Tag Archives: Five Tip Friday

Five Tip Friday ~ Five for iOS


1/ Print to PDF from any app from iPhone and iPad — This trick relies upon a hidden feature of the Share Sheet. To print from any app, such as Safari, you begin by tapping the Share icon. Next, tap the Print icon from the bottom row of the Share Sheet. Depending on what you’ve enabled, you might have to scroll to the right to find it. Now, to access the PDF view, simply 3D Touch (or pinch together two fingers to zoom out, in no0n-3D Touch devices) in the preview area of the PDF.
With that done, you should be in a PDF view of your document, web page, or whatever. Your next step is to share it. Just tap the Share icon, and choose where you want to send your PDF. You can share it via Messages or Mail, or any other app that supports the Share Sheet extensions.

Another great option is iBooks, if you want to keep all of your PDFs together, but there’s often a Share Sheet icon there to do that directly. But you can even save the PDF file to your iCloud drive or Dropbox.
Saving the web pages you’ve visited to PDF is a great way to keep notes when you’re researching. Other options for where to save those PDF files include Evernote and even the built-in Notes app.

2/ Use the Remote app to control your iTunes library in macOS Sierra with your iDevice — If you have an iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch you can use the Apple Remote app — free from the Apple App Store — to control your Mac’s iTunes library from a distance.
First, pair the app with the iTunes library (or libraries) you want to control. Your device and your computer must be on the same wireless network.
If you have Remote 2.0 (or later) and Home Sharing is turned on, you can set Remote to pair automatically with any of the iTunes libraries on your Home Sharing network. You can also pair Remote directly with iTunes libraries that aren’t in your Home Sharing network. To pair the Remote with an iTunes library: Tap Remote on your device’s Home screen.
Tap Add an iTunes Library.
A 4-digit code appears.
Open iTunes on your computer and click the Remote button .
Type the 4-digit code in the iTunes window.
iTunes pairs the library on your computer with the Remote app on your device.
Pair Remote with your Home Sharing network.
To use Remote 2.0 (or later) with Home Sharing, every iTunes library you want to control must have Home Sharing turned on.
Tap Remote on your device’s Home screen.
Tap Settings.
Tap to turn Home Sharing on.
Type your Apple ID and password, and tap Done.
Tap the iTunes library or Apple TV you want to control.

3/ Use Home Sharing to import items from another iTunes library — You can use Home Sharing to import items from up to five iTunes libraries on other computers on your home network? You can (assuming you have an Apple ID).
When you use your Mac on your Home Sharing network to download an item from the iTunes Store, you can have the item download automatically to other computers on your Home Sharing network.
Turn on Home Sharing. Choose File > Home Sharing > Turn On Home Sharing.
Type in your Apple ID and password, and click Turn On Home Sharing.
If you don’t have an Apple ID, click “Don’t have an Apple ID?” and follow the onscreen instructions.
To import items from other libraries using Home Sharing, choose a computer on your Home Sharing network from the Library pop-up menu. The library loads and a list of categories appears.
Choose a category (Music, for example). In the Show menu at the bottom of the iTunes window, choose “Items not in my library.” Select the items you want to import, and click Import.
To automatically import new iTunes Stores purchases from another computer, choose a computer on your Home Sharing network from the Library pop-up menu. Choose a category (Music, for example).
Click Settings at the bottom of the window. In the window that appears, select “Automatically transfer new purchases from Library Name.” Select the types of items you want to import. Click OK.
To turn off Home Sharing, on each computer, choose File > Home Sharing > Turn Off Home Sharing. If a shared computer doesn’t appear when Home Sharing is on, turn Home Sharing off, and then turn it on again.

4/ Disable homescreen rotation on Apple’s Plus-series iPhones — By default, Apple’s iPhone 6 Plus, 6s Plus, and 7 Plus add an auto-rotating home screen to iOS, rearranging icons and the dock whenever a device is tilted sideways.
Aside from the Control Center orientation lock, here’s an indirect way of achieving the same result:
Within the Settings app, tap on Display & Brightness, then on “View” under the Display Zoomcategory towards the very bottom. Nominally this option just makes it easier to browse and tap on icons. As a consequence of using it, however, the home screen will no longer rotate.
To make the switch, tap on ‘Zoomed,’ then on ‘Set.’ Technically an iPhone has to reset to apply the change, but unlike a normal reboot this should only take several seconds.
That’s it — to reverse course, go back to the Display Zoom menu and select ‘Standard’ instead. The above method works in iOS 9 and 10.
Note that at least some apps, like Apple Messages, will continue to rotate their own interfaces even with Display Zoom on, and there may be no way of disabling this within an app’s settings. [From AppleInsider.]

5/ Using 3D Touch — If you have iPhone 6s or later, you may not be using 3D Touch, a more pressured press on the screen that releases a wealth of extra possibilities, for example when you are typing:
The first time you 3D Touch anywhere on the keyboard, you can start dragging the cursor around to place it in a specific spot. It’s a great way to get exact placement without fidgeting with your finger.
But, if you don’t lift your finger after that first 3D Touch and do it again, you’ll select the adjacent full word. 3D Touch one more time without lifting, and you’ll select the entire sentence surrounding the cursor. These extra actions take a little practice, but they’re darn handy once you get them down. [Here are a whole lot more handy 3D Touch features, from the Mac Observer.]

 

Five Tip Friday ~ Sharing locations, closing all apps, Safari reader and DNS in iOS


1/ Share your location quickly from the Maps app — It’s pretty quick to share your location in Messages, but sometimes you’re in the Maps app when you suddenly think ‘it would be great to tell so-n-so this is where I am, or will be…’ and to be able to do this via other apps like Mail, as well.
Luckily, this is possible.
In the Maps app, navigate to the location you want to pin and share. Tap and hold on that location until the round red pin flag appears (shown at left).
To fine-tune the location, tap on Edit Location – now you can drag the map around until the pin is exactly where you want it.
Anyway, once you’ve got it where you want it, tap Done to go back to the main map screen.)
Now tap the Share button (marked above, at lower right) to send out the pin location to whoever you want, via Messages, Mail, Twitter, Facebook, or with any other app with its Sharing Sheet extension turned on.

2/ Share your GPS coordinates — To get really geeky, you can also share your precise geographical coordinates. Open up the Compass app and wait a few seconds. Your latitude and longitude should appear at the bottom of the screen. Tap and hold on the coordinates, and then choose Copy: you can now paste your coordinates into a text message, email or anywhere else.

After you double-click your Home button, you can swipe left and right through running apps to quickly change to another (tap on the one you want) or swipe upwards to ‘quit’ them (stop them using your iDevice’s resources, RAM, data etc)

3/ Close all running apps in one hit — This is contentious with some claiming it’s not necessary. But I’m firmly in the camp that having dozens of apps running at once makes your iDevice laggy, since apps don’t automatically quit when you can’t see them on iPhone/iPad. In other words, having an app running, then pressing the Home button to launch another app, actually leaves that first app running until you can have dozens of apps all running at once – you can see this by double-clicking the Home button, from which view you can swipe apps upwards to actually quit them, or swipe left and right to go through them and tap the ones you want to work or play in again.
But the following process suspends all your apps, freeing up memory and processor time:
• Press the Sleep/Wake button until you see the slider to shut down your iPhone.
• Now press and hold the Home Button for approximately five seconds, or until you are returned to either your Lock or Home Screen…
That’s it, your apps have all been suspended. If you double-press the Home Button, you’ll still see each of them still listed as if they are running, and they’re still instantly available form this view, but you might notice these apps actually refresh (or relaunch) when you tap on them. That’s because they’ve actually been properly suspended, freeing up memory.

4/ Shared Links in iOS Safari — Shared Links is a tab that’s been around since iOS 7, but was used to just support Twitter accounts. Now the feature also supports RSS feeds. To get to the shared links, tap on the Bookmarks button at the bottom row of Safari. Next, tap on the tab with the “@” sign, and you’ll be in your Shared Links. One of the first feeds that will show up in Shared Links, if you have signed into the social media network in the Settings app, is your Twitter timeline. Long-hold on that Bookmarks button, and a new menu pops up with Add Bookmark, Add to Reading List and Add to Shared Links. Tap on that last one, and voilà, the RSS feed for the page you’re looking shows up.
If Add to Shared Links doesn’t appear, try going to an article on that site instead of the home page. The Shared Links option will often appear then.

5/ Easily change your DNS — This won’t apply to most people, but it’s possible to change your DNS address to access more online than your typical ISP might allow. DNS stands for Domain Name System, the type of system used to name any device or service connected to the internet. It translates numerical IP addresses to more human-friendly names (ie, to http://www.mac-nz.com). Your browser requests are sent to a DNS server controlled by a third party – usually this would be your ISP. But it’s possible for your ISP to know which websites you visit, but also censor websites it doesn’t like. Thankfully, there are DNS services that are committed to privacy and defeating censorship. Assuming you know some of these like OpenNicProject: you will need the DNS addresses: a series of numbers separated by full stops.
Open the Settings app on your iOS device and navigate to Wi-Fi and find the network you’re connected to. Tap the blue “i” to the right of it. This is where you see the network settings.
Look for the section called DNS. You can tap on the empty space, and type in the DNS primary and secondary server. Type in the primary address first, followed by a comma (no space), then the secondary server address.

Five Tip Friday ~ Restore a copy, powerful Photos search, recording FaceTime calls, accented letters


MagBytes 85 came out yesterday (click on MagByes Newsletter over there -> on the right to download the last few copies) with the last month of Five Tip Fridays and lots ore info, all for free, but here are five more.

1/ Using macOS: Using Restore a Copy — Pages, Numbers, and Preview and some other apps are actually tracing your steps as you work. Every time you choose File>Save or press Command-S when you’re working on a document, the app saves a version of your file, which you can then revert to if you find you don’t like the changes you’ve made. But by default, reverting replaces the file you’re working on, which isn’t always the best thing.
Once you have saved a document several times, you can go back to the different save points by using the menu option File > Revert To.
Now you can either choose the last opened version to restore if that choice is available, or select Browse All Versions which will take you to a Time Machine–like interface and show you every available file version (below).

When you find what you want, clicking Restore overwrites the existing file you’ve got open, as I mentioned, and it won’t warn you before that happens. But it’s good to know you can visit this restore mode again if you accidentally lose your existing file.

2/ If you need to do is bring back a version without replacing your current one — Hold down the Option key within this view, and Restore switches to Restore a Copy.
Pick that instead, and a new file will open, which you can then save if you want. Neat. [This is another great tip from Melissa Holt.)

3/ Apple added powerful machine learning to Photos in macOS Sierra — To start searching in the Photos app, just click in the search bar in the top right corner of the app and start typing. If you want to find pictures of your dog, for example, type ‘dog’. The app is now able to identify any photos with dogs in them. Photos will search file names for the word ‘dog’, but will also try and find images of dogs that don’t have the word ‘dog’ appended to them!
You can also search for particular faces, places and other things. You can use quite a few different search terms, but items, descriptions, objects, places and people are the best terms to use. The app is much smarter than you might think, so play around with it and see what you can find. (Note that Photos only searches within your photo library; it won’t find images that are saved elsewhere on your Mac. This also won’t work in a Spotlight search; the feature is limited to use within the Photos app itself.)

4/ Record a FaceTime call on macOS Sierra — It’s not that easy to record a Skype call (and recording any call requires permission of the other party in New Zealand law, please note, unless you represent the law anyway), but you can record FaceTime calls relatively easily with this workaround.
Open QuickTime on your Mac (it’s in the Applications folder if it’s not in your Dock – Finder>Go menu>Applications) or use the macOS LaunchPad (whatever method is fine).
Click File in the Menu bar.
Click New Screen Recording.
Click the arrow next to the record button in the QuickTime window.
Choose Internal Microphone from the list of available microphones.
Open FaceTime. Its icon should be in the Dock. If not, it’s in the Applications folder. Or you can use the macOS LaunchPad. Or tell Siri to “Open FaceTime.”
Click the record button in QuickTime.
Click the screen to record your whole screen, or click and drag over the FaceTime window to only record FaceTime.
Begin your FaceTime call.
When the call is over, click the Stop Recording button in QuickTime.
Click File in the Menu bar.
Select Save.
Name your recording, and select where you wish to store it.
Click Save. [I haven’t tried this with Skype but it might work too.]

5/ Accented letters — If you want to type ‘ō,’ hold down the letter ‘o’ on your keyboard for a couple of seconds. A menu pops out above your cursor with the available options for that character. Choose the right one with your mouse/trackpad, or simply press the grey number listed under the correct accented letter (above). This works for any letter, btw, (u, e etc) that can be accented.
This is the easiest way, but there are other ways, too

Five Tip Friday ~ smarter Sends from Mail, Do Not Disturb, folders for Notes, text selection


1/ Automatically select best account to send from in Mac Mail — Apple Mail received a new feature in Sierra that automatically chooses the best account for you to send a new message from, based on who your email is addressed to and what mailbox and message you had selected when you started composing.
To turn this on (or off) open Mail’s Preferences from the menus at the top. Use the Composing Tab in Mail Preferences to access your settings for sending messages. Under the Composing tab, you’ll see a drop-down next to “Send new messages from.” Pick that to view your options.
You might almost always want to send from your work email address, but if you want to try out letting Apple Mail pick for you, then toggle that drop-down to “Automatically select best account.”

2/ Enable Do Not Disturb in macOS to silence notifications — Notifications can be a mixed blessing. For some they keep the chaos of communications down and allow for rapid response to an email or a Tweet, but for others they can be an annoying distraction.
You can silence notifications until midnight quickly, with a single click. To get that done, option-click (hold down the Option key on your keyboard while you click) on the Notifications icon in the upper-right hand corner of the desktop.
To show that Notifications are muted, the icon becomes greyed out. When the icon is greyed, you can still invoke the Notifications tray by clicking on the icon again — but this won’t un-mute them.
To do so, either pop open the Notifications tray and turn them back on with the toggle, or option-click on the Notifications icon in the menubar again.

3/ Who can and can’t bother you — If you want more precise control over what gets to bother you, delve into the settings of the feature itself.
Select System Preferences from the apple Menu (or from the Dock). In the upper right hand corner of the system preferences, select Notifications. From this menu, most parameters of Notification Center are set. Setting the schedule for notifications to not bother you at all during working hours is a good solution for the easily distracted.
There are other settings here, such as the ability to turn them off when the the display is being mirrored for a presentation, or to allow for a particularly persistent caller to break though your need to not be disturbed.
However, another option to quiet the tumult is to tell the most frequent offender to not pop up a notification. Select whatever app you wish to silence from the left hand column, and turn it off, or pare down when it will yell at you.

4/ Set folders in the Notes app — There aren’t a lot of ways to organize notes in Apple Notes, which became so much more powerful in Yosemite. But you can set folders and subfolders – clock the Elis icon at lower left in the Notes window to create a folder. There’s no obvious way to create a subfolder, but in fact all you do is drag one folder into another.
Keep in mind that if you delete a folder, then all of the subfolders and notes will also be deleted.
(Unfortunately, it’s not possible to create subfolders in iOS Notes.But if you create your subfolders on macOS, and do sync over to iOS.)

5/ Text selection tricks — Clicking anywhere within text in a document places your cursor there for deleting or adding to what you’ve written. While you can click and drag to select text, sometimes this means you miss a few letters. If you want to just select one word, it’s much faster to double-click it.
A triple-click selects the entire paragraph your cursor is on.
More sophisticated still: hold that final click and move your cursor – the selection jumps by full words or full paragraphs each time … no missing letters!

Five Tip Friday ~ Public Calendar, folder hierarchy, Safari tabs, Finder tabs


sharecal

1/ Configure a Public Calendar — Using iCloud, you can set up a public calendar. This is different from the typical iCloud calendar sharing in which all participants can usually edit and add events themselves. Depending on how you set the permissions, a public calendar will instead show anyone with its link all of its events but won’t allow them to make any changes. While this used to be only available to iCloud users, now PC users can also access these public calendars as long as they’ve got a program that supports iCalendar files (as Microsoft Outlook does).
Open the Calendar program on your Mac, then decide whether you’d like to use an existing calendar or create a new blank one. Keep in mind that anyone with the link will be able to view all of the events you add to this calendar, so if privacy’s a big concern, then I would start with a blank one to be sure you haven’t added anything in the past: File>New Calendar from the top menu. Name your creation within the sidebar and press the Return key to accept the name, then hold down the Control key on your keyboard and click on that calendar name in the sidebar to get the pop-out menu (shown above).
Click that, and you can set the calendar’s sharing.
Now you need to send the link that appears to the right of ‘URL’ to the people who might like to subscribe. You can do that by clicking that little Share Sheet icon to the right of the link, which gives you the usual choices for messaging or emailing that info, or you can just copy the link from that box and paste it in somewhere to send it.
hen your recipient clicks the link on a Mac, they will see something like ‘Allow Permission’. If permission is granted, Calendar will open and offer to subscribe to your Calendar. (There’s more about this at Mac Observer, although the writer may have been using an older version of Calendar as her prison are slightly different to the latest setup detailed above).

2/ See the hierarchy of your File Locations — Clicking on the name of a file may give you some options for what to do with it, depending on what program you’re in. However, you can also right-click, Control-click, or Command-click on title bar of a file in the Finder to see a hierarchical view of where that file lives. This works in tons of places around your Mac, too. When you’ve got that little box open, you can click any of the folders shown to jump right to it.
One place this is unexpectedly helpful is in Mail. If you’re one of those who double-clicks to open emails into their own windows, a simple Command- or Control-click of its subject at the top will reveal its full hierarchical location.
You can do this all around macOS, but Microsoft Office is an outlier. You can still see the same info using this trick in those applications, but not with a Command-click. Only a right- or Control-click will do.

3/ Mac Safari tabs — macOS has long had a keyboard shortcut for restoring Safari tabs. All you have to do is press the Command (⌘) key and while it’s held down, the Shift and while they’re both held down, the T key in old versions of OS X …but in macOS Sierra, you can hold down ⌘ + Shift, and press T multiple times to restore multiple tabs.

foltabs

4/ Folder tabs — If you’re happily using Safari tabs (and you really, really should be) why not do the same thing in the Finder? Each Mac folder window is capable of using a tabbed interface, perfect for juggling multiple open folders within the same window.  But because tabs generally don’t appear in a folder window unless you specifically add them, it’s easy to miss that Mac folders have tabs. Once you get used to them, though, you’ll love ’em.
If a folder contains any subfolders, right-click (of holed down the Control key and normal-click) on one of those subfolders, then select Open in New Tab.
When you do, a new folder tab will appear in your original folder window, just like a new browser tab would in Safari.
You can switch folder “views” (icon, list, columns, etc.) in one tab while keeping the folder views different in other tabs, and you can also navigate to a completely different folder within a tab.
Just drag a folder tab onto the desktop to turn it into its own window.
To re-arrange your tabs within a folder window, click and drag a tab, just as you would in a browser window.
To turn a tab into a separate window,  click a folder tab and drag it out onto the desktop; when you do, it’ll snap into its very own window.

5/ Use tabs to rearrange where files are — You can also drag files from one folder tab to another: click and hold a file in one folder tab and drag it onto the tab of another folder. When you do, the top of the second folder tab will flash briefly, and then the tab itself will open; once it does, just drop the file wherever you’d like it to go in the tab.

Five Tip Friday ~ Siri’s Batman Easter Egg, AirPods volume control, save emails into PDFs


batman

1/ Siri has a LEGO Batman Easter Egg — Once these hidden little gems proliferated through Apple stuff but steve Jobs banned them. But sometimes you find them, and they’re even more precious now that they’re so rare. Press-and-hold your iPhone’s Home button to activate Siri, and get your Batman on by saying ‘Hey, computer’  and Siri respond with bat-appropriate comments. Cool huh? (This also works on Siri for Mac.)

2/ AirPods volume control is via Siri — Telling Siri to “increase/decrease volume” will land users at the nearest default level —0, 13, 25, 38, 50, 63, 75, 88 and 100 percent.

3/ Add percentages — You can add percentages from 0 to 100 percent onto the back of volume control commands. Granular changes within two percentage points are hardly noticeable, but tweaks above three points are surprisingly distinct.
For those who want greater control, Siri lets users set audio output volumes by percentage.
First, invoke Siri with a double tap on an AirPod, or say Hey Siri or long-press your iPhone/iPad Home button. Now say, “Set volume at 53 percent” or “lower volume to 23 percent.” Apple’s virtual assistant is capable of understanding a number of command variations including “raise/lower volume,” “turn sound up/down,” and “increase/decrease volume,” among others.

4/ What percentage are you at? To discover current listening levels, users can ask Siri, “What percent is the volume?” or “what is the volume?”

5/ Print PDFs from emails — There is another hidden feature in iOS – this one lets you print-to-PDF with any email. This doesn’t require a third-party app or another email client: you can do it inside Apple Mail with 3D Touch. Open Apple Mail on your iDevice (iPhone and iPad). Open the email you want to save. Tap the Reply button and a menu pops up with three options: Reply, Forward – and Print. Tap Print.
You’ll now see a screen where you can select a physical printer over Wi-Fi. But if you 3D Touch the email (press harder on the screen, a feature added from iPhone 6s), this message it will ‘pop’ and add a Share button at bottom right which lets you Share the email to PDF. This works for single page emails and emails with multiple pages. It’s a great way to save email receipts or important emails from VIPs.

Five Tip Friday ~ iOS Photo markup, Portrait mode, zoom, 3D touch


markup

1/ Quickly mark up Photos on iPhone — The stock Photos app in iOS has a great tool for drawing perfect geometric figures on your photos. With Photos you can draw shapes freehand, and the software can determine what shape you are trying to draw and, at the lower part of the screen, offer two options: your original shape or what the photo app thinks you are trying to draw.
Access the markup options by tapping on the three lines with circles located at the bottom of the photo. Then tap on the circle with the three dots and choose Markup.
At the bottom there are options for colour selection, and below that four options: drawing a shape, lens magnification, overlaying text, and undo.
Choose the colour you want – the drawing tool should be selected and in blue. If not, tap on the drawing tool which looks like a marker drawing a line. Now draw the shape on the photo. If you draw a shape closely resembling something the app recognizes, then, at the bottom, you will be given two choices: your drawing or a well-defined shape the app thinks you are trying to draw.
If you tap on the box to the right, choosing the shape the app suggests, you will have a perfectly formed shape with handles to resize or shape it further. You can press on the shape and move it to place it somewhere different on the photo. When you are finished, simply tap on an open space on the photo. If you like what has been done with the photo, tap “done”; otherwise tap “cancel.”

2/ Portrait mode in iOS 10.1 on iPhone 7 Plus — iPhone 7 Plus can utilise its Portrait mode, creating an effect known as bokeh where the background behind a subject is blurred automatically. Officially it’s still in beta but you can get some pretty decent results out of it.
Swipe across the photo modes to Portrait, then frame your shot. Your iPhone will tell you if you need to move further away or find more light.
Keep your composition as simple as possible, with your subject (living or inanimate) as clearly defined as possible to avoid blurring the wrong thing. Experiment with exposure levels by tapping on the screen then dragging up or down on the sun icon. This will make things brighter or darker.

3/ Digital zoom — If your phone doesn’t have a second physical lens for zooming, digital zoom is an option too, but this is inferior since it just enlarges and crops the photo. If you do want to use it, tap and hold on the zoom button then drag left or right. Just don’t expect super sharp results.

4/ Get up close with optical zoom — Zooming in with optical zoom on the iPhone 7 Plus, which has two lenses, is easy: tap the 1x button above the shutter button and hey presto, you’re twice as close to your subject.
Keeping your phone steady is really important, but this model of iPhone is actually having its lens move so it’s a sharp, details zoom rather than the artificial result all the other iPhones get, as above.

5/ 3D touch shortcuts — Since iPhone 6s, pressing harder on your screen gives you extra commands and abilities (this does not work on iPhone 6 and any iPhone before that).
Here are some good ones to learn:
When downloading an app, you’ll see its icon appear as a timer on the home screen. To prioritise a download, and put it to the front of the queue of all the apps currently being installed, 3D Touch (i.e., press harder on) the icon and choose Prioritize Download.
One of the key uses for 3D Touch is to expand notifications and get more details without having to actually open them – if you do this on an Uber alert, you’ll get information on the driver’s current location, plus the option to send a message.
The iOS Control Center is packed with 3D Touch shortcuts just waiting to be discovered and used, including one for the Flashlight icon, which lets you choose between three different levels of intensity for the light: low, medium, and high.
Do a hard press anywhere on the iOS keyboard and it grays out, which means you can then move your finger to adjust the position of the cursor in the text.
A shortlist of contacts you frequently communicate with appears with a 3D Touch on the Phone app icon.
With a light tap on a link in Safari you can get a preview of the page without actually navigating there. It’s one of the “peek and pop” uses of 3D Touch.

Want more? Check out this Gizmodo story.

Five Tip Friday ~ macOS Finder view tips


1/ Set the view in the macOS Sierra Finder — The Finder in macOS Sierra offers four ways to view items in a window: List, Columns, Cover Flow and Icon. To choose a view, click your preferred View button at top-left of any Finder window.
In Icon view, each file or folder is represented by an icon (such as the Mac desktop). List view shows details about a file or folder, including its attributes.
Column view provides a visual trail of where you’ve been, and displays a hierarchical view of where a file is stored. Cover Flow is a modified list view that displays a thumbnail view of a file’s contents, which is great for folders of photographs, for example.

finderbuttons

2/ Didn’t know what those buttons were? Turn on the descriptions for them. With a Finder window on the desktop, hold down the Control key on your keyboard and click in the grey area at the top of the Finder window just to the left or right of the folders file name at op centre. From the pop-out that appears, choose Icon and Text, and all your buttons get labels (it’s worth trying this in other apps like Apple Mail and Preview).
Choosing ‘Customize Toolbar’ [sic, and shown above] lets you even select which icons appear in the top area of Finder windows at all, and also get rid of any you don’t require.

3/ More view customisation — There are additional ways to customise how your items are displayed: sort items, arrange icons, and resize columns. Settings for sorting and arranging items in a folder apply until you change them. For example, if you sort your Documents folder by Date Added, the next time you view your Documents folder, it will also be sorted by Date Added.
To sort items in any view, from the View menu in Finder select Show View Options. Now click the Sort By pop-up menu and choose the sort order: Date Modified, Name etc.
In List view and Cover Flow, move the pointer over the column name you want to sort by, then click it. Click the column name again to reverse the sort order.

4/ Arrange — To arrange items in Finder windows in any view, click the Item Arrangement button, then choose an option, such as Date Created or Size.
When arranging by name, you can keep folders (in alphabetical order) at the top of the list. Choose Finder>Preferences, click Advanced, then select the “Keep folders on top when sorting by name” checkbox.

5/ Resize columns — In List view, Column view, and Cover Flow, drag the hairline divider between the column headings at the top of the window, i.e. between Name and Date Modified.
To expand a column to show all filenames in their entirety, double-click the column divider.
Control-click (hold down the Control key on your keyboard and click) any column to view all columns available. Choose a column name to display or hide it (visible columns have a checkmark next to their name).

More — You can change the text size of file names and, in some views, change the size of file icons. Open a Finder window, select the folder you want to change, then click a View button: Icon, List, Column, or Cover Flow.
Have the folder always open in this view by selecting the ‘Always open in’ checkbox to set specific preferences for specific folders. To have subfolders also open in this view, select the ‘Browse in’ checkbox.
showviewIf a subfolder opens in a different view, select the subfolder, choose View>Show View Options, then deselect the ‘Always open in’ and ‘Browse in’ checkboxes. The checkboxes must be selected for the main folder and deselected for the subfolder.
You can change the icon size, grid spacing, text size, and more by choosing the Select Icon view options.
[These tips came from Apple World Today.]

Five Tip Friday ~ x2: 5 for macOS and 5 for iOS


I inexplicably failed to post five tips last week, for which I apologise – so here are 10 tips, 5 each for Mac and iOS.

spring2

1/ Open folders in new Finder tabs or windows in macOS Sierra — When you open a folder in the Finder (the default application for browsing your Mac’s files), the folder’s contents usually replace the current contents of the window. However, you can open a folder in a new tab or window, if you wish. Open System Preferences (from its icon in the Dock or from the Apple Menu), then click Dock.
Click the “Prefer tabs when opening documents” pop-up menu, then choose your option: Always, In Full Screen Only, or Manually. By default, documents open in tabs only when an app is full screen.

2/ Open folders in tabs or windows — Hold down the Command key on your keyboard while you double-click a folder and it opens in a new tab or window, depending on your Finder preferences. (If the Finder toolbar and sidebar are hidden, double-clicking a folder without pressing the Command key opens the folder in a new window.)
To open a new Finder window without opening a specific folder, choose File > New Finder Window or press Command-N. [From Apple World Today.]

spring13/ Spring-loaded folders — macOS Sierra, as with several previous versions of macOS, supports ‘spring-loaded folders’. These pop open when you drag something onto it while holding down the mouse/trackpad button. Spring-loaded folders work with all folder or disk icons in all views and even in the Sidebar.
Select an icon (not a disk icon) and drag the selected icon onto any folder or disk icon while holding down the mouse/trackpad button. The highlighted folder or disk will flash twice (very quickly), then spring open under the cursor. (You can press the spacebar to make the folder open immediately.) Subfolders wishing this first folder continue to pop open until you release the mouse button. when you release the mouse button, the icon you’ve been dragging is dropped into the active folder. That window remains open; however, while all other windows you traversed close automatically.
To cancel a spring-loaded folder, drag the cursor away from the folder icon or outside the boundaries of the sprung window. The folder pops shut.
You can toggle spring-loaded folders on or off by going to System Preferences > Accessibility > Mouse & Trackpad. (There’s also a setting for how long the Finder waits before it springs the folders open.) [Also from Apple World Today.]

grab4/ Taking timed screenshots — Hopefully you know the standard Mac screenshot commands (Command-Shift 3 for the whole screen, Command-Shift 4 to select an area with a crosshair). But Apple includes an application (program) in your Applications folder, then in turn in the Utilities folder, that can take them at timed intervals. Open Applications and launch Grab.
When Grab launches, it just waits there with its menus for you to do something. To take a timed screenshot, pick that option from the Capture menu or press Shift-Command-Z. A dialogue box will appear to tell you what’s what. Click Start Timer and as the dialogue box notes, you’ll have ten seconds to set up your screenshot. (If you find that Grab isn’t including your cursor and you’d like it to, select that option within Grab > Preferences and choose one of the cursors there to include it in your next timed screenshot, or if you would prefer no cursor to show up, choose the blank option at the upper-left.
After the screenshot is taken, you can save it out of Grab at its full size.

5/ Maybe a little obscure for some, but you can disable LinkedIn birthdays in macOS Sierra Calendar — There’s a Birthdays calendar under the Other category in macOS Calendar. Uncheck or delete that one, as it’s one LinkedIn uses. You can also disable LinkedIn in your Contacts’ Preferences > Accounts category.

Now, five for iOS:

1/ Enable Siri for third-party apps in iOS 10 — For third-party apps, Siri support is off by default, and has to be manually toggled on app-by-app for titles that support the technology. There aren’t many that do support Siri so far, but for those that do, open the Settings app from the iOS home screen, then scroll down to the Siri menu option. The next step is to tap on the vague App Support option.
To use Siri once you’ve turned it on for any supported apps, you have to mention an app by name. Saying “find men’s fashion pins on Pinterest” will generate results, for example, while saying “find men’s fashion pins” will not only fail to open Pinterest, but potentially create wacky consequences as Siri tries to interpret what you mean.

2/ Create your own live wallpapers with iPhone 6-7 — First, take a Live Photo by tapping the little circle icon at top centre above the viewfinder screen in the Camera app on any iPhone that supports 3D Touch.
In the app, select the photo you’d like to turn into a Live wallpaper.
Centre the image to your liking, then tap Next.
3D Touch the screen by pressing down in order to get a preview of the wallpaper.
Tap the wand icon in the lower left corner to choose between the animation effects.
Tap Save to export it to your Camera Roll.
Once the photo has been saved, go to Settings > Wallpaper > Choose a new wallpaper to find it (note that this is where you can set any image you took as a Wallpaper, for the Home and/or Lock screen). Note Live Wallpapers will only work on iPhone 6s or later – as long as your iPhone supports 3D Touch, this will work for you.
(An app called LivePapers can turn any photo into a Live Photo. It’s NZ$2.49/US$1.99 in the App Store. It lets you turn any still photo into a Live Photo, which you can then set as a wallpaper on supported iPhones.)

3/ Change the default search engine in iOS Safari — Most iOS users are blissfully unaware of the fact they can easily change the default search engine that’s used by the Safari browser on the iPhone, iPad and iPod touch. While the default engine is still Google, it’s also possible to change to Bing, Yahoo, or even DuckDuckGo. Here’s how to do it.
Launch the Settings app and scroll down to Safari (it’s near the bottom of the list of Apple pre-installed apps), tap on it, and the top item on the screen that’s displayed is Search Engine (see image below).
Now tap on the search engine you’d like to make your default (see image below). Now when you enter search text into the search/address field at the top of the Safari screen, the results that are returned are from the new search engine.

4/ Search in secret — As above, you can choose a search engine that doesn’t track and record your searches, say if you’re using a work phone or you simply don’t want to leave a trace. As above, just choose DuckDuckGo … it may not be as comprehensive with results as Google.

5/ Speed searches by turning off Safari Suggestions — Because the suggestion may take a split second longer to load than the search results below it, you may inadvertently hit the suggestion instead of the term you wanted. There is a really quick way to fix this, though, so let’s pop over to Settings and check it out, shall we? It’s under the Safari preferences.
Toggle off Safari Suggestions there, and now your search results will now not try to do anything fancy or extra.

Five Tip Friday ~ Transferring files iPhone to Mac, Hey Siri, prioritise downloads, sort Calendar spam


itfiles1/ Transfer files from iDevice to Mac via iTunes — There are various ways to transfer files from iPad/iPhone to Macs, but not all of them are reliable all of the time (like AirDrop). But iTunes file transfer is reliable for the apps that support it, and you’re not limited by file size.
Privacy is another benefit, since files you transfer aren’t uploaded to someone else’s servers (i.e., via cloud services): they go direct.
iOS devices don’t have an accessible file system like macOS does, but each app has its own document library. iTunes File Transfer lets you copy files to and from each app library.
Plug in your iPhone, iPod or iPad to a Mac with iTunes and the device shows up in the program. After clicking on the phone icon in iTunes (it appears as a little icon at top left), click on Apps on the left sidebar. Scroll down (make sure your cursor isn’t over a scrolling internal window, but over the main part of this interface) until you see the section File Sharing. There’s a list of apps currently installed on your device capable of transferring files.
If you made a movie with iMovie for iOS, for example, you can export it to iTunes. Then, using your Mac, you can open iTunes and save it to your computer. You can also do the opposite, and drag a video into iMovie using iTunes.

2/ Keep Siri from listening for Hey, Siri requests — One of the most convenient features of the newer iPhones is to have Siri always listening whether you have power connected or not. Any iPhone with the M9 chip can listen for the key words Hey Siri all the time to act upon any requests you give. But something that sounds like Hey Siri can activate Siri. Normally instances such as this are few and not a real issue, but this may not be the case in holiday season with lots of people about.
While you can disable Siri entirely by going to Settings > Siri > Siri, a much quicker way to avoid this is to quickly turn the iPhone on its face, since when the iPhone is face down, the proximity sensor stops Siri from listening. As long as the top front of the phone is blocked, Siri cannot listen. That’s why it’s very difficult to get Siri to respond while in a pocket or bag. It’s a low tech solution to a high tech problem.

prioritize3/ Prioritise app downloads — When downloading a number of apps on my phone, you may want to use one that’s in the process of being downloaded. In iOS 10 with an iPhone that supports 3D Touch (iPhone 6s, 7), you can choose to prioritise one download over another: with multiple apps installing, just press with a little force on the app you’d like to prioritise. When you do so, a menu pops up with that option.

4/ Get rid of Calendar spam — Some iOS and macOS users have received calendar invite spam, so if you began seeing invitations to an event in your calendar for Ugg Boots, Ray-Ban sunglasses and other products, thanks to spammers taking advantage of a long-available feature in iCloud that extracts invites from email and presents them as notifications in calendar apps.
In iOS, you can slide left and then choose Delete, which removes the invitation without providing a response (no similar option appears in macOS).
The best option, however, is to disable this automatic invitation parsing altogether. Go to your iCloud Calendar page via a desktop browser. (Apple doesn’t allow you to use iCloud.com via mobile Safari) – i.e., log into ww.icloud.com.
Click the gear icon in the lower-left corner.
Select Preferences.
Click the Advanced icon.
In the Invitations section, change the option from In-App Notifications to Email to iCloud Address.
Now spam invitations will appear in your inbox – or, more likely, get automatically marked as spam and never bother you.

5/ More Calendar spam flexibility — This is slightly inconvenient if you routinely received and wanted calendar notifications for invitations sent via email—you’ll have to look for these in your inbox and click to add them to your calendar.
If you have outstanding invitations that you can’t delete after making that change, follow these steps:
Via iCloud, iOS Calendar, or any calendar app in macOS, create a “spam” calendar.
Assign the invitation to the spam calendar without clicking Accept, Decline, or Maybe.
Delete the spam calendar. Click the Delete and Don’t Notify buttons when prompted.