Tag Archives: Do Not Disturb

Five Tip Friday ~ since iOS 11 is so new, here are some more details of its new features


1/ Manually implement Do Not Disturb mode in iOS 11 — The Do Not Disturb feature of iOS  designed to help users stay more focused while they’re behind the wheel of an automobile. It usually kicks in automatically, but you can set it manually.
Do Not Disturb limits notifications on demand or during a schedule you set up. Along with limiting or muting notifications, it can also reply to contacts who send you messages while you’re driving, giving them a heads-up that you’re on the road.
Open the Settings app, tap Do Not Disturb, scroll down to Do Not Disturb While Driving. Tap on “Activate” to choose how you want Do Not Disturb While Driving to be turned on.
If you don’t want to use Do Not Disturb While Driving, set it to manual.

2/ Using the new Messages effects — A couple of new effects are available under iOS 11, dubbed “Echo” and “Spotlight.” To see them, you’ll first type your message, then press with a little force (if your device supports 3D Touch) or press and hold briefly (if it doesn’t) on the blue sending arrow. You’ll then see two tabs at the top for the types of effects you can use: Bubble and Screen.
The Bubble effects only animate the message bubble itself, not the whole screen. Invisible Ink, for example, will require your recipient to tap your message to reveal it.
The new iOS 11 effects are under the Screen section, though, so touch that tab to open it. Once you’re there, you’ll see the first new effect: Echo.
The second new screen effect is called Spotlight – you’ll see it when you swipe from right to left.
When you’re satisfied with the effect you picked, just touch the blue sending arrow again, and your recipient will see your creation.
Be sure, though, to listen to these with your volume up at some point, too, because the sound effects are pretty amusing.

3/ Choose which Control Center widgets to use — The old iOS Control Center had a specific set of controls: Airplane mode button, a Do Not Disturb toggle, a flashlight button, a timer shortcut, and so on. Now, it you don’t want a particular button showing up in Control Center? Just remove it using the Customize setting [sorry about all the US spellings but sic].
For sample, if you want to keep the  Control Center flashlight but could do without the Calculator shortcuts, tap Settings, Control Center, Customize, then start tweaking.
To remove a setting from Control Center, find it in the Include section, tap the red circle next to its name, then tap the Remove button. To add a control, scroll down to More Controls, then tap the green “+” button.
You can rearrange your custom Control Center buttons by holding and dragging the three-line handles next to their names.

4/ Tap and hold a Control Center button to see more options — Simply tapping the Flashlight button in Control Center on an iPhone toggles the flashlight on and off. But if you tap and hold (or “deep press” on an iPhone 6s or later) the Flashlight button, you reveal a five-level slider that lets you adjust the brightness of the flashlight.
Tap and hold the Brightness slider, and you’ll find a button for Night Shift, the sleep-friendly iOS feature that adjusts the color of the screen to warmer, eye-soothing temperatures.
Tap and hold the Timer button and you’ll get a slider that lets you change the length of the timer by swiping up or down.
If you tap and hold the Camera button, you’ll reveal a pair of handy shortcuts: one for Take Selfie, another for Record Video.
Tap and hold others to reveal more hidden Control Center functions.

5/ Turn off iOS 11 Smart Punctuation to avoid data entry problems — An unexpected side effect of Apple’s new Smart Punctuation feature in iOS 11 has manifested and is causing some problems with apps that use Core Data to store strings. Here’s how to turn off Smart Punctuation, and why you might want to for now.
First spotted by SongSheet app developer Gabriel Hauber, Smart Punctuation is periodically inserting a null byte. Specifically, if the user enters two dashes, it generates an en-dash. If the user enters three, then the en-dash is displayed, but a null-byte is appended after the en-dash.
The null byte insertion prematurely ends a string, which as a best case causes a truncation of data —but can also lead to instability and crashing.
In all likelihood, Apple is already working on a fix, and given a brief perusal of developer documentations, it appears to be able to be temporarily disabled by app developers. However, to fix the problem on your personal devices and sidestep the issue for now in its entirety, here’s how to turn off the feature.
In Settings, tap General. Then, tap Keyboards, and toggle Smart Punctuation to off.

Five Tip Friday ~ Some tips for iOS and Watch users


Welcome to September, the month Apple launches an all-new iPhone! Until then lets rev up our existing iPhone use a little. 

1/  Selectively control Read Receipts for iMessage in iOS 10 — A read receipt in iMessage is simply a feature designed to let your contacts know when you’ve read their message. You can go into Settings to turn this on and off at will, but on iOS 9 and before, this setting turned it off for all contacts. With iOS 10 however, it’s possible to control read receipts for each of your contacts if they also have iPhones (otherwise the option is simply not available). Now you can let your boss know when you’ve read her message, while turning the feature off for that weird guy you met on Tinder [to quote Mac Observer!].
Open up a message from one of your contacts. In the upper right part of the screen, tap the blue circle with an ‘i’. There you can share your location, see a history of images and attachments with that contact – and control read receipts.]

2/ Modify AirPods behaviour — Once iOS 11 ships, which may be as soon as 12th September, you will have more options. For now, in iOS 10, you can change how your AirPods react when you double-tap on them, or switch what happens when you put them in your ears. You adjust these options on your iPhone or iPad. To get started, open your AirPods’ case or take them out of it, then visit Settings > Bluetooth on your paired iOS device.
There you’ll see a list of all of the Bluetooth devices you’ve added. If you don’t see Connected next to your AirPods, tap their name to connect.
Within this option, you can disconnect your AirPods (or have your device forget them entirely), change their name, or set what happens when you double-tap one of them. This is probably the most useful adjustment, as you could configure your AirPods to play/pause instead of invoking Siri with a double-tap.
Also on this screen are Automatic Ear Detection, which you can turn off if you don’t like your audio automatically being sent to your AirPods when you put them in your ears—and the Microphone setting. This lets you configure which AirPod you’d like to always be your microphone.

3/ Using 3D Touch in Spotlight — With a recent iPhone (6s/6s Plus or 7/7 Plus), you’re probably accustomed to your favourite uses for 3D Touch: looking at notifications within folders, opening new private tabs in Safari etc. You can also use Spotlight searches to find apps, and then if you press on a result within the Spotlight interface, you’ll get the same options you’d get by 3D-touching the app itself.
Start by swiping down on your home screen to open the iOS Spotlight search function, then type the name of an app into the search field at the top. Press with a little force on the app in the results to get the same Quick Action choices you would get from using 3D Touch on the app icon on the Home screen. You can use this, for example, to quickly find the Camera app and use its Quick Actions.

4/ In iOS 11, set up and customise Do Not Disturb While Driving — For those already beta-testing the next generation of iOS, you can do this now For the rest, you can do this soon. iOS 11 will add Do Not Disturb support for driving so you won’t get distracted while you’re cruising around town. You don’t have to use it, but if you do, it’s easy to set up and customise. Once iOS 11 is installed on your iPhone there’s a good chance you’ll get a dialogue asking if you want to turn on DND when you’re driving. The dialogue will pop up after you move off in your car.
Just tap Turn On While Driving and you’re set. Your iPhone will automatically go into DND mode when you’re in a moving car – it then mutes all incoming calls. You also won’t see other alerts and notifications while your car is in motion. (Of course, it won’ know if you’re driving or a passenger.)
DND While Driving can activate automatically when connected to your car’s Bluetooth, or manually. If you choose Manually, you will need to use the Do Not Disturb button in Control Center to activate the feature.
DND While Driving can auto-reply to text messages too. It’s your business who gets those messages, so you can change the settings and make your own custom reply:
Launch Settings on your iPhone
Tap Do Not Disturb
Choose Auto-Reply To
Select No One, Recents, Favorites, or All Contacts.
If you set your auto-reply to Favorites, it only goes to those people you’re in contact most. If you don’t want anyone to know when you’re in the car, choose No One.
To set an auto-reply, launch Settings on your iPhone
Tap Do Not Disturb
Choose Auto-Reply
Enter a custom reply message.
If you need to get a message through to someone who has DND While Driving active, follow up your first message with a second that only says ‘urgent’.

5/ How to tell if Apple Watch notifications are from a native app or an iPhone app — Sometimes when you get a notification on your Apple Watch, you can tap on it for further options, or to open a corresponding app. At other times, that notification is from your iPhone, and there’s not much you can do with it other than dismiss it.
Here’s how to quickly tell the difference — it’s all in the shape. App icons on watchOS are circles, and when you get a notification from an app that is native to the Apple Watch, tapping on it will open the corresponding app. When an alert arrives, or you are browsing through past ones in Notification Center, the corresponding app icon is located in the upper left. If it’s a circle, tapping once will provide quick options like reply or dismiss, and tapping a second time will open the corresponding app.
But if the icon is a square, that means it’s simply an iPhone notification because app icons on the iPhone are rounded-corner squares.
There aren’t as many options for dealing with notifications not from native watchOS apps. Tap and you’ll have an option to dismiss, with no second tap to open the app, because the app is only on your iPhone.
This subtle distinction of round or square is an easy way to tell what you can do directly from your wrist, without the need to pull your phone out of your pocket.

Five Tip Friday ~ smarter Sends from Mail, Do Not Disturb, folders for Notes, text selection


1/ Automatically select best account to send from in Mac Mail — Apple Mail received a new feature in Sierra that automatically chooses the best account for you to send a new message from, based on who your email is addressed to and what mailbox and message you had selected when you started composing.
To turn this on (or off) open Mail’s Preferences from the menus at the top. Use the Composing Tab in Mail Preferences to access your settings for sending messages. Under the Composing tab, you’ll see a drop-down next to “Send new messages from.” Pick that to view your options.
You might almost always want to send from your work email address, but if you want to try out letting Apple Mail pick for you, then toggle that drop-down to “Automatically select best account.”

2/ Enable Do Not Disturb in macOS to silence notifications — Notifications can be a mixed blessing. For some they keep the chaos of communications down and allow for rapid response to an email or a Tweet, but for others they can be an annoying distraction.
You can silence notifications until midnight quickly, with a single click. To get that done, option-click (hold down the Option key on your keyboard while you click) on the Notifications icon in the upper-right hand corner of the desktop.
To show that Notifications are muted, the icon becomes greyed out. When the icon is greyed, you can still invoke the Notifications tray by clicking on the icon again — but this won’t un-mute them.
To do so, either pop open the Notifications tray and turn them back on with the toggle, or option-click on the Notifications icon in the menubar again.

3/ Who can and can’t bother you — If you want more precise control over what gets to bother you, delve into the settings of the feature itself.
Select System Preferences from the apple Menu (or from the Dock). In the upper right hand corner of the system preferences, select Notifications. From this menu, most parameters of Notification Center are set. Setting the schedule for notifications to not bother you at all during working hours is a good solution for the easily distracted.
There are other settings here, such as the ability to turn them off when the the display is being mirrored for a presentation, or to allow for a particularly persistent caller to break though your need to not be disturbed.
However, another option to quiet the tumult is to tell the most frequent offender to not pop up a notification. Select whatever app you wish to silence from the left hand column, and turn it off, or pare down when it will yell at you.

4/ Set folders in the Notes app — There aren’t a lot of ways to organize notes in Apple Notes, which became so much more powerful in Yosemite. But you can set folders and subfolders – clock the Elis icon at lower left in the Notes window to create a folder. There’s no obvious way to create a subfolder, but in fact all you do is drag one folder into another.
Keep in mind that if you delete a folder, then all of the subfolders and notes will also be deleted.
(Unfortunately, it’s not possible to create subfolders in iOS Notes.But if you create your subfolders on macOS, and do sync over to iOS.)

5/ Text selection tricks — Clicking anywhere within text in a document places your cursor there for deleting or adding to what you’ve written. While you can click and drag to select text, sometimes this means you miss a few letters. If you want to just select one word, it’s much faster to double-click it.
A triple-click selects the entire paragraph your cursor is on.
More sophisticated still: hold that final click and move your cursor – the selection jumps by full words or full paragraphs each time … no missing letters!

Five Tip Friday ~ Take charge of the Home button in iOS; configure Do Not Disturb


I can tell you now, the hardest thing you’re going to find about iOS 10, after 9 years of iPhones, is that Swipe to Unlock will be gone. In iOS 10 you click the Home button once, and again to get the passcode screen. You will then realise how ingrained your Swipe to Unlock behaviour has become. But until then …

1/ Change the double-click speed — Double-clicking your iPhone or iPad’s Home key can be trickier than it sounds. If you aren’t fast enough with your Home key double-clicks (or triple-clicks), you’ll simply wind up back at the home screen rather than, say, switching apps or jumping to your accessibility shortcuts. Tap Settings > General > Accessibility > Home Button, then pick a speed: Default (the fastest), Slow, or Slowest.

2/ Set a Triple-Click behaviour — iOS has many interesting accessibility features: VoiceOver reads out anything on the screen; Zoom lets you zoom in or out on the display by pinching the screen. Grayscale renders all the colours on the display in shades of grey; and Invert Colors reverses all the colours on the screen, making for a de facto ‘dark mode’ while browsing in Safari. There’s also Assistive Touch and Switch Control, a pair of features for those who need help tapping and swiping a touchscreen.
Tap Settings>General and choose Accessibility, then scroll all the way down and tap Accessibility Shortcut. Next, tap the accessibility features you use the most — you can tap one, all, or just a few of them.
Now, go back to the home screen and triple-click the Home button. If you selected more than one accessibility shortcut, a pop-up listing all your selected shortcuts will appear; just tap the one you want. If you only selected one shortcut, that accessibility feature will immediately switch on. Triple-click the Home button again to turn off the accessibility option or to return to the shortcut menu.

3/ Summon Siri from the lock screen. Or not — Siri has a bad habit of appearing on iPhone screens when you press the Home button a bit too long.
If Siri keeps making unwanted appearances on your iPhone or iPad’s lock screen, give this setting a try.
You can’t change the default method of summoning Siri – pressing and holding the Home key – but you can keep her from appearing on your iPhone or iPad’s lock screen: Tap Settings>Touch ID & Passcode, then switch off the Siri option under the Allow Access When Locked setting.

DND4/ Do Not Disturb — A lesser-known feature of Do Not Disturb is that it can be regularly scheduled so your iPhone automatically switches to silent running during certain times of the day. You can set it to leave you alone overnight, for example, and you can define this period – say, between 10pm and 7am.
Go to Settings and choose Do Not Disturb. Here, you can manually activate DND, but if you look underneath that Manual button (left), you’ll see the scheduling feature. Turning on the switch will show you what’s currently selected; if you haven’t set this up previously you’ll see the ‘Quiet Hours’ option. This doesn’t have to be set for night time – you can use it for work hours or afternoon nap time or whatever other time you’d prefer your iPhone to be quiet (Lunch, Your afternoon heavy-work sessions, your commute etc.)

5/ But you can still let important calls through — Once that’s set up, you can configure the ‘Allow Calls’ feature and the ‘Repeated Calls’ feature. At the very bottom is the option for whether or not your phone is fully silent during the scheduled time or only while it’s locked.