The Apocalypticon ~ The world, climate damage, insects, coffee, water wars, Germany, Trump’s US, curbing Facebook, your Apple data, sunlight and germs, cooperation


New research shows microplastics in 90%tyde of the table salt brands sampled worldwide — Of 39 salt brands tested, 36 had microplastics in them, according to a new analysis by researchers in South Korea and Greenpeace East Asia. Salt samples from 21 countries in Europe, North and South America, Africa, and Asia were analysed. The three brands that did not contain microplastics are from Taiwan (refined sea salt), China (refined rock salt), and France (unrefined sea salt produced by solar evaporation). The study was published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.
Killing the world’s biggest organism — The heaviest organism on Earth isn’t a whale or an elephant. It’s a tree – or rather, a system of over 40,000 clonal trees all connected by their roots. Pando, a 13 million pound organism in central Utah, is believed to have sprouted toward the end of the last Ice Age. But after thousands of years of thriving, Pando has run into trouble.
Hawking: there’s no god, but there will be dangerous ‘superhumans’ — Stephen Hawking wrote that artificial intelligence will eventually become so advanced it will “outperform humans.” The renowned physicist who died in March the year warns of both rises in advanced artificial intelligence and genetically-enhanced “superhumans” in his book just published posthumously.
Last week was a wild climate ride — From a landmark special report saying we basically have a decade to get our act together to Hurricane Michael decimating northwest Florida, if ever there was a time for the media to finally ask politicians about their plans to address climate change, this was it. And for once, the media delivered.
Unfortunately, the politicians they consulted did not.
Hyperalarming insect loss — Insects around the world are in a crisis, according to a small but growing number of long-term studies showing dramatic declines in invertebrate populations. A new report suggests that the problem is more widespread than scientists realized. Huge numbers of bugs have been lost in a pristine national forest in Puerto Rico. The study found the forest’s insect-eating animals have gone missing, too. The latest report shows that this startling loss of insect abundance extends to the Americas. The study’s authors implicate climate change in the loss of tropical invertebrates. “Holy crap,” Wagner said of the 60-fold loss. [Indeed.]
Coffee is under threat too — “We are in the middle of the biggest coffee crisis of our time,” said the Guatemalan producer and exporter Josué Morales, who works with over 1300 growers.
World water wars — A United Nations report says we have about a decade to get climate change under control, which, let’s be honest (see above)isn’t likely to happen. So break out your goalie masks and harpoon guns, a Mad Max future awaits! Now, as new research points out, we even know where on Earth the inevitable water wars are most likely to take place [map, below – click it for a closer look].Don’t look the perp in the iPhone — It’s no secret that law enforcement often resorts to workarounds for Apple’s security features, but the Face ID technology of the iPhone X makes things tricky. According to a report from Motherboard, forensics company Elcomsoft is advising U.S. law enforcement to not even look at phones with Face ID. This is because with its Face ID feature enabled, failed attempts to get into the phone could lock investigators out by requiring a passcode that may be protected under the Fifth Amendment (in the US, anyway).

It’s a long way back to Germany — German support for Chancellor Angela Merkel and her conservatives is at an all-time low, and in few places is that more evident than Bavaria.
A booming economy and ever fewer migrants crossing the border into the wealthy alpine state haven’t eased a populist backlash against the Christian Social Union (CSU), which is the closest ally of Merkel’s party, the Christian Democrats (CDU). The CSU has governed Bavaria for all but three years since 1946, most of the time with an absolute majority. But now the far-right party AfD is currently the main opposition in the German parliament and is widely expected to win seats in the Bavarian legislature for the first time when regional elections are held.
Why, ma? When German organisers pulled together a demonstration in Berlin to support “an open and free society,” they had some ambitious goals: they expected roughly 40,000 people to pack the span from Berlin’s city centre, from Alexanderplatz to the Victory Column, where they were holding their final rally of the day.
But more than 240,000 people showed up for the march and rallies … [yep, sounds like Weimar again.] The march comes at a time when Germany’s far-right, anti-immigrant political party, Alternative for Germany (AfD: see above), is gaining ground across the country.

Trump-themed dating app leaks data almost immediately — Mere hours after Fox News revealed the existence of a new Trump-centric dating app, a security researcher apparently uncovered evidence that “Donald Daters” is leaking sensitive user information online.
The app, with the tagline ‘Make America Date Again’, is reportedly dumping photos and biographical information about its users into a publicly accessible database and may even be leaking authentication tokens, which could grant full access to a person’s account, including their private messages.
Trump may be self-made, but he’s far from a self-made billionaire Investigative reporters Susanne Craig and David Barstow say the president received today’s equivalent of $413 million from his father’s real estate empire through what appears to be tax fraud [but that’s what made him so ‘clever’, right?].
Massive partisan gaps in the new US — A new poll gives a clearer picture of what US “tribalism” no looks like: Americans differ not just on their ideology or political team, but on the issues they view as problems. The poll presented registered voters with 18 issues, asking those voters how big of a problem each issue is.
Voters supporting Democrats for Congress this year were far more likely to see most of these as problems, with majorities saying 13 out of the 18 issues are ‘very big’ problems. On many of those issues Democratic voters highlighted, there are yawning partisan gaps. For example, 8 in 10 people supporting Democrats say gun violence is a very big problem, but only 1 in 4 Republicans do. Likewise, 72% of Democrats see climate change as a big problem, compared with just 11% of Republicans.
Trump supported offering ‘free helicopter rides’ — Hilarious, right? As they mean free rides in the manner of Pinochet’s helicopters that dropped captured, bound activists and opponents into the sea. Yeah, it’ ‘just humour’.

Data: How ago all but rid yourself of Facebook — In the immediate aftermath of the news that hackers had access to the personal information of about 30 million Facebook users, Gizmodo shows you how to bolt down Facebook – should you still want to use it – so much less information about you is retained.
And here’s how to download all the data Apple has on you

Oh my lord, is there any good news? A little: your grandmother was right about sunlight killing germs: rooms exposed to daylight have fewer germs.

Excerpt from my forthcoming book: “The reason I reject that ‘me against the world’ scenario is that humans are where we are now because of cooperation, not in spite of it. We socialise and swap stories, and then we help each other dig a channel to redirect water, raise a roof or to dig a field over. In the present day, some of us might consider ourselves rugged individualists but, no matter what we tell ourselves, we have libraries at our disposal, and we use roads, social services, health care and communications networks. All of these were built by combined effort for mutual benefit.”

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Futurology ~ 10 trillion frames, driverless military, digital acting, super-laser, Viking ship, sponge on steroids


Using ground-penetrating radar, archaeologists in Norway have discovered an ancient Viking ship (outlined in green) buried just 50cm beneath the surface of a farmer’s field.

World’s fastest camera shoots 10 trillion frames a second — For the new imaging technique, the team started with compressed ultrafast photography (CUP), a method that it is capable of 100 billion fps. That’s nothing to scoff at by itself, but it’s still not fast enough to really capture what’s going on with ultrafast laser pulses, which occur on the scale of femtoseconds. A femtosecond, for reference, is one quadrillionth of a second.
So the team built on that technology by combining a femtosecond streak camera and a static camera, and running it through a data acquisition technique known as Radon transformation. This advanced system was dubbed T-CUP.
~ I think Zeno ought to step in here. 

The US Army is getting ready to drive into war in driverless trucks — In a year, its ‘Leader-Follower’ technology will enable convoys of autonomous vehicles to follow behind one vehicle driven by a human. It’s a direct response to the improvised explosive devices that caused nearly half the casualties in Iraq and Afghanistan.
~ Surely you just blow up the first truck then? Then they all stop, and let the plundering begin.. The next step is complete soldier-less wars.

Actors are digitally preserving themselves to continue their careers beyond the grave — From Carrie Fisher in Rogue One: A Star Wars Story to Paul Walker in the Fast & Furious movies, dead and magically “de-aged” actors are appearing more frequently on movie screens. Sometimes they even appear on stage: next year, an Amy Winehouse hologram will be going on tour to raise money for a charity established in the late singer’s memory. Some actors and movie studios are buckling down and preparing for an inevitable future when using scanning technology to preserve 3-D digital replicas of performers is routine. Just because your star is inconveniently dead doesn’t mean your generation-spanning blockbuster franchise can’t continue to rake in the dough.
~ So go image yourselves before the botox, filler and plastic surgery looks too obvious. 

Powerful lasers changing labs — The winners of this year’s Nobel Prize in Physics didn’t just make discoveries. Their revolutionary work turned powerful lasers into ubiquitous lab tools. The tennis-court sized Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator, or BELLA, uses one of the Nobel-winning methods to create one of the most powerful laser pulses on Earth.
~ BELLA is chirped pulse amplification on steroids. So you’d hope their aim is pretty good.

Antarctic ice making weird noises — Using special instruments, scientists have discovered weird sounds at the bottom of the world. The noise is actually vibrating ice, caused by the wind blowing across snow dunes, according to a new study. It’s kind of like you’re blowing a flute, constantly, on the ice shelf,” study lead author Julien Chaput, a geophysicist and mathematician at Colorado State University, said in a statement. Another scientist, glaciologist Douglas MacAyeal of the University of Chicago, likened the sounds to the buzz of thousands of cicadas. The sounds are too low in frequency to be heard by human ears unless sped up by the monitoring equipment.
~ Sounds cool.

Ancient Viking ship just metres from a motorway — Using ground-penetrating radar, archaeologists in Norway have discovered an ancient Viking ship buried just 50cm beneath the surface of a farmer’s field. The 20m-long ship, deliberately buried during a funeral ritual, appears surprisingly intact – and it could contain the skeletal remains of a high-ranking Viking warrior.
~ I guess it’s not all that surprising since it’s near the the large and fully intact Jelle burial mound.

Ancient sea sponge on steroids — Scientists from the University of California, Riverside, are claiming to have discovered the oldest known animal fossil – an ancient sea sponge that emerged between 660 million and 635 million years ago.
~ Unfair advantage? 

The Apocalypticon ~ Chinese totalitarianism, animal antics, sunscreen, Molotov’d troll, Chernobyl power, oyster shells, mattock


Interpol President Meng Hongwei has resigned after being detained by Chinese authorities who accuse him of corruption. The shocking turnabout comes days after Meng’s wife said the career police officer had disappeared after he left France to visit his native China. China’s Public Security Minister Zhao Kezhi said on Monday that Meng is being investigated for allegations of bribery — charges that he did not describe in detail. Zhao said his ministry supports the inquiry; he also spoke of the importance of loyalty to the Communist Party’s ideals [my italics].
Apple denies ‘wild’ Bloomberg allegations about Chinese surveillance hardware — Apple (and Amazon) quickly and fiercely refuted claims that rice-grain-sized hardware had been introduced to their server hardware. Another strongly-worded denial is available to read in full – this is one Apple wrote to members of Congress (as Reuters reported). The full letter is now online.

Dinosaurs to blame for us needing sunscreen — The idea is that the ancient ancestors of modern mammals (including humans) had to live underground or were exclusively nocturnal in order to to avoid being eaten by dinosaurs. Therefore, we did not evolve the so-called ‘photoreactivation DNA repair function’. Dang.
But who is to blame for us being overexposed to computer and device screens? Not these Kickstarter glasses! Scott Blew, an entrepreneur and engineer, recalled an article he’d recently read in WIRED about a new kind of film that blocked the light emitted from screens. He wondered if the same technology might work on a pair of glasses, to block the screens that seemed to be everywhere.
It does work (below). They tune out most televisions and some computers, but not the newer crop of smartphones like the just-released OLED-packing iPhones.

Animal antics: Polar bears eating whales — Just over a year ago, 150 polar bears amassed on a remote island off the north coast Siberia to devour a dead bowhead whale that had washed ashore. It was the largest swarm of polar bears ever recorded feasting on a stranded whale — but events such as this could become more common in a warmer world.
Gecko made multiple prank calls — The director of a seal hospital in Hawaii says she was deluged with a more than a dozen mysterious calls to her mobile phone. When she picked up, however, the line was silent.
To make the situation even stranger, the calls were apparently coming from inside the hospital. It turned out to be a rather active tiny gold dust day gecko ..

Molotov hits Russian troll factory — [I love that headline!] Russia’s most famous ‘troll factory,’ a building where Kremlin-financed posters waged a battle of words in the New Cold War, has been hit with a molotov cocktail. No one was injured in the attack.
Chernobyl is producing power again — though not the kind that triggered a nuclear meltdown 32 years ago. Ukraine is now turning to solar power, and in the process, making good use of land that won’t be habitable to humans for another 24,000 years. The modest one-megawatt plant, located just 100m from the infamous Chernobyl nuclear power plant, has been launched by Ukranian authorities. The photovoltaic cells of this €1 million (US$1.6 million) solar station take up four acres of land and produces enough energy to power about 2000 households. [Since no one can live there, it’s an ingenious use of the real estate.]

Now for some good news — Used oyster shells are helping save New York harbourOver 70 restaurants across New York City are tossing their oyster shells  into the city’s eroded harbour as part of Billion Oyster Project’s restaurant shell-collection program. The journey from trash to treasure begins after an oyster half shell is turned upside down and left on an icy tray. It joins hundreds of thousands of other half shells collected in blue bins and picked up (free of charge) from restaurants five days a week. They are trucked to Brooklyn’s Greenpoint neighbourhood and, once cured, they’re used to hatch live oysters which become part of New York harbour reclamation projects.

Excerpt from my forthcoming book: “One famous trope for surviving in zombie apocalypse is to carry a spade, because it is useful and because nobody immediately interprets a spade as a weapon, since it’s such a a common tool. But I prefer a mattock …”

Futurology ~ Life, the universe and all, Europa shards, seamounts, drone stage, Hyperloop, thought-sharing, Neanderthal health


Jupiter’s moon Europa may have massive ice shards

Scientists’ plan to search for life in the universe — A blue-ribbon panel of researchers chaired by the University of Toronto’s Barbara Sherwood Lollar assembled the report at the behest of the US Congress, which asked in a 2017 law that a “strategy for astrobiology” be developed to prioritise “the search for life’s origin, evolution, distribution, and future in the universe.” The 196-page report does not offer easy access to ET, but the steady drumbeat of scientific advancement it documents suggests an increasingly sophisticated understanding of what we know – and don’t know – about biology on our planet and beyond.
~ Well, I like drumbeats anyway. Usually. 

Jupiter’s moon Europa may have massive ice shards — Few moons in the Solar System are as intriguing as Jupiter’s moon Europa. A global ocean of salt water almost certainly surrounds the moon – and it would hold more water than any ocean on Earth. Above this immense sea, where surface temperatures dip to -184 degrees Celsius (-300 degrees Fahrenheit), a crust of water ice forms a shell. Astronomers predict that Jupiter, which bombards the moon with intense radiation, causes the entire moon to groan with gravity’s tug. Europa’s liquid water is a tempting target for future missions looking for possible alien microbes. But before a future lander can search for microscopic ET, the probe might have to contend with a forest of tall, jagged ice spikes. Their research suggests Europa is an icy hedgehog world, covered in ice formations rarely found on Earth.
~ I envisage a new range of Europa Ice Wines … called ‘Shardonay’. Yeah, you wish you’d thought of it!

Unknown seamounts are now known seamounts — Australian scientists have discovered a previously unknown chain of volcanic seamounts near Tasmania. The area appears to be brimming with marine life, including a surprising number of whales who may be using the undersea volcanoes as a navigational tool. The volcanic chain was discovered by scientists from the Australian National University and CSIRO, Australia’s national science agency, while on a 25-day mission aboard the research vessel Investigator to conduct detailed seafloor maps of the region. The undersea volcanoes are about 400 kilometres (250 miles) east of Tasmania, and they’re quite deep.
~ Or maybe the whales are just trying to keep warm. 

Self-healing material uses carbon from the air — MIT chemical engineers have reportedly designed a material that can react with carbon dioxide from the air, “to grow, strengthen, and even repair itself.” According to MIT News, the polymer, which might someday be used as construction or repair material or for protective coatings, continuously converts the greenhouse gas into a carbon-based material that reinforces itself.
~ “This air is hard stuff, we’ll build a world from it!” (to quote the Mekons.)

Smart drones lighting concerts — Typically, you have an artist on stage for a concert singing songs, then a bunch of spotlights beams columns of colour through some fake smoke. But something new is on the horizon, and it’s equal parts creepy and futuristic: swarms of artificially intelligent drones are starting to show up on stages around the world. Some, such as the ones on Drake’s latest tour, of are tiny flying lights that float above the stage. Others, such as a recent Cirque du Soleil experience, featured more complex aircraft outfitted with lampshades that produced an almost ghostly effect. Metallica even has its own drone show.
~ A crash could really spoil your hairdo, though. 

 

 

Inside a Hyperloop capsule — The real Hyperloop is quite different from the initial concept introduced by Elon Musk that had air bearings, supersonic speeds, and solar energy. HTT and Airtificial invested a total of 21,000 engineering hours and 5000 assembly hours to create Quintero One (above), a 32 metre capsule made of 85% carbon fibre; or, as HTT puts it, 85% ‘Vibranium’. The material that covers the capsule takes its name from the Marvel universe, but it doesn’t come from Wakanda: it is a double-layered patented-design that uses 82 panels of carbon fibre and 72 sensors able to detect problems related to the structural integrity of the vessel.
~ When it might travel at close to the speed of sound, structural integrity is very important. 

Three brains sharing thoughts — Neuroscientists have successfully hooked up a three-way brain connection to allow three people share their thoughts – in this case, they played a Tetris-style game. The team thinks this wild experiment could be scaled up to connect whole networks of people, and yes, it’s as weird as it sounds. It works through a combination of electroencephalograms (EEGs), for recording the electrical impulses that indicate brain activity, and transcranial magnetic stimulation, where neurons are stimulated using magnetic fields.
~ Donald Trump seems to be able to share his thoughts without having a connection to anyone, though …

Yes, we can do without coal and save Earth — The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released a report saying the world’s electrical utilities need to reduce coal consumption by at least 60% over the next two decades through 2030 to avoid the worst effects of climate change that could occur with more than 1.5 degrees Celsius of warming. While that reduction seems out of reach, Bloomberg crunched some numbers and found it’s possible to meet consumption-cut targets on the current path.
~ But how reliable is Bloomberg anymore?

Neanderthal healthcare — Neanderthals cared for their sick and wounded, and new research suggests this behaviour was more than just a cultural phenomenon or an expression of compassion — it really did help them survive. To endure the harsh conditions of Ice Age Europe, Neanderthals adopted several strategies, including group hunting, collaborative parenting, and food sharing. New research published in Quaternary Science Reviews is adding another trick to the Neanderthal survival guide: healthcare. And the evidence dates back 1.6 million years ago.
~ OK, hands up who though this headline would be about the US.

Neanderthals helped us survive epidemics — A new study argues we have Neanderthals to thank for helping us cope with the viral tides we encountered as we marched around the globe. Stanford University researchers have identified DNA sequences that evolved in our ancient cousins that can produce antivirus proteins, which more than likely gave some human populations the edge they needed to survive. Roughly 1% of our genome’s coding was written in Neanderthal populations but this is a broad average – many families with African ancestry have zero, for instance, while other populations boast as much as 2% or more. So the question is how much of this difference comes down to the random drift of DNA being passed on around the globe, and how much is due to natural selection giving those with Neanderthal genes an advantage?
~ They seem pretty ugly the way we picture them now, in paleontological reconstructions, but maybe they were snappy dressers or something?

The Apocalypticon ~ Politics, Kavanaugh, climate, poison, Ebola, rat hepatitis, flu, NZ law


Kavanaugh’s family listens at the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing (Image: Jim Bourg, Reuters)

German far right party now at second — In last September’s elections, the Alternative for Germany (AfD) became the first far-right party to win seats in the Bundestag in more than half a century, becoming the official opposition to Merkel’s ruling ‘grand coalition’ of conservatives and social democrats. Although — or precisely because — the AfD is treated as a pariah in the legislature, its support is growing among German voters. Now it’s in second place with 18% of the vote. [They only need to double that to be where Hitler was when he took power.]
Beer-swilling misogynist Kavanaugh requires millions — Since July, when President Trump nominated Kavanaugh, the warring advocacy groups have spent some $10 million on TV ads either assailing or praising him.
Facebook consternation at Kavanaugh support — Hundreds of Facebook employees have reportedly expressed anger that an executive attended Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh’s public hearing last week to support him. Joel Kaplan, Facebook’s head of global policy, was at Kavanaugh’s hearing because he is reportedly close friends with the Supreme Court Justice nominee …

Sagging climate — Never drink from the tap: Americans across the country, from Maynard’s home in rural Appalachia to urban areas like Flint, Michigan, or Compton, California, are facing a lack of clean, reliable drinking water. At the heart of the problem is a water system in crisis: ageing, crumbling infrastructure and a lack of funds to pay for upgrading it.
Indonesian tsunami warning system hadn’t worked for years — After an earthquake and tsunami in Indonesia on Friday left more than 800 people dead, a spokesperson for the nation’s board of national disaster affairs revealed that a critical part of its warning and detection system hasn’t been working for years. Not one of 22 buoys was functional…

Poison — The red tide algae bloom that’s plagued Florida’s Gulf Coast for months has now jumped east to the Atlantic. Florida officials are dubbing it an “extremely rare” occurrence, underscoring just how far from over the state’s algae crisis is.
Old poisons could kill most orcas — A group of industrial chemicals humans started banning decades ago could cause many of the world’s orca whale populations to collapse over the next century, an alarming new study has found.
Artificial sweeteners become toxic in the gut — Researchers from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel and Nanyang Technological University in Singapore tested the toxicity of aspartame, sucralose, saccharine, neotame, advantame, and acesulfame potassium-k. They observed that when exposed to only 1 milligram per millilitre of the artificial sweeteners, the bacteria found in the digestive system became toxic.

Ebola could spread beyond Congo — More than two months since an Ebola outbreak was declared in an eastern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo, health officials are still struggling to end it. At least 130 people have been infected. Last week the World Health Organization declared the risk has gone from “high” to “very high” that the disease will spread to other parts of the country and to neighbouring countries.
Rat hepatitis migrated to a human — A 56-year-old man from Hong Kong contracted the rat-specific version of hepatitis E, something never observed before in a human patient. Health officials are now scrambling to understand how this could have happened — and the possible implications.
US had more flu deaths last winter than in decades — This past winter’s flu season was quickly recognised as one of the worst to come along in a long time. But new data from the Centres of Disease Control and Prevention highlights just destructive it was in the United States. According to new data, there were 80,000 flu-related deaths last season, the single highest toll seen in at least four decades.

New Zealand enacts digital search border control law — The Customs and Excise Act 2018 now in effect sets guidelines around how Customs can carry out ‘digital strip-searches.’ Previously, NZ Customs could stop anyone at the border and demand to see their electronic devices. However, the law did not specify that people had to also provide a password. The updated law makes clear that travelers must provide access, whether that be a password, pin-code or fingerprint, but officials would need to have a reasonable suspicion of wrongdoing.
Customs spokesperson Terry Brown said. If people refused to comply, they could be fined up to $5000 and their device would be seized and forensically searched. Mr Brown said the law struck the “delicate balance” between a person’s right to privacy and Customs’ law enforcement responsibilities. [Yeah, that’s delicate all right!] Council for Civil Liberties spokesperson Thomas Beagle said the law was an unjustified invasion of privacy. [Because, you know, it’s an unjustified invasion of privacy.]

And in good news … it’s spring here in New Zealand and it’s beautiful.

 

Futurology ~ Exomoon, asteroid movie, weather particle, spray-on magic, better rechargeable, novel robot, extinct discovery, Earth memories


History-making moon discovery — Scientists may have detected the first moon orbiting a planet in a far-off solar system, though they caution that they still want to confirm the finding with another round of telescope observations. That planet, Kepler-1625b, is one of thousands scientists have recently detected around distant stars. No one, however, has ever conclusively found an alien moon.
~ The first ‘exomoon’.

Japan’s MINERVA-II rovers have sent back a batch of new photos from Ryugu, including a stunning new video — The 15-frame video was captured by MINERVA-II2, also known as Rover 1B, on September 23, the same day that it and its companion, MINERVA-II1, landed on Ryugu, an asteroid located 280 million km from Earth. The rovers were dispatched by Japan’s Hayabusa2 space probe, which arrived in orbit around the asteroid back in June.
~ I might wait for the series. 

Weather balloon discovers strange new particle — A weather balloon in Antarctica spotted what looked like a high-energy particle from outer space striking the ice back in 2006. Except the particle didn’t hit from above — it somehow travelled all the way through the planet. Eight years later, it happened again.
~ Heavens below!

Starlite paste cooled everything, but it’s lost — The BBC has posted an interesting video series on Starlite, a white paste developed in the 1970s and 1980s by British hairdresser Maurice Ward that could completely insulate any object it coated, like a raw egg or a piece of cardboard, against extreme heat sources. Ward was an eccentric inventor and not a classically trained scientist. He came up with the formula for Starlite by experimenting wildly with different substances. Sadly, Ward took the chemical formula for Starlite to his grave with him in 2011. To this day, nobody knows the exact chemical composition of Starlite, or how one might go about recreating the substance.
~ Dang!

Paint-like coating facilitates ‘passive daytime radiative cooling’ — This is when a surface can efficiently radiate heat and reflect sunlight to a degree that it cools itself even if it’s sitting in direct sunlight. Columbia School of Engineering’s newly-invented coating has “nano-to-microscale air voids that acts as a spontaneous air cooler,” which is a very technical and fancy way of saying that the coating is great at keeping itself cool all on its own.
~ What’s it like with ardour?

Rechargeable zinc-air battery — A company backed by California billionaire Patrick Soon-Shiong, announced it has developed a rechargeable zinc-air battery that can store energy at far less cost than lithium-ion. The technology avoids some of the downsides of li-ion, including flammability and the use of cobalt.
~ It’s also rechargeable for many more cycles, so longer-lived.

Robot wrote a book — Ross Goodwin, a former ghostwriter for the Obama administration, uses neural networks to generate poetry, screenplays, and, now, literary travel fiction. Goodwin used a custom machine to ‘write’ a ‘novel‘ narrating its own cross-country road trip.
~ Seriously? Surely Mills and Boon et al has been written by robots for years, it’s so formulaic.

Plant discovery is already extinct — It took a little while, but a tiny, delicate plant found in Japan 26 years ago has been formally classified as a new species. But after residing in a museum collection since the early 1990s, the single specimen of Thismia kobensis remains the only one ever found. Tragically, this means the so-called fairy lantern may already be extinct.
~ Clone it?

Ancient seafloor muck serves as Earth memory — Digging through sediment layer by layer reveals nearly everything the planet has ever experienced, a veritable history book of life and death on Earth. You just have to learn how to speak in the language of shells, dust, and chemical compounds, which is exactly what Earth scientists probing the muck have learned to do.
~ To get these cores, they use a piston corer up to 8.05km below the waves.