notes feature — If you need to store private information on your Mac like an Inland Revenue number, there is a feature of a built-in program called Keychain Access that’ll let you store notes in a very secure way. If you’d like to take a look, open the app first—you can get to it within the Applications > Utilities folder by using Finder’s Go menu.
Once the app is open, click on “Secure Notes” from the sidebar and then click on the keychain where you’d like to store yours.
Use either the login or iCloud keychain for this – the only difference is that the iCloud one will sync these notes to any other Macs that are set up with your iCloud Keychain. (The notes won’t sync to your iOS devices, though.)
Once you’ve selected both options, click the plus button at the bottom-left corner of the window. Then you can give your new note a name and type the stuff you want to keep private under the Note field.
Once finished typing, click Add and your note will appear in the list. If you want to look at it at any point afterward, just go back to Keychain Access, click Secure Notes in the sidebar, and choose the keychain you added it to.
Double-click on the note to view it, and when you do, you won’t see the secret info you typed yet—yay! It’s still all hidden and private and stuff.
You’ll need to click the “Show Note” box I’ve called out above, and then your Mac will make you type in your login password to prove that you have the right to view its contents.
Melissa Holt likes this method better than using iCloud’s password-protected notes because it’s sort of “security by obscurity” – no one will likely think to look in Keychain Access for your notes. Which is good if you’re the type who doesn’t want anyone to even know that you have secrets to keep! Plus, you only have to remember one password – your Mac’s login one – which makes losing access less likely, and it’s darned secure as long as no one knows that password. For those same reasons, I like using Keychain Access better than password-protected documents, too. But this is certainly better than what a lot of people do, which is using Contacts’ Notes field to store very secret data. [From Mac Observer.]

5/ Disable autoplay in Safari — If you hate it when certain sites auto-play videos when you arrive at their site [it’s why I stopped using the otherwise excellent Macworld site], you can disable video autoplay using Terminal: quit Safari completely. That means clicking Safari from the top left of the menu bar, and then Quit. Once that’s done, launch Terminal from Applications -> Utilities. In Terminal, type the following commands:

defaults write com.apple.Safari WebKitMediaPlaybackAllowsInline -bool false
defaults write com.apple.Safari com.apple.Safari.ContentPageGroupIdentifier.WebKit2AllowsInlineMediaPlayback -bool false

— If you’re running the WebKit Technology Preview, you’ll also need to run these commands in Terminal:

defaults write com.apple.SafariTechnologyPreview WebKitMediaPlaybackAllowsInline -bool false
defaults write com.apple.SafariTechnologyPreview com.apple.Safari.ContentPageGroupIdentifier.WebKit2AllowsInlineMediaPlayback -bool false

That’s it. Start up Safari once again, and enjoy a life free of video autoplay.

Five Tip Friday ~ simple tips for macOS


1/ Change the default web browser in macOS Sierra — If you prefer another web browser to Safari (which I find excellent), you can change the macOS default. From the Apple () menu, choose System Preferences, then click General.
Choose your web browser from the ‘Default web browser’ pop-up menu.

2/ Set your default printer — If you have more than one printer, one thing you could do to make them slightly less annoying, though, is to choose which one to set as your default. If you print to a particular device way more often than another, it makes sense to always default to the last one you used when you choose File > Print.
Choose System Preferences from the Apple Menu at the top-left of your screen, and then click on Printers & Scanners.
You’ll see a list of your devices on the left, and you can pick which one you want as the default from the drop-down near the bottom of the window. Close the System Preferences window, and when you print something afterwards, your Mac will assume you want to use the device you set as the default.
You can click the drop-down show to temporarily switch to a different printer if you need to, but it will always revert back to the default for the next job.

3/ Move the cursor with your keyboard — If your mousing hand needs a break, or perhaps you need to move the mouse pointer one teeny-tiny pixel at a time, there’s a way to move the Mac mouse pointer with the keyboard rather than nudging the mouse or swiping your trackpad.
Turn on the Mac feature called Mouse Keys, which lets you move the Mac mouse pointer by tapping the keys on your numeric keypad or, if you don’t have a separate numeric keypad, by pressing a set of keys within the keyboard itself.
Open the Mac’s System Preferences by clicking the Apple menu in the top-left corner of the screen, select System Preferences. Click Accessibility, select Mouse & Trackpad in the left column, then check the Enable Mouse Keys checkbox. This lets you move your mouse pointer using a numeric trackpad: press the 8 key to nudge the Mac mouse up a tad. The 2 key will move the mouse down, while the 4 and 6 keys move the mouse left and right, respectively. The 7, 9, 1, and 3 keys move the Mac mouse up and to the left, up and to the right, down and to the left, and down and to the right. (There’s more on this at Here’s The Thing.)

4/ Force the Finder to restart in macOS Sierra — Represented by the blue icon with the smiling face, the macOS Sierra Finder is the home-base app for your Mac. You use it to organise and access almost everything on your Mac, including documents, images, movies, and any other files you have. However, sometimes you need to restart it if it’s acting up or if you’ve installed an app that requires a restart. To do so: in Finder, click the  menu and hold down the Shift key on your keyboard.
Click Force Quit Finder.
You can also hold down the ⌥ (option) key on your keyboard.
Click on the Finder icon in your Dock.
Choose Relaunch from the bottom of the pop-out list that appears.

5/ Search Google directly without even firing up a browser — You can use your Mac’s Spotlight to directly search using your default search engine. Type something in Spotlight that you want to search on Google, then, press Command (⌘) + B. It will open Safari with your search term…

Five tip Friday ~ The Calendar App and iCloud


1/ Edit appointment details using the Calendar Inspector in macOS Sierra — The Inspector window appears when you add a new event, or double-click on an existing event in the Calendar app in macOS Sierra, or click and event once and choose Command-e.
Inspector shows you all the details of your events, including who’s invited, and where and when you want the event to occur. Start typing an address and Calendar suggests matching locations. Start typing the name of a contact in your Address Book and Calendar suggests matching names based on contacts you’ve entered in the Contacts app.
You can even see your event locations on a miniature map in the Inspector. (If you click this mini map, the Maps app opens a full size view.)  The mini map includes an estimate of the travel time to your appointment destination from your current location in the event Inspector as well as the weather forecast for that day. (For travel time estimates, directions and weather, you need to turn on Location Services in System Preferences.)

2/ Use your iCloud account in macOS Sierra’s Calendar app — iCloud is included with macOS. Once you sign up for your free iCloud account, you can push calendar updates across your devices, share your iCloud Calendar, and see your calendar on the iCloud website.
If you have an iCloud account , you can use iCal to access and manage your iCloud calendars. If you set up the iCloud Calendar service on several devices and computers, your iCloud calendar and reminder information is kept up to date on each device and computer.
Set up your iCloud calendar account from System Preferences to see your iCloud-based calendars in the Calendar window. In the System Preferences app, click iCloud and sign in.
If this is your first time signing in from this computer, you’ll be asked if you want to use iCloud for contacts, calendars, and bookmarks. Make sure that the calendars option is selected (checked), then click Next.
If you’ve previously signed in to iCloud, you’ll see a list of iCloud services – select the check-box next to Calendars to have them sync.

3/ Add calendars to macOS Sierra’s Calendar from other services besides iCloud — You can use your iCloud account in macOS Sierra’s Calendar app to add an event, and this appears as if by magic on all your other Apple devices linked to that same Apple ID. But you can also add appointments from other popular services to your calendar in Calendar app, including Exchange, CalDAV, Facebook, and Yahoo:
Choose Apple Menu () > System Preferences.
Select Internet Accounts.
Click the Add Account (+) button at the bottom of the window.
Choose the account type you want to use, and enter your account credentials.
Make sure the option Calendars is selected (checked) to display the events associated with this account in the Calendar app. [These three Calendar tips came form the Apple World Today.]

4/ iCloud Drive and syncing iWork documents to your iOS devices — Those files aren’t necessarily being stored on your iPhone or iPad. Meaning that if you’re out and about, heading into a bad cell area may cause you to lose access to said files. Which is a bummer.
To check out what your situation, just open any of the iWork apps (Pages, Numbers, or Keynote) on your iOS device. When you do so, you’ll see a list of your documents of that type. If some of the files are in iCloud but aren’t downloaded, you’ll see a tiny cloud icon on those.
Of course, you can tap to download any one you’d like, but if what you really want is to keep all documents of that kind on your iPhone or iPad at all times, head over to your Settings. Scroll down until you see the section for the app you’d like to download stuff for and tap it.
Within that, look for the “On-Demand Downloads” toggle.
Turn that OFF, and everything you’ve got within that app will download so you can keep all your documents on your iPhone. This is great if you’re going on a trip and don’t want to use cellular data, for example, or if you just know you always need access to your spreadsheets. But be careful—I strongly suggest that you go into the app in question and make certain that the process has completed before you hit the road. You might even want to turn on Airplane Mode for the device and try to open a file or two. Paranoid? Heck, that’s just who I am. Almost a decade of tech support has traumatized taught me well.

5/ iSee the status of uploads in iCloud Drive — While we’re messing with iCloud,  you can turn on Finder’s Status Bar, the option for which is under the View menu click on the iCloud Drive option in Finder’s sidebar (shown above), and suddenly you’ll get a lot more information about your uploads.
Also turn the Path Bar on (View > Show Path Bar, shown below). This is helpful if you’d like to have a trail of breadcrumbs, so to speak, leading back within the folder structure you’ve navigated through – this appears at the bottom of folder windows. Any of the location icons in the Path Bar are double-clickable, as well, to return you to someplace you’ve been. Useful if you tend to drill way deep down into folders and then forget where you came from! Not that I ever do that myself, oh no.

Five Tip Friday ~ Tidiness tips for macOS


1/ Minimise apps into their icons — You can click the yellow pill button in the upper left corner of a window to minimize an app’s window into the Dock in macOS Sierra, but if you minimize a lot of windows, the right side of the Dock quickly becomes cluttered.
The solution is to minimise windows into their app icons.
Open System Preferences from the Apple menu and choose Dock. Check the box next to ‘Minimize windows into application icon’ (shown above). Now they minimise down into the originating app’s icon – click-and-hold on that in the Dock to see your files (below).


If you have a lot of minimized app windows, and have trouble finding what you’re looking for, control-click (hold down the Control key on your keyboard and click) the app icon to reveal a list of that apps minimized windows. Choose an item from the list and it will open.

2/ Group windows by application in macOS Sierra — macOS Sierra introduced system wide tabs for most (but not all) apps, allowing you to merge multiple windows into a single window or separate merged windows.
With two or more windows of a supported app open, go to the Windows menu in the Finder and choose ‘Merge All Windows.’ All windows of the same app will be grouped into a single window. Each file you have open will appear as a tab inside the single window.
To separate the merged windows into standalone windows of their own, select the merged window to make it active. Go to the Windows and click the ‘Move Tab to New Window’ option. Click it to move the selected tab to a separate window.
This won’t separate all tabs into windows of their own, but separate the current tab to its own window. All remaining tabs will remain grouped into a single window unless you separate them one at a time.
Click the close button on a merged window, and it will close all tabs you have open in it.

3/ Move multiple Events between Calendars — If you’ve got several events you need to move to a different calendar, change to month view by pressing Command-3 or click on the Month option in Calendar’s toolbar or at top-centre of Calendar.
Now find the events you’d like to move, hold down Command on your keyboard and click on each one to select them all in turn.
When your events are all highlighted, right- or Control-click on any one of them. From the contextual menu that appears, choose the ‘Calendar’ option and pick the one you’d like to move your selected events to. Simple.

4/ Multiple ways to move items to Trash — Trash is a To put item(s) in the Trash, once can simply drag the item(s) to the Trash icon, or move highlighted file(s) to the Trash using the keyboard combo Command-Delete. If you realize you made a mistake, you can Undo the operation by choosing File > Undo, or the keyboard combo Command-Z.
If you’d like to delete highlighted items immediately, you can hold down Option and select File > Delete Immediately…. Alternately, you can use keyboard combo Command-Option-Delete. Either way, you’ll received a confirmation dialogue that the operation is permanent and can’t be undone.

5/ Empty stubborn Trash items — ToIf there are files in the Trash, which you can confirm visually because you’ll see items in the Trash, you can empty it by either choosing Finder > Empty Trash…, or using keyboard combo Shift-Cmd-Delete. You’ll be presented with a confirmation dialog asking if you’re sure. You can also hold down Option and select Finder > Empty Trash, or use keyboard combo Shift-Option-Command-Delete. Notice that since there isn’t a trailing ellipsis after the choice, it will be done immediately without a confirmation dialogue. [If this still doesnt work, you need Terminal, as detailed here.]

Five Tip Friday ~ macOS Safari


quikws

1/ Quick website search in macOS Sierra’s Safari — In macOS Sierra’s Safari, you can enable Quick Website Search thanks to many websites offering their own integrated engine for searching within sites.
Safari provides shortcuts to these searches in some cases, allowing you to search said sites directly from the Smart Search Field. To see which sites your Safari installation currently supports for this feature, click on the Manage Websites button.
However, some sites don’t support this feature. Open Safari’s preferences from the Safari menu, then Search > Quick Website Search > Manage Website. From here, you can list which sites to exclude.

2/ Managing tabs — In Safari, you can create and open multiple tabbed windows so you can load more than one search result at a time, for example, or load a link alongside the link you are currently looking at. You can rearrange how they’re ordered, close them, or save a group of tabs as a bookmark that you can reopen all at once.
To add a new tab, press Command+T or click the plus sign at the far right of the Tab bar, or click a link with the scrollwheel if you have a scroll wheel mouse (yes, it clicks as well asa scrolls), or hold down the Control key on your keyboard, click a link on a page and choose Open In New Tab from the pop-out menu that appears .
To close a tab, move your cursor over the tab above the main web page window, and click the little X that appears on the left.

3/ To jump from tab to tab — Press Command+Shift+→ (right arrow) or Command+Shift+<– (left arrow – these keys are at bottom right of all Mac keyboards.

4/ Rearrange tabs — You can drag and drop a tab to the left or right of another tab to rearrange their order.
To move a tab to a new window. drag it underneath the Tab bar, then let go of your mouse button. Or you can right-click a tab and choose Move Tab to New Window.

5/ Save tabs as bookmarks — You can save every open tabbed window as a bookmark. Right-click any tab (or hold down that Control key and normal-click; or click the Bookmarks menu) and choose Add Bookmark for These Tabs.
You can also save the articles of every currently loaded tabbed window in the Reading List. Right-click any tab (or click the Bookmarks menu) and choose Add These Tabs to Reading List.

pin

Extra: Pin and Unpin tabs — Pinning a website puts the site’s icon in the top left section of the Tab bar (indicated above), allowing you to pull up the site with a click.
Pinned tabs are persistent across all Safari windows, even when you quit the web browser. Pinned tabs sync content across windows, including video. If you right click on a pinned tab, you can close all unpinned tabs. Here’s how to pin a tab: from the View menu, select Show Tab Bar.
Navigate to one of your favourite web sites, such as (ahem) AppleWorld.Today.
Right-click or control-click the tab bar, and select Pin Tab from the pop-up menu that appears. The current web site will be added to the pinned list, which is located at the far left edge of the tab bar.
To remove a pinned web site, make sure the tab bar is visible and right-click or command-click in the pin for the web site you wish to remove.
Select Unpin Tab from the pop-up menu.

Back to uni promotion, spaceship detail, Mac app bundle, Duplicate Finder and Remover


unicredit

Apple launches its Back to School promos for New Zealand — Apple is launching its annual Back to School promotion on Macs and iPads this week in New Zealand and Australia. The Back to Uni promotion runs through March 16.
In New Zealand, a qualified Mac purchase includes a NZ$105 Apple Store Gift Card and a qualified iPad purchase includes a NZ$75 Apple Store Gift Card. In Australia, Mac purchases include a A$100 Apple Store Gift Card and iPad purchases come with a A$70 Apple Store Gift Card.
Apple also introduced a similar promotion in Japan, offering students an ¥8,500 Apple Store gift card with the purchase of a new Mac and ¥5,500 Apple Store gift card with the purchase of any new iPad Pro.

Apple’s ‘spaceship campus’ has ‘astonishing attention to detail’ —Apple’s “spaceship campus” is a “futuristic campus built with astonishing attention to detail,” according to Reuters. The price tag for the project is estimated at $5 billion with more than $1 billion allocated for the interior of the building alone (Apple hasn’t confirmed these figures).

Pay what you want for the 2017 Superstar Mac Bundle — MacObserver has a new pay-what-you-want deal for you called the 2017 Superstar Mac Bundle. It includes 12 different apps—you get all of them by beating the average price, which is US$12.17 as of this writing. But you can pay anything—as little as a dollar—and get two of the apps, Mac Screen Recorder and NotePlan. Beat the leader’s price and get an entry into a giveaway for a 13″ MacBook Pro with Touch Bar. The full price for everything would be US$387.

Free Duplicate File Finder & Remover — This is a handy app that scans your Mac for all kinds of duplicates and does this really fast. It also features flexible auto-selection rules, so you won’t need to sort through your duplicates manually.
Duplicate File Finder & Remover is free on the Mac App Store. It produces accurate results in seconds on drives of any size and is extremely capable at comparing the contents of the cloud storages, so every user can save on pricey cloud space.

Five Tip Friday ~ macOS tips for viewing files instantly, Smart Folders and Safari


qlranger

1/ Use Quick Look in macOS Sierra — Use Quick Look in macOS Sierra (and previous versions of macOS) to view photos, files, movies, sound files, PDFs, even Word files when you don’t have Word, without opening them – the view is in full resolution. You can use Quick Look for items in Finder windows, on your desktop, in emails, in messages, and other places. Select one or more items, then press the Spacebar on your keyboard or, with later apple trackpads, force-click items. A Quick Look window opens. If you selected multiple items, the first item is shown. You can manually enlarge the window by dragging its corners, click the Full Screen green button at top left, and to return to the previous size, click the Exit Full Screen button (that green button again).
To see the next or previous item, click the arrows on the left, or press the Left and Right arrow keys. In full screen, you can click Play to view multiple items as a slideshow.
To see the items in an index sheet view, click the Sheet View button on the left, or press Command-Return.
You can also open the file with its parent Application, which is listed at top right, to actually edit the file (in the example above, it’s the Preview app) and click the Share button on the right.
When you’re done, close the Quick Look window by pressing the Spacebar or force-clicking again, or click the Close button (red button at top left of the window).

2/ Play the video portion of a Live Photo — When you open a Live Photo (which you can only take with iPhone 6s or 7) in the Quick Look window, the video portion of the photo plays automatically. To view it again, click Live Photo in the bottom-left corner of the photo.

smartsfol

3/ Create and modify a Smart Folder — Smart Folders automatically gather files by type and subject matter. They’re updated as you change, add, and remove files on your Mac.
In the Finder, choose File>New Smart Folder. To search for files, enter a topic, a phrase, or another parameter in the search field.
To determine whether the search should include only the names of files or their entire contents, choose ‘Name matches’ in the search suggestions that appear below the search field, then click Name, then choose either Filename or Everything.
To search for additional specific attributes, click the Add buttonbelow the search field, then make choices using the search attribute pop-up menus that appear.
The menus work in pairs; for example, to search for images, you choose Kind from the pop-up menu on the left, then choose Images from the pop-up menu next to it.
Click Save, then specify a name and location for your Smart Folder.
If you don’t want your Smart Folder to be in the sidebar, deselect Add To Sidebar.
You can’t use certain characters, including punctuation such as a colon (:), in folder names. If an error message appears, try using another name.
To change the criteria for a Smart Folder, open the Smart Folder. Begin typing in the folder’s search field, or click the Action pop-up menu , then choose Show Search Criteria.

4/ History in Safari — Want to see the sites you were looking at on your Mac yesterday? Easy. From the History menu, you can choose Earlier Today, or any of the six days preceding that.
Of course, this poses a security concern: anyone else can do the same thing on your Mac if it’s unlocked, to see where you were and to open any of those links – you’re bank account, for example, and if you let this automatically log in (a very bad idea), then you’re really asking for trouble. When you select the Clear History item at the bottom of the History menu, you get to choose just to delete the last hour’s sites, Today, Today and Yesterday or All. Be warned that any logins and auto-logins you went to will also be ‘forgotten’ and you will have to enter your details and/or auto- log in again.

selectdelete

5/ Selectively delete history items — I had never realised you can much more selectively delete history items. When you choose Show All History, which is the very top item in the History menu, you get to click on any one item (or hold down the Command key on your keyboard to select several items) to highlight individual sites and press the Delete key on your keyboard.
You can clear everything with the Clear History …’ button and even search for that distant item.
Double-clicking on any line launches the site, which can also be very handy.

Five Tip Friday ~ macOS Finder view tips


1/ Set the view in the macOS Sierra Finder — The Finder in macOS Sierra offers four ways to view items in a window: List, Columns, Cover Flow and Icon. To choose a view, click your preferred View button at top-left of any Finder window.
In Icon view, each file or folder is represented by an icon (such as the Mac desktop). List view shows details about a file or folder, including its attributes.
Column view provides a visual trail of where you’ve been, and displays a hierarchical view of where a file is stored. Cover Flow is a modified list view that displays a thumbnail view of a file’s contents, which is great for folders of photographs, for example.

finderbuttons

2/ Didn’t know what those buttons were? Turn on the descriptions for them. With a Finder window on the desktop, hold down the Control key on your keyboard and click in the grey area at the top of the Finder window just to the left or right of the folders file name at op centre. From the pop-out that appears, choose Icon and Text, and all your buttons get labels (it’s worth trying this in other apps like Apple Mail and Preview).
Choosing ‘Customize Toolbar’ [sic, and shown above] lets you even select which icons appear in the top area of Finder windows at all, and also get rid of any you don’t require.

3/ More view customisation — There are additional ways to customise how your items are displayed: sort items, arrange icons, and resize columns. Settings for sorting and arranging items in a folder apply until you change them. For example, if you sort your Documents folder by Date Added, the next time you view your Documents folder, it will also be sorted by Date Added.
To sort items in any view, from the View menu in Finder select Show View Options. Now click the Sort By pop-up menu and choose the sort order: Date Modified, Name etc.
In List view and Cover Flow, move the pointer over the column name you want to sort by, then click it. Click the column name again to reverse the sort order.

4/ Arrange — To arrange items in Finder windows in any view, click the Item Arrangement button, then choose an option, such as Date Created or Size.
When arranging by name, you can keep folders (in alphabetical order) at the top of the list. Choose Finder>Preferences, click Advanced, then select the “Keep folders on top when sorting by name” checkbox.

5/ Resize columns — In List view, Column view, and Cover Flow, drag the hairline divider between the column headings at the top of the window, i.e. between Name and Date Modified.
To expand a column to show all filenames in their entirety, double-click the column divider.
Control-click (hold down the Control key on your keyboard and click) any column to view all columns available. Choose a column name to display or hide it (visible columns have a checkmark next to their name).

More — You can change the text size of file names and, in some views, change the size of file icons. Open a Finder window, select the folder you want to change, then click a View button: Icon, List, Column, or Cover Flow.
Have the folder always open in this view by selecting the ‘Always open in’ checkbox to set specific preferences for specific folders. To have subfolders also open in this view, select the ‘Browse in’ checkbox.
showviewIf a subfolder opens in a different view, select the subfolder, choose View>Show View Options, then deselect the ‘Always open in’ and ‘Browse in’ checkboxes. The checkboxes must be selected for the main folder and deselected for the subfolder.
You can change the icon size, grid spacing, text size, and more by choosing the Select Icon view options.
[These tips came from Apple World Today.]

MagBytes 83 for January 2017


mb83The Swiss have arrived so seize the carp! OK, I’m not very good at French and Latin, but MagBytes 83 is here, full of news, views, tips and tricks for all Apple users, free and bulging with info in electronic form.

That’s just a thumbnail at left, so click …

THIS LINK —> issue83jan17 to get this PDF magazine on your device and/or computer.

Five Tip Friday ~ x2: 5 for macOS and 5 for iOS


I inexplicably failed to post five tips last week, for which I apologise – so here are 10 tips, 5 each for Mac and iOS.

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1/ Open folders in new Finder tabs or windows in macOS Sierra — When you open a folder in the Finder (the default application for browsing your Mac’s files), the folder’s contents usually replace the current contents of the window. However, you can open a folder in a new tab or window, if you wish. Open System Preferences (from its icon in the Dock or from the Apple Menu), then click Dock.
Click the “Prefer tabs when opening documents” pop-up menu, then choose your option: Always, In Full Screen Only, or Manually. By default, documents open in tabs only when an app is full screen.

2/ Open folders in tabs or windows — Hold down the Command key on your keyboard while you double-click a folder and it opens in a new tab or window, depending on your Finder preferences. (If the Finder toolbar and sidebar are hidden, double-clicking a folder without pressing the Command key opens the folder in a new window.)
To open a new Finder window without opening a specific folder, choose File > New Finder Window or press Command-N. [From Apple World Today.]

spring13/ Spring-loaded folders — macOS Sierra, as with several previous versions of macOS, supports ‘spring-loaded folders’. These pop open when you drag something onto it while holding down the mouse/trackpad button. Spring-loaded folders work with all folder or disk icons in all views and even in the Sidebar.
Select an icon (not a disk icon) and drag the selected icon onto any folder or disk icon while holding down the mouse/trackpad button. The highlighted folder or disk will flash twice (very quickly), then spring open under the cursor. (You can press the spacebar to make the folder open immediately.) Subfolders wishing this first folder continue to pop open until you release the mouse button. when you release the mouse button, the icon you’ve been dragging is dropped into the active folder. That window remains open; however, while all other windows you traversed close automatically.
To cancel a spring-loaded folder, drag the cursor away from the folder icon or outside the boundaries of the sprung window. The folder pops shut.
You can toggle spring-loaded folders on or off by going to System Preferences > Accessibility > Mouse & Trackpad. (There’s also a setting for how long the Finder waits before it springs the folders open.) [Also from Apple World Today.]

grab4/ Taking timed screenshots — Hopefully you know the standard Mac screenshot commands (Command-Shift 3 for the whole screen, Command-Shift 4 to select an area with a crosshair). But Apple includes an application (program) in your Applications folder, then in turn in the Utilities folder, that can take them at timed intervals. Open Applications and launch Grab.
When Grab launches, it just waits there with its menus for you to do something. To take a timed screenshot, pick that option from the Capture menu or press Shift-Command-Z. A dialogue box will appear to tell you what’s what. Click Start Timer and as the dialogue box notes, you’ll have ten seconds to set up your screenshot. (If you find that Grab isn’t including your cursor and you’d like it to, select that option within Grab > Preferences and choose one of the cursors there to include it in your next timed screenshot, or if you would prefer no cursor to show up, choose the blank option at the upper-left.
After the screenshot is taken, you can save it out of Grab at its full size.

5/ Maybe a little obscure for some, but you can disable LinkedIn birthdays in macOS Sierra Calendar — There’s a Birthdays calendar under the Other category in macOS Calendar. Uncheck or delete that one, as it’s one LinkedIn uses. You can also disable LinkedIn in your Contacts’ Preferences > Accounts category.

Now, five for iOS:

1/ Enable Siri for third-party apps in iOS 10 — For third-party apps, Siri support is off by default, and has to be manually toggled on app-by-app for titles that support the technology. There aren’t many that do support Siri so far, but for those that do, open the Settings app from the iOS home screen, then scroll down to the Siri menu option. The next step is to tap on the vague App Support option.
To use Siri once you’ve turned it on for any supported apps, you have to mention an app by name. Saying “find men’s fashion pins on Pinterest” will generate results, for example, while saying “find men’s fashion pins” will not only fail to open Pinterest, but potentially create wacky consequences as Siri tries to interpret what you mean.

2/ Create your own live wallpapers with iPhone 6-7 — First, take a Live Photo by tapping the little circle icon at top centre above the viewfinder screen in the Camera app on any iPhone that supports 3D Touch.
In the app, select the photo you’d like to turn into a Live wallpaper.
Centre the image to your liking, then tap Next.
3D Touch the screen by pressing down in order to get a preview of the wallpaper.
Tap the wand icon in the lower left corner to choose between the animation effects.
Tap Save to export it to your Camera Roll.
Once the photo has been saved, go to Settings > Wallpaper > Choose a new wallpaper to find it (note that this is where you can set any image you took as a Wallpaper, for the Home and/or Lock screen). Note Live Wallpapers will only work on iPhone 6s or later – as long as your iPhone supports 3D Touch, this will work for you.
(An app called LivePapers can turn any photo into a Live Photo. It’s NZ$2.49/US$1.99 in the App Store. It lets you turn any still photo into a Live Photo, which you can then set as a wallpaper on supported iPhones.)

3/ Change the default search engine in iOS Safari — Most iOS users are blissfully unaware of the fact they can easily change the default search engine that’s used by the Safari browser on the iPhone, iPad and iPod touch. While the default engine is still Google, it’s also possible to change to Bing, Yahoo, or even DuckDuckGo. Here’s how to do it.
Launch the Settings app and scroll down to Safari (it’s near the bottom of the list of Apple pre-installed apps), tap on it, and the top item on the screen that’s displayed is Search Engine (see image below).
Now tap on the search engine you’d like to make your default (see image below). Now when you enter search text into the search/address field at the top of the Safari screen, the results that are returned are from the new search engine.

4/ Search in secret — As above, you can choose a search engine that doesn’t track and record your searches, say if you’re using a work phone or you simply don’t want to leave a trace. As above, just choose DuckDuckGo … it may not be as comprehensive with results as Google.

5/ Speed searches by turning off Safari Suggestions — Because the suggestion may take a split second longer to load than the search results below it, you may inadvertently hit the suggestion instead of the term you wanted. There is a really quick way to fix this, though, so let’s pop over to Settings and check it out, shall we? It’s under the Safari preferences.
Toggle off Safari Suggestions there, and now your search results will now not try to do anything fancy or extra.