Tag Archives: tips

Five Tip Friday ~ Quirks and tips for Messages, Activation Lock Status


With the dearth of iDevice news today, here are five tips for iPhone.

1/ Use the full-screen camera — When you’re messaging with someone from your iPhone, you can tap the arrow next to the typing field to access your pictures with the little camera icon that’ll appear.
Once you’re in that camera mode, though, all you’ll see is a few of your recent images and a tiny viewscreen on the iPhone.
That small little viewfinder panel, however, lets you swipe from left to right (see that little left-punting arrow on the left, above?) to reveal another couple of options: a full-screen camera viewfinder and access to your whole Photos library (below). Now you can use your full-screen camera within Messages or look through your entire photo library on your device, so if there’s a picture from a few months back, you don’t have to switch apps to find it.

2/ Share your location — There’s a really quick way to share your location with someone you’re messaging, so he or she can route to where you are or know how long it’ll take to get to you. To do this, tap the small ‘i’ at the top of any Messages conversation…
Tapping the Info button in a chat reveals the Send My Current Location feature. That’ll immediately pass along your location info into the chat, and your recipient can then touch that map to get directions right to where you are.

3/ Draw on videos — To add lines, circles, arrows etc within Messages to videos and images, tap the arrow and then touch the heart icon. Tap the Video Camera button, and you can draw on your screen to highlight whatever you like.
You can either draw before you start taking a video, which will superimpose your drawing over what you record, or you can draw during video-recording to highlight something at a specific moment.

4/ See which number someone used — If you’re not sure which number or email address is the correct one to use for texting with a contact, you can tell within the Messages app by seeing which one he or she has used recently. Start by tapping their name at the top of your conversation to access their contact info.
When that appears, look for which number is marked Recent.
[These four tips came from Melissa Holt at the Mac Observer – this link has more pictures than I have published.]

5/ How to still check an iPhone’s Activation Lock — Apple deleted its iCloud Activation Lock status check tool from its website earlier this year. That tool was a simple yet effective method of checking whether a used iPhone, iPad, iPod or Apple Watch was stolen. But a newly discovered workaround promises an alternative online resource for buyers in the market for secondhand iOS devices [AKA iDevices].
Apple’s online checker involved entering an IMEI, so the tool served as an ideal source for generating valid serial numbers. It has been theorized that Apple scrapped the online resource to better protect its customer base.
But owners or potential buyers can still check Activation Lock status by IMEI through Apple’s own support pages. Be forewarned: the workaround’s success is spotty and it might be completely removed from Apple’s website at any time.
First, visit Apple’s Support website and select iPhone. Click on a search category related to hardware, for example Battery, Power & Charging or Repairs & Physical Damage, then select a specific problem like ‘Buttons not working’.
On the next page, you should see an option to Send in for Repair. If the item is not listed, go back and select a different device problem from the previous screen. Clicking through Send in for Repair will retrieve a page that allows users to ‘Enter your serial number, IMEI, or MEID’.
[These numbers, by the way, are in on your iPhone and iPad and iPod Touch under Settings>General>About. You should record these or take a screenshot of the page by pressing the Home and Sleep buttons at the same time and emailing the image your iDevice records to your Photos library to your Mac or PC.]
Enter the IMEI of a target device to check its Activation Lock status. It should be noted that the described method is not always successful. In some cases, Apple’s website will direct users to sign in with their Apple ID, which the company normally uses to facilitate service with linked iCloud devices.
The workaround seems to be a carryover from the days when iCloud Activation Lock status was a thing. It remains unclear how long the loophole will remain active in its current form, as Apple appears to be — slowly — transitioning the entire Support website to lead directly to users’ Apple ID accounts.

Five Tip Friday ~ macOS Safari


quikws

1/ Quick website search in macOS Sierra’s Safari — In macOS Sierra’s Safari, you can enable Quick Website Search thanks to many websites offering their own integrated engine for searching within sites.
Safari provides shortcuts to these searches in some cases, allowing you to search said sites directly from the Smart Search Field. To see which sites your Safari installation currently supports for this feature, click on the Manage Websites button.
However, some sites don’t support this feature. Open Safari’s preferences from the Safari menu, then Search > Quick Website Search > Manage Website. From here, you can list which sites to exclude.

2/ Managing tabs — In Safari, you can create and open multiple tabbed windows so you can load more than one search result at a time, for example, or load a link alongside the link you are currently looking at. You can rearrange how they’re ordered, close them, or save a group of tabs as a bookmark that you can reopen all at once.
To add a new tab, press Command+T or click the plus sign at the far right of the Tab bar, or click a link with the scrollwheel if you have a scroll wheel mouse (yes, it clicks as well asa scrolls), or hold down the Control key on your keyboard, click a link on a page and choose Open In New Tab from the pop-out menu that appears .
To close a tab, move your cursor over the tab above the main web page window, and click the little X that appears on the left.

3/ To jump from tab to tab — Press Command+Shift+→ (right arrow) or Command+Shift+<– (left arrow – these keys are at bottom right of all Mac keyboards.

4/ Rearrange tabs — You can drag and drop a tab to the left or right of another tab to rearrange their order.
To move a tab to a new window. drag it underneath the Tab bar, then let go of your mouse button. Or you can right-click a tab and choose Move Tab to New Window.

5/ Save tabs as bookmarks — You can save every open tabbed window as a bookmark. Right-click any tab (or hold down that Control key and normal-click; or click the Bookmarks menu) and choose Add Bookmark for These Tabs.
You can also save the articles of every currently loaded tabbed window in the Reading List. Right-click any tab (or click the Bookmarks menu) and choose Add These Tabs to Reading List.

pin

Extra: Pin and Unpin tabs — Pinning a website puts the site’s icon in the top left section of the Tab bar (indicated above), allowing you to pull up the site with a click.
Pinned tabs are persistent across all Safari windows, even when you quit the web browser. Pinned tabs sync content across windows, including video. If you right click on a pinned tab, you can close all unpinned tabs. Here’s how to pin a tab: from the View menu, select Show Tab Bar.
Navigate to one of your favourite web sites, such as (ahem) AppleWorld.Today.
Right-click or control-click the tab bar, and select Pin Tab from the pop-up menu that appears. The current web site will be added to the pinned list, which is located at the far left edge of the tab bar.
To remove a pinned web site, make sure the tab bar is visible and right-click or command-click in the pin for the web site you wish to remove.
Select Unpin Tab from the pop-up menu.

Five Tip Friday ~ macOS tips for viewing files instantly, Smart Folders and Safari


qlranger

1/ Use Quick Look in macOS Sierra — Use Quick Look in macOS Sierra (and previous versions of macOS) to view photos, files, movies, sound files, PDFs, even Word files when you don’t have Word, without opening them – the view is in full resolution. You can use Quick Look for items in Finder windows, on your desktop, in emails, in messages, and other places. Select one or more items, then press the Spacebar on your keyboard or, with later apple trackpads, force-click items. A Quick Look window opens. If you selected multiple items, the first item is shown. You can manually enlarge the window by dragging its corners, click the Full Screen green button at top left, and to return to the previous size, click the Exit Full Screen button (that green button again).
To see the next or previous item, click the arrows on the left, or press the Left and Right arrow keys. In full screen, you can click Play to view multiple items as a slideshow.
To see the items in an index sheet view, click the Sheet View button on the left, or press Command-Return.
You can also open the file with its parent Application, which is listed at top right, to actually edit the file (in the example above, it’s the Preview app) and click the Share button on the right.
When you’re done, close the Quick Look window by pressing the Spacebar or force-clicking again, or click the Close button (red button at top left of the window).

2/ Play the video portion of a Live Photo — When you open a Live Photo (which you can only take with iPhone 6s or 7) in the Quick Look window, the video portion of the photo plays automatically. To view it again, click Live Photo in the bottom-left corner of the photo.

smartsfol

3/ Create and modify a Smart Folder — Smart Folders automatically gather files by type and subject matter. They’re updated as you change, add, and remove files on your Mac.
In the Finder, choose File>New Smart Folder. To search for files, enter a topic, a phrase, or another parameter in the search field.
To determine whether the search should include only the names of files or their entire contents, choose ‘Name matches’ in the search suggestions that appear below the search field, then click Name, then choose either Filename or Everything.
To search for additional specific attributes, click the Add buttonbelow the search field, then make choices using the search attribute pop-up menus that appear.
The menus work in pairs; for example, to search for images, you choose Kind from the pop-up menu on the left, then choose Images from the pop-up menu next to it.
Click Save, then specify a name and location for your Smart Folder.
If you don’t want your Smart Folder to be in the sidebar, deselect Add To Sidebar.
You can’t use certain characters, including punctuation such as a colon (:), in folder names. If an error message appears, try using another name.
To change the criteria for a Smart Folder, open the Smart Folder. Begin typing in the folder’s search field, or click the Action pop-up menu , then choose Show Search Criteria.

4/ History in Safari — Want to see the sites you were looking at on your Mac yesterday? Easy. From the History menu, you can choose Earlier Today, or any of the six days preceding that.
Of course, this poses a security concern: anyone else can do the same thing on your Mac if it’s unlocked, to see where you were and to open any of those links – you’re bank account, for example, and if you let this automatically log in (a very bad idea), then you’re really asking for trouble. When you select the Clear History item at the bottom of the History menu, you get to choose just to delete the last hour’s sites, Today, Today and Yesterday or All. Be warned that any logins and auto-logins you went to will also be ‘forgotten’ and you will have to enter your details and/or auto- log in again.

selectdelete

5/ Selectively delete history items — I had never realised you can much more selectively delete history items. When you choose Show All History, which is the very top item in the History menu, you get to click on any one item (or hold down the Command key on your keyboard to select several items) to highlight individual sites and press the Delete key on your keyboard.
You can clear everything with the Clear History …’ button and even search for that distant item.
Double-clicking on any line launches the site, which can also be very handy.

Five Tip Friday ~ macOS Finder view tips


1/ Set the view in the macOS Sierra Finder — The Finder in macOS Sierra offers four ways to view items in a window: List, Columns, Cover Flow and Icon. To choose a view, click your preferred View button at top-left of any Finder window.
In Icon view, each file or folder is represented by an icon (such as the Mac desktop). List view shows details about a file or folder, including its attributes.
Column view provides a visual trail of where you’ve been, and displays a hierarchical view of where a file is stored. Cover Flow is a modified list view that displays a thumbnail view of a file’s contents, which is great for folders of photographs, for example.

finderbuttons

2/ Didn’t know what those buttons were? Turn on the descriptions for them. With a Finder window on the desktop, hold down the Control key on your keyboard and click in the grey area at the top of the Finder window just to the left or right of the folders file name at op centre. From the pop-out that appears, choose Icon and Text, and all your buttons get labels (it’s worth trying this in other apps like Apple Mail and Preview).
Choosing ‘Customize Toolbar’ [sic, and shown above] lets you even select which icons appear in the top area of Finder windows at all, and also get rid of any you don’t require.

3/ More view customisation — There are additional ways to customise how your items are displayed: sort items, arrange icons, and resize columns. Settings for sorting and arranging items in a folder apply until you change them. For example, if you sort your Documents folder by Date Added, the next time you view your Documents folder, it will also be sorted by Date Added.
To sort items in any view, from the View menu in Finder select Show View Options. Now click the Sort By pop-up menu and choose the sort order: Date Modified, Name etc.
In List view and Cover Flow, move the pointer over the column name you want to sort by, then click it. Click the column name again to reverse the sort order.

4/ Arrange — To arrange items in Finder windows in any view, click the Item Arrangement button, then choose an option, such as Date Created or Size.
When arranging by name, you can keep folders (in alphabetical order) at the top of the list. Choose Finder>Preferences, click Advanced, then select the “Keep folders on top when sorting by name” checkbox.

5/ Resize columns — In List view, Column view, and Cover Flow, drag the hairline divider between the column headings at the top of the window, i.e. between Name and Date Modified.
To expand a column to show all filenames in their entirety, double-click the column divider.
Control-click (hold down the Control key on your keyboard and click) any column to view all columns available. Choose a column name to display or hide it (visible columns have a checkmark next to their name).

More — You can change the text size of file names and, in some views, change the size of file icons. Open a Finder window, select the folder you want to change, then click a View button: Icon, List, Column, or Cover Flow.
Have the folder always open in this view by selecting the ‘Always open in’ checkbox to set specific preferences for specific folders. To have subfolders also open in this view, select the ‘Browse in’ checkbox.
showviewIf a subfolder opens in a different view, select the subfolder, choose View>Show View Options, then deselect the ‘Always open in’ and ‘Browse in’ checkboxes. The checkboxes must be selected for the main folder and deselected for the subfolder.
You can change the icon size, grid spacing, text size, and more by choosing the Select Icon view options.
[These tips came from Apple World Today.]

MagBytes 83 for January 2017


mb83The Swiss have arrived so seize the carp! OK, I’m not very good at French and Latin, but MagBytes 83 is here, full of news, views, tips and tricks for all Apple users, free and bulging with info in electronic form.

That’s just a thumbnail at left, so click …

THIS LINK —> issue83jan17 to get this PDF magazine on your device and/or computer.

Five Tip Friday ~ x2: 5 for macOS and 5 for iOS


I inexplicably failed to post five tips last week, for which I apologise – so here are 10 tips, 5 each for Mac and iOS.

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1/ Open folders in new Finder tabs or windows in macOS Sierra — When you open a folder in the Finder (the default application for browsing your Mac’s files), the folder’s contents usually replace the current contents of the window. However, you can open a folder in a new tab or window, if you wish. Open System Preferences (from its icon in the Dock or from the Apple Menu), then click Dock.
Click the “Prefer tabs when opening documents” pop-up menu, then choose your option: Always, In Full Screen Only, or Manually. By default, documents open in tabs only when an app is full screen.

2/ Open folders in tabs or windows — Hold down the Command key on your keyboard while you double-click a folder and it opens in a new tab or window, depending on your Finder preferences. (If the Finder toolbar and sidebar are hidden, double-clicking a folder without pressing the Command key opens the folder in a new window.)
To open a new Finder window without opening a specific folder, choose File > New Finder Window or press Command-N. [From Apple World Today.]

spring13/ Spring-loaded folders — macOS Sierra, as with several previous versions of macOS, supports ‘spring-loaded folders’. These pop open when you drag something onto it while holding down the mouse/trackpad button. Spring-loaded folders work with all folder or disk icons in all views and even in the Sidebar.
Select an icon (not a disk icon) and drag the selected icon onto any folder or disk icon while holding down the mouse/trackpad button. The highlighted folder or disk will flash twice (very quickly), then spring open under the cursor. (You can press the spacebar to make the folder open immediately.) Subfolders wishing this first folder continue to pop open until you release the mouse button. when you release the mouse button, the icon you’ve been dragging is dropped into the active folder. That window remains open; however, while all other windows you traversed close automatically.
To cancel a spring-loaded folder, drag the cursor away from the folder icon or outside the boundaries of the sprung window. The folder pops shut.
You can toggle spring-loaded folders on or off by going to System Preferences > Accessibility > Mouse & Trackpad. (There’s also a setting for how long the Finder waits before it springs the folders open.) [Also from Apple World Today.]

grab4/ Taking timed screenshots — Hopefully you know the standard Mac screenshot commands (Command-Shift 3 for the whole screen, Command-Shift 4 to select an area with a crosshair). But Apple includes an application (program) in your Applications folder, then in turn in the Utilities folder, that can take them at timed intervals. Open Applications and launch Grab.
When Grab launches, it just waits there with its menus for you to do something. To take a timed screenshot, pick that option from the Capture menu or press Shift-Command-Z. A dialogue box will appear to tell you what’s what. Click Start Timer and as the dialogue box notes, you’ll have ten seconds to set up your screenshot. (If you find that Grab isn’t including your cursor and you’d like it to, select that option within Grab > Preferences and choose one of the cursors there to include it in your next timed screenshot, or if you would prefer no cursor to show up, choose the blank option at the upper-left.
After the screenshot is taken, you can save it out of Grab at its full size.

5/ Maybe a little obscure for some, but you can disable LinkedIn birthdays in macOS Sierra Calendar — There’s a Birthdays calendar under the Other category in macOS Calendar. Uncheck or delete that one, as it’s one LinkedIn uses. You can also disable LinkedIn in your Contacts’ Preferences > Accounts category.

Now, five for iOS:

1/ Enable Siri for third-party apps in iOS 10 — For third-party apps, Siri support is off by default, and has to be manually toggled on app-by-app for titles that support the technology. There aren’t many that do support Siri so far, but for those that do, open the Settings app from the iOS home screen, then scroll down to the Siri menu option. The next step is to tap on the vague App Support option.
To use Siri once you’ve turned it on for any supported apps, you have to mention an app by name. Saying “find men’s fashion pins on Pinterest” will generate results, for example, while saying “find men’s fashion pins” will not only fail to open Pinterest, but potentially create wacky consequences as Siri tries to interpret what you mean.

2/ Create your own live wallpapers with iPhone 6-7 — First, take a Live Photo by tapping the little circle icon at top centre above the viewfinder screen in the Camera app on any iPhone that supports 3D Touch.
In the app, select the photo you’d like to turn into a Live wallpaper.
Centre the image to your liking, then tap Next.
3D Touch the screen by pressing down in order to get a preview of the wallpaper.
Tap the wand icon in the lower left corner to choose between the animation effects.
Tap Save to export it to your Camera Roll.
Once the photo has been saved, go to Settings > Wallpaper > Choose a new wallpaper to find it (note that this is where you can set any image you took as a Wallpaper, for the Home and/or Lock screen). Note Live Wallpapers will only work on iPhone 6s or later – as long as your iPhone supports 3D Touch, this will work for you.
(An app called LivePapers can turn any photo into a Live Photo. It’s NZ$2.49/US$1.99 in the App Store. It lets you turn any still photo into a Live Photo, which you can then set as a wallpaper on supported iPhones.)

3/ Change the default search engine in iOS Safari — Most iOS users are blissfully unaware of the fact they can easily change the default search engine that’s used by the Safari browser on the iPhone, iPad and iPod touch. While the default engine is still Google, it’s also possible to change to Bing, Yahoo, or even DuckDuckGo. Here’s how to do it.
Launch the Settings app and scroll down to Safari (it’s near the bottom of the list of Apple pre-installed apps), tap on it, and the top item on the screen that’s displayed is Search Engine (see image below).
Now tap on the search engine you’d like to make your default (see image below). Now when you enter search text into the search/address field at the top of the Safari screen, the results that are returned are from the new search engine.

4/ Search in secret — As above, you can choose a search engine that doesn’t track and record your searches, say if you’re using a work phone or you simply don’t want to leave a trace. As above, just choose DuckDuckGo … it may not be as comprehensive with results as Google.

5/ Speed searches by turning off Safari Suggestions — Because the suggestion may take a split second longer to load than the search results below it, you may inadvertently hit the suggestion instead of the term you wanted. There is a really quick way to fix this, though, so let’s pop over to Settings and check it out, shall we? It’s under the Safari preferences.
Toggle off Safari Suggestions there, and now your search results will now not try to do anything fancy or extra.

Five Tip Friday ~ Transferring files iPhone to Mac, Hey Siri, prioritise downloads, sort Calendar spam


itfiles1/ Transfer files from iDevice to Mac via iTunes — There are various ways to transfer files from iPad/iPhone to Macs, but not all of them are reliable all of the time (like AirDrop). But iTunes file transfer is reliable for the apps that support it, and you’re not limited by file size.
Privacy is another benefit, since files you transfer aren’t uploaded to someone else’s servers (i.e., via cloud services): they go direct.
iOS devices don’t have an accessible file system like macOS does, but each app has its own document library. iTunes File Transfer lets you copy files to and from each app library.
Plug in your iPhone, iPod or iPad to a Mac with iTunes and the device shows up in the program. After clicking on the phone icon in iTunes (it appears as a little icon at top left), click on Apps on the left sidebar. Scroll down (make sure your cursor isn’t over a scrolling internal window, but over the main part of this interface) until you see the section File Sharing. There’s a list of apps currently installed on your device capable of transferring files.
If you made a movie with iMovie for iOS, for example, you can export it to iTunes. Then, using your Mac, you can open iTunes and save it to your computer. You can also do the opposite, and drag a video into iMovie using iTunes.

2/ Keep Siri from listening for Hey, Siri requests — One of the most convenient features of the newer iPhones is to have Siri always listening whether you have power connected or not. Any iPhone with the M9 chip can listen for the key words Hey Siri all the time to act upon any requests you give. But something that sounds like Hey Siri can activate Siri. Normally instances such as this are few and not a real issue, but this may not be the case in holiday season with lots of people about.
While you can disable Siri entirely by going to Settings > Siri > Siri, a much quicker way to avoid this is to quickly turn the iPhone on its face, since when the iPhone is face down, the proximity sensor stops Siri from listening. As long as the top front of the phone is blocked, Siri cannot listen. That’s why it’s very difficult to get Siri to respond while in a pocket or bag. It’s a low tech solution to a high tech problem.

prioritize3/ Prioritise app downloads — When downloading a number of apps on my phone, you may want to use one that’s in the process of being downloaded. In iOS 10 with an iPhone that supports 3D Touch (iPhone 6s, 7), you can choose to prioritise one download over another: with multiple apps installing, just press with a little force on the app you’d like to prioritise. When you do so, a menu pops up with that option.

4/ Get rid of Calendar spam — Some iOS and macOS users have received calendar invite spam, so if you began seeing invitations to an event in your calendar for Ugg Boots, Ray-Ban sunglasses and other products, thanks to spammers taking advantage of a long-available feature in iCloud that extracts invites from email and presents them as notifications in calendar apps.
In iOS, you can slide left and then choose Delete, which removes the invitation without providing a response (no similar option appears in macOS).
The best option, however, is to disable this automatic invitation parsing altogether. Go to your iCloud Calendar page via a desktop browser. (Apple doesn’t allow you to use iCloud.com via mobile Safari) – i.e., log into ww.icloud.com.
Click the gear icon in the lower-left corner.
Select Preferences.
Click the Advanced icon.
In the Invitations section, change the option from In-App Notifications to Email to iCloud Address.
Now spam invitations will appear in your inbox – or, more likely, get automatically marked as spam and never bother you.

5/ More Calendar spam flexibility — This is slightly inconvenient if you routinely received and wanted calendar notifications for invitations sent via email—you’ll have to look for these in your inbox and click to add them to your calendar.
If you have outstanding invitations that you can’t delete after making that change, follow these steps:
Via iCloud, iOS Calendar, or any calendar app in macOS, create a “spam” calendar.
Assign the invitation to the spam calendar without clicking Accept, Decline, or Maybe.
Delete the spam calendar. Click the Delete and Don’t Notify buttons when prompted.

MagBytes 82 for December 2016


mb82MagBytes 82 is here — this is the final issue for 2016, and has the usual roundup of news, views, tips and tricks, updates plus some interesting new products. It looks like the thumbnail at top left, and it’s available from …

THIS LINK ——> issue 82 Dec16

Five Tip Friday ~ Find and open files quickly in macOS Sierra


recentitems

1/ Use Recent iItems — Under the Apple Menu at the upper-left of your screen is an option labeled Recent Items. Hovering over Recent Items (above) will show you the files and applications you worked with recently, and within a couple of seconds, you can open one. (And here’s another quick tip: hold down the Command key – there’s one either end of your Spacebar – while you’ve got that menu up to reveal where those items are in the Finder rather than opening them.

2/ ‘Spotlight’ your files — If you either click on the magnifying glass at the upper-right corner of your screen or use the associated keyboard shortcut instead (it’s Command-Spacebar), you invoke the Spotlight search window. Type in the name of the file you’re looking for or a keyword that appears within it, and you can open that file by just pressing Return if it’s the top result.

3/ Files from the Dock — Under modern versions of macOS, you can right- or Control-click (hold down the Control key on your keyboard and then click) on some programs’ Dock icons to see recent items that have been opened with that app.
Click on one to open it, and it opens.

4/ Ask for your files, literally — Sierra’s version of Apple’s voice assistant Siri lets you search for files using your voice. Just click on its colorful menu bar icon to get started.
Try “find files I opened yesterday,” or “show me Pages documents on my Desktop”. Siri is really handy for quick searches, assuming you’re not embarrassed to be talking to your Mac. When you find what you’re looking for, double-click it within Siri’s window and it opens.

5/ From within apps — Open almost any app (Nisus, Pages, Word, Numbers, Indesign, Photoshop, GarageBand …) and choose Open Recent form the File menu. This is handy if you’ve chosen Clear Menu from the Recent Items menu in the Apple Menu as above for any reason but you know you were working in any of the above apps and more – it’s always worth looking for this menu item.

Extra: How to show the User Library Folder in macOS Sierra — Apple likes to hide this as, be warned, it’s not something you should ever play with unless you really know what you’re doing. So this was well-intentioned, but frustrating for longtime Mac power users. There were still several workarounds to access or unhide the Library folder, but they weren’t immediately obvious or simple (like holding down the Option key when you drop the Go menu in the Finder).
Apple still hides the user’s Library folder by default, but in Sierra you can restore it with a single checkbox: launch Finder and navigate to your user Home folder (you can jump directly to your user folder by select Go>Home from the Finder’s menu bar or using the keyboard shortcut Shift-Command-H).
With your Home folder open, go to View > Show View Options from the menu bar, or use the keyboard shortcut Command-J.
At the bottom of the View Options window, check the box labeled Show Library Folder and then close the window with the red close button in the upper-left. You’ll now see your Library folder listed inside your Home folder, where it will remain unless you uncheck the aforementioned option.
(The handiest thing about this for non-pro users is being able to add your own picture the the Desktop Pictures folder so you can set your own pictures via System Preferences.)