Tag Archives: Flashlight

Five Tip Friday ~ since iOS 11 is so new, here are some more details of its new features


1/ Manually implement Do Not Disturb mode in iOS 11 — The Do Not Disturb feature of iOS  designed to help users stay more focused while they’re behind the wheel of an automobile. It usually kicks in automatically, but you can set it manually.
Do Not Disturb limits notifications on demand or during a schedule you set up. Along with limiting or muting notifications, it can also reply to contacts who send you messages while you’re driving, giving them a heads-up that you’re on the road.
Open the Settings app, tap Do Not Disturb, scroll down to Do Not Disturb While Driving. Tap on “Activate” to choose how you want Do Not Disturb While Driving to be turned on.
If you don’t want to use Do Not Disturb While Driving, set it to manual.

2/ Using the new Messages effects — A couple of new effects are available under iOS 11, dubbed “Echo” and “Spotlight.” To see them, you’ll first type your message, then press with a little force (if your device supports 3D Touch) or press and hold briefly (if it doesn’t) on the blue sending arrow. You’ll then see two tabs at the top for the types of effects you can use: Bubble and Screen.
The Bubble effects only animate the message bubble itself, not the whole screen. Invisible Ink, for example, will require your recipient to tap your message to reveal it.
The new iOS 11 effects are under the Screen section, though, so touch that tab to open it. Once you’re there, you’ll see the first new effect: Echo.
The second new screen effect is called Spotlight – you’ll see it when you swipe from right to left.
When you’re satisfied with the effect you picked, just touch the blue sending arrow again, and your recipient will see your creation.
Be sure, though, to listen to these with your volume up at some point, too, because the sound effects are pretty amusing.

3/ Choose which Control Center widgets to use — The old iOS Control Center had a specific set of controls: Airplane mode button, a Do Not Disturb toggle, a flashlight button, a timer shortcut, and so on. Now, it you don’t want a particular button showing up in Control Center? Just remove it using the Customize setting [sorry about all the US spellings but sic].
For sample, if you want to keep the  Control Center flashlight but could do without the Calculator shortcuts, tap Settings, Control Center, Customize, then start tweaking.
To remove a setting from Control Center, find it in the Include section, tap the red circle next to its name, then tap the Remove button. To add a control, scroll down to More Controls, then tap the green “+” button.
You can rearrange your custom Control Center buttons by holding and dragging the three-line handles next to their names.

4/ Tap and hold a Control Center button to see more options — Simply tapping the Flashlight button in Control Center on an iPhone toggles the flashlight on and off. But if you tap and hold (or “deep press” on an iPhone 6s or later) the Flashlight button, you reveal a five-level slider that lets you adjust the brightness of the flashlight.
Tap and hold the Brightness slider, and you’ll find a button for Night Shift, the sleep-friendly iOS feature that adjusts the color of the screen to warmer, eye-soothing temperatures.
Tap and hold the Timer button and you’ll get a slider that lets you change the length of the timer by swiping up or down.
If you tap and hold the Camera button, you’ll reveal a pair of handy shortcuts: one for Take Selfie, another for Record Video.
Tap and hold others to reveal more hidden Control Center functions.

5/ Turn off iOS 11 Smart Punctuation to avoid data entry problems — An unexpected side effect of Apple’s new Smart Punctuation feature in iOS 11 has manifested and is causing some problems with apps that use Core Data to store strings. Here’s how to turn off Smart Punctuation, and why you might want to for now.
First spotted by SongSheet app developer Gabriel Hauber, Smart Punctuation is periodically inserting a null byte. Specifically, if the user enters two dashes, it generates an en-dash. If the user enters three, then the en-dash is displayed, but a null-byte is appended after the en-dash.
The null byte insertion prematurely ends a string, which as a best case causes a truncation of data —but can also lead to instability and crashing.
In all likelihood, Apple is already working on a fix, and given a brief perusal of developer documentations, it appears to be able to be temporarily disabled by app developers. However, to fix the problem on your personal devices and sidestep the issue for now in its entirety, here’s how to turn off the feature.
In Settings, tap General. Then, tap Keyboards, and toggle Smart Punctuation to off.