Tag Archives: Finder

Five Tip Friday ~ A Mac Medley for Finder, Contacts, Safari and iTunes


1/ How to Force Quit an unresponsive app in macOS Sierra — Of course, try quitting it in the normal way first by choosing Quit from the app’s menu in the menu bar, or press Command (⌘) and while it’s held down, the Q key, or click-and-hold on the app’s icon in the Dock and choose Quit from the pop-out menu that appears.
But if a Mac app acts up and you have to stop it running, you may have to force it to quit so you can relaunch it. Here’s how you use Force Quit in macOS Sierra:
Choose Force Quit from the Apple () menu, or press Command-Option-Esccape (Esc at top left of your keyboard) all together.  (This is similar to pressing Control-Alt-Delete on a PC.)
Select the app in the Force Quit window, then click Force Quit.

2/ Automatically select the best email account in macOS Sierra — You can have Mail in macOS Sierra automatically select the best email account for a new message based on who the email is addressed to and what mailbox you selected when our began composing your new email.
With Mail up and running, click Mail, then Preferences from the top menus.
Click on the Composing tab.
There is a drop-down next to Send new messages from. Choose that to view your options.

3/ Archive information out of the Contacts program — In Apple’s Contacts app, Choose File > Export > Export vCard. This works for any individual card you have selected, but also for entire groups if you select one on the left, or All Contacts for all of them.
Once you’ve selected File > Export > Export vCard, your Mac will ask you where you’d like to save it, and you’re done! This’ll create a .vcf file in your chosen location, and if at any point you’d like to bring back those people, just double-click on the file to reimport their cards.

4/ Check for malicious extensions in Safari — If you find that your browser is still acting weird, you may need to look to see if the adware you picked up added an unwanted extension to Safari.
Safari extensions are software programs you can install to customise the way your browser works. For example, extensions can show news headlines in a bar below the toolbar, change the appearance of web content, or add buttons to the Safari toolbar.
In order to provide these features, extensions may access the content of the webpages you visit. It’s good practice to check which extensions you have installed and make sure you are familiar with what they do.
To check, open the program, then click on Safari > Preferences from the menus at the top. Choose the Extensions tab at the top, and you’ll see the list of what’s been installed. If you see something in your own list you’re unfamiliar with, you can either disable it by deselecting the checkbox I’ve indicated above or remove it completely using the Uninstall button.

5/ Open a playlist in a new window in iTunes 12.6 on macOS Sierra —  With the release of iTunes 12.6 on macOS Sierra, Apple restored the ability [YAY!] to open a playlist in a new window. Why this feature was ever removed shall forever remain a mystery. But here’s how you can open a playlist in a new window.
Launch iTunes.
Control-click or right-click on the playlist you want to open and select Open in New Window. That’s it.

Five Tip Friday ~ Restore a copy, powerful Photos search, recording FaceTime calls, accented letters


MagBytes 85 came out yesterday (click on MagByes Newsletter over there -> on the right to download the last few copies) with the last month of Five Tip Fridays and lots ore info, all for free, but here are five more.

1/ Using macOS: Using Restore a Copy — Pages, Numbers, and Preview and some other apps are actually tracing your steps as you work. Every time you choose File>Save or press Command-S when you’re working on a document, the app saves a version of your file, which you can then revert to if you find you don’t like the changes you’ve made. But by default, reverting replaces the file you’re working on, which isn’t always the best thing.
Once you have saved a document several times, you can go back to the different save points by using the menu option File > Revert To.
Now you can either choose the last opened version to restore if that choice is available, or select Browse All Versions which will take you to a Time Machine–like interface and show you every available file version (below).

When you find what you want, clicking Restore overwrites the existing file you’ve got open, as I mentioned, and it won’t warn you before that happens. But it’s good to know you can visit this restore mode again if you accidentally lose your existing file.

2/ If you need to do is bring back a version without replacing your current one — Hold down the Option key within this view, and Restore switches to Restore a Copy.
Pick that instead, and a new file will open, which you can then save if you want. Neat. [This is another great tip from Melissa Holt.)

3/ Apple added powerful machine learning to Photos in macOS Sierra — To start searching in the Photos app, just click in the search bar in the top right corner of the app and start typing. If you want to find pictures of your dog, for example, type ‘dog’. The app is now able to identify any photos with dogs in them. Photos will search file names for the word ‘dog’, but will also try and find images of dogs that don’t have the word ‘dog’ appended to them!
You can also search for particular faces, places and other things. You can use quite a few different search terms, but items, descriptions, objects, places and people are the best terms to use. The app is much smarter than you might think, so play around with it and see what you can find. (Note that Photos only searches within your photo library; it won’t find images that are saved elsewhere on your Mac. This also won’t work in a Spotlight search; the feature is limited to use within the Photos app itself.)

4/ Record a FaceTime call on macOS Sierra — It’s not that easy to record a Skype call (and recording any call requires permission of the other party in New Zealand law, please note, unless you represent the law anyway), but you can record FaceTime calls relatively easily with this workaround.
Open QuickTime on your Mac (it’s in the Applications folder if it’s not in your Dock – Finder>Go menu>Applications) or use the macOS LaunchPad (whatever method is fine).
Click File in the Menu bar.
Click New Screen Recording.
Click the arrow next to the record button in the QuickTime window.
Choose Internal Microphone from the list of available microphones.
Open FaceTime. Its icon should be in the Dock. If not, it’s in the Applications folder. Or you can use the macOS LaunchPad. Or tell Siri to “Open FaceTime.”
Click the record button in QuickTime.
Click the screen to record your whole screen, or click and drag over the FaceTime window to only record FaceTime.
Begin your FaceTime call.
When the call is over, click the Stop Recording button in QuickTime.
Click File in the Menu bar.
Select Save.
Name your recording, and select where you wish to store it.
Click Save. [I haven’t tried this with Skype but it might work too.]

5/ Accented letters — If you want to type ‘ō,’ hold down the letter ‘o’ on your keyboard for a couple of seconds. A menu pops out above your cursor with the available options for that character. Choose the right one with your mouse/trackpad, or simply press the grey number listed under the correct accented letter (above). This works for any letter, btw, (u, e etc) that can be accented.
This is the easiest way, but there are other ways, too

Five Tip Friday ~ Tidiness tips for macOS


1/ Minimise apps into their icons — You can click the yellow pill button in the upper left corner of a window to minimize an app’s window into the Dock in macOS Sierra, but if you minimize a lot of windows, the right side of the Dock quickly becomes cluttered.
The solution is to minimise windows into their app icons.
Open System Preferences from the Apple menu and choose Dock. Check the box next to ‘Minimize windows into application icon’ (shown above). Now they minimise down into the originating app’s icon – click-and-hold on that in the Dock to see your files (below).


If you have a lot of minimized app windows, and have trouble finding what you’re looking for, control-click (hold down the Control key on your keyboard and click) the app icon to reveal a list of that apps minimized windows. Choose an item from the list and it will open.

2/ Group windows by application in macOS Sierra — macOS Sierra introduced system wide tabs for most (but not all) apps, allowing you to merge multiple windows into a single window or separate merged windows.
With two or more windows of a supported app open, go to the Windows menu in the Finder and choose ‘Merge All Windows.’ All windows of the same app will be grouped into a single window. Each file you have open will appear as a tab inside the single window.
To separate the merged windows into standalone windows of their own, select the merged window to make it active. Go to the Windows and click the ‘Move Tab to New Window’ option. Click it to move the selected tab to a separate window.
This won’t separate all tabs into windows of their own, but separate the current tab to its own window. All remaining tabs will remain grouped into a single window unless you separate them one at a time.
Click the close button on a merged window, and it will close all tabs you have open in it.

3/ Move multiple Events between Calendars — If you’ve got several events you need to move to a different calendar, change to month view by pressing Command-3 or click on the Month option in Calendar’s toolbar or at top-centre of Calendar.
Now find the events you’d like to move, hold down Command on your keyboard and click on each one to select them all in turn.
When your events are all highlighted, right- or Control-click on any one of them. From the contextual menu that appears, choose the ‘Calendar’ option and pick the one you’d like to move your selected events to. Simple.

4/ Multiple ways to move items to Trash — Trash is a To put item(s) in the Trash, once can simply drag the item(s) to the Trash icon, or move highlighted file(s) to the Trash using the keyboard combo Command-Delete. If you realize you made a mistake, you can Undo the operation by choosing File > Undo, or the keyboard combo Command-Z.
If you’d like to delete highlighted items immediately, you can hold down Option and select File > Delete Immediately…. Alternately, you can use keyboard combo Command-Option-Delete. Either way, you’ll received a confirmation dialogue that the operation is permanent and can’t be undone.

5/ Empty stubborn Trash items — ToIf there are files in the Trash, which you can confirm visually because you’ll see items in the Trash, you can empty it by either choosing Finder > Empty Trash…, or using keyboard combo Shift-Cmd-Delete. You’ll be presented with a confirmation dialog asking if you’re sure. You can also hold down Option and select Finder > Empty Trash, or use keyboard combo Shift-Option-Command-Delete. Notice that since there isn’t a trailing ellipsis after the choice, it will be done immediately without a confirmation dialogue. [If this still doesnt work, you need Terminal, as detailed here.]

Five Tip Friday ~ x2: 5 for macOS and 5 for iOS


I inexplicably failed to post five tips last week, for which I apologise – so here are 10 tips, 5 each for Mac and iOS.

spring2

1/ Open folders in new Finder tabs or windows in macOS Sierra — When you open a folder in the Finder (the default application for browsing your Mac’s files), the folder’s contents usually replace the current contents of the window. However, you can open a folder in a new tab or window, if you wish. Open System Preferences (from its icon in the Dock or from the Apple Menu), then click Dock.
Click the “Prefer tabs when opening documents” pop-up menu, then choose your option: Always, In Full Screen Only, or Manually. By default, documents open in tabs only when an app is full screen.

2/ Open folders in tabs or windows — Hold down the Command key on your keyboard while you double-click a folder and it opens in a new tab or window, depending on your Finder preferences. (If the Finder toolbar and sidebar are hidden, double-clicking a folder without pressing the Command key opens the folder in a new window.)
To open a new Finder window without opening a specific folder, choose File > New Finder Window or press Command-N. [From Apple World Today.]

spring13/ Spring-loaded folders — macOS Sierra, as with several previous versions of macOS, supports ‘spring-loaded folders’. These pop open when you drag something onto it while holding down the mouse/trackpad button. Spring-loaded folders work with all folder or disk icons in all views and even in the Sidebar.
Select an icon (not a disk icon) and drag the selected icon onto any folder or disk icon while holding down the mouse/trackpad button. The highlighted folder or disk will flash twice (very quickly), then spring open under the cursor. (You can press the spacebar to make the folder open immediately.) Subfolders wishing this first folder continue to pop open until you release the mouse button. when you release the mouse button, the icon you’ve been dragging is dropped into the active folder. That window remains open; however, while all other windows you traversed close automatically.
To cancel a spring-loaded folder, drag the cursor away from the folder icon or outside the boundaries of the sprung window. The folder pops shut.
You can toggle spring-loaded folders on or off by going to System Preferences > Accessibility > Mouse & Trackpad. (There’s also a setting for how long the Finder waits before it springs the folders open.) [Also from Apple World Today.]

grab4/ Taking timed screenshots — Hopefully you know the standard Mac screenshot commands (Command-Shift 3 for the whole screen, Command-Shift 4 to select an area with a crosshair). But Apple includes an application (program) in your Applications folder, then in turn in the Utilities folder, that can take them at timed intervals. Open Applications and launch Grab.
When Grab launches, it just waits there with its menus for you to do something. To take a timed screenshot, pick that option from the Capture menu or press Shift-Command-Z. A dialogue box will appear to tell you what’s what. Click Start Timer and as the dialogue box notes, you’ll have ten seconds to set up your screenshot. (If you find that Grab isn’t including your cursor and you’d like it to, select that option within Grab > Preferences and choose one of the cursors there to include it in your next timed screenshot, or if you would prefer no cursor to show up, choose the blank option at the upper-left.
After the screenshot is taken, you can save it out of Grab at its full size.

5/ Maybe a little obscure for some, but you can disable LinkedIn birthdays in macOS Sierra Calendar — There’s a Birthdays calendar under the Other category in macOS Calendar. Uncheck or delete that one, as it’s one LinkedIn uses. You can also disable LinkedIn in your Contacts’ Preferences > Accounts category.

Now, five for iOS:

1/ Enable Siri for third-party apps in iOS 10 — For third-party apps, Siri support is off by default, and has to be manually toggled on app-by-app for titles that support the technology. There aren’t many that do support Siri so far, but for those that do, open the Settings app from the iOS home screen, then scroll down to the Siri menu option. The next step is to tap on the vague App Support option.
To use Siri once you’ve turned it on for any supported apps, you have to mention an app by name. Saying “find men’s fashion pins on Pinterest” will generate results, for example, while saying “find men’s fashion pins” will not only fail to open Pinterest, but potentially create wacky consequences as Siri tries to interpret what you mean.

2/ Create your own live wallpapers with iPhone 6-7 — First, take a Live Photo by tapping the little circle icon at top centre above the viewfinder screen in the Camera app on any iPhone that supports 3D Touch.
In the app, select the photo you’d like to turn into a Live wallpaper.
Centre the image to your liking, then tap Next.
3D Touch the screen by pressing down in order to get a preview of the wallpaper.
Tap the wand icon in the lower left corner to choose between the animation effects.
Tap Save to export it to your Camera Roll.
Once the photo has been saved, go to Settings > Wallpaper > Choose a new wallpaper to find it (note that this is where you can set any image you took as a Wallpaper, for the Home and/or Lock screen). Note Live Wallpapers will only work on iPhone 6s or later – as long as your iPhone supports 3D Touch, this will work for you.
(An app called LivePapers can turn any photo into a Live Photo. It’s NZ$2.49/US$1.99 in the App Store. It lets you turn any still photo into a Live Photo, which you can then set as a wallpaper on supported iPhones.)

3/ Change the default search engine in iOS Safari — Most iOS users are blissfully unaware of the fact they can easily change the default search engine that’s used by the Safari browser on the iPhone, iPad and iPod touch. While the default engine is still Google, it’s also possible to change to Bing, Yahoo, or even DuckDuckGo. Here’s how to do it.
Launch the Settings app and scroll down to Safari (it’s near the bottom of the list of Apple pre-installed apps), tap on it, and the top item on the screen that’s displayed is Search Engine (see image below).
Now tap on the search engine you’d like to make your default (see image below). Now when you enter search text into the search/address field at the top of the Safari screen, the results that are returned are from the new search engine.

4/ Search in secret — As above, you can choose a search engine that doesn’t track and record your searches, say if you’re using a work phone or you simply don’t want to leave a trace. As above, just choose DuckDuckGo … it may not be as comprehensive with results as Google.

5/ Speed searches by turning off Safari Suggestions — Because the suggestion may take a split second longer to load than the search results below it, you may inadvertently hit the suggestion instead of the term you wanted. There is a really quick way to fix this, though, so let’s pop over to Settings and check it out, shall we? It’s under the Safari preferences.
Toggle off Safari Suggestions there, and now your search results will now not try to do anything fancy or extra.

Five Tip Friday ~ Mac tips to make your day better


Coz we all need a better day sometimes …

20160427_Customize1/ Add handy buttons to Mail’s toolbar — If you right- or Control-click on the grey area at the top of Mail’s window (and this is worth trying elsewhere, BTW, ie in the Finder, Safari …), choose Customize Toolbar from the pop-up that appears. You will then find extra buttons you can drag up into your toolbar for easy use.
Some people like ‘Organize by Conversation’ available under the View menu, but if you prefer to look at emails as individual items instead of as long chains of responses, you can use the Show Related Messages button to temporarily show the conversation for the selected email only, which can be really useful.

2/ Redirect — Using Redirect is a different method for forwarding emails when you’d like someone else to respond to them. When you forward a message the usual way, Mail changes the colour of the quoted text and puts the forwarding info at the top. When the person you’ve forwarded it to clicks Reply, it will send the response back to you, as you’re the one who forwarded it. But if you use Redirect, it leaves out all of that quoted text formatting and when the person you’ve redirected the message to clicks Reply, the response goes back to the original sender, just as if the email had been sent to the appropriate person in the first place.

3/ Move — You can always drag-and-drop emails into your mailboxes using the sidebar, but you might prefer the Move button. You just have to select the item you want to file away, and then click the Move button to get quick drop-down list to tell it where to go. For anyone with dexterity problems, this is often easier than dragging and dropping, as you don’t have to simultaneously hold your mouse or trackpad button down while you’re scrolling the sidebar. [These came from the Mac Observer, which has more pictures.]

DragN

4/ Back up text substitutions — Open System Preferences, go into the Keyboard option, then click Text. You will then see any keyboard substitutions you have set up (for example, I can type ‘mw’ in anything and my Mac fills out my full, lengthy home email address for me). Select one to modify it (click on one) or choose Command A (while the Command key is held down, press the A key) to select all of them. Now click anywhere on this fully selected list and drag them out to the desktop.  This creates a file on the desktop called ‘Text Substituions.plist’. If you ever lose your substitutions, you can just drag-and-drop them back into that same field in System Preferences, so keep this tiny file somewhere safe.

5/ Quick desktop cleanup — Hopefully you know that files strewn all over your Mac;s desktop is NOT a good idea. If anything goes wrong, these are easily lost or damaged as the Finder is NOT designed to look after files that aren’t, well, filed in Documents, Pictures etc. Not only that, since Finder is not designed to care for this load, your Mac will slow down and struggle, plus practically it’s harder to find files that aren’t categorised by their parent folders (Documents, Pictures, Movies …).
But you can delay your filing job, and speed your Mac up just be creating a new folder on the Desktop (click on the desktop, choose New Folder from the File menu) and give it a name like ToFile or ToSort or something, then drag all your desktop files into this. Much better. (But you really should go through and file these every couple of weeks.)

iCloud Photo Sharing, My Photo Stream, apps for Mac power users


Photostrm

iCloud Photo Sharing vs My Photo Stream: do you need both? Apple offers iCloud Photo Sharing and My Photo Stream on its various Mac OS X and iOS devices. Do you need both? If not, which one is best for you? Apple World Today tries to simplify matters. With My Photo Stream, you can access the recent photos that you take with your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch on your Mac and PC as long as you have iCloud set up on all of your devices. Photos are stored for 30 days. To save or back up your pics, you have to save them from My Photo Stream to your iOS or Mac OS X device.

Mac power suers Finder replacement (free) — Despite many improvements over the year, most radically with OS X in 2001, the core functionality of Apple’s Finder remains largely the same, despite efforts to improve upon the experience even today. Commander One is a Mac application written entirely using Apple’s new Swift programming language that provides an alternative to the Finder.

TopXNotes is the Mac OS X tool for ‘power user’ note takers — Tropical Software developed TopXNotes, an US$39.99 note pad utility for the Mac, for power note-takers.  With Tropical Software’s solution, notes can be as long as you need want, and you can customise the style, size, color and highlight color. My favorite feature is QuickNotes, where you can tag any note as a “QuickNote” and have it accessible without having to bring TopXNotes itself to the front of your work screen.

Mac OS X — hidden features


Your Mac can listen to your words and type them out.
Your Mac can listen to your words and type them out.

1/ Dictate your words instead of typing them — Your Mac can take your dictation and turn your words into text (you no longer need to buy Dragon Dictate). But it’s disabled by default. To enable it, launch System Preferences; select Dictation & Speech; and then click the Dictation tab.
Now click the On button. Enable the Use Enhanced Dictation checkbox if you want to use dictation without an Internet connection. Choose a language, if you need something other than English and your language is supported (but a lot are, from Catalan to Vietnamese) but even with English, you can choose US, Australian, UK or Canadian accents.
Add a keyboard shortcut to toggle dictation on and off without revisiting System Preferences’ Dictation & Speech pane. I made mine Control-F15 by selecting Customise (sic).
Finally, choose a microphone by clicking the little inverted caret below the microphone icon and selecting the mic you want to use if you have more than the internal one each Mac has.
The mic icon becomes your audio level meter; make a loud noise like a clap or a whoop and watch it bounce up and down.

Now, to dictate to your Mac, launch your favourite word processor and turn on dictation using the keyboard shortcut you created and just start talking. The words appear on in your word processor document like magic– especially if you have one of the supported accents, anyway.

Mac OS X dictation has improved  a lot with Yosemite
Mac OS X dictation has improved a lot with Yosemite

2/ Advanced dictation tricks — You can enable advanced dictation commands to do even cooler stuff like edit text and control other functions on your Mac using only your voice.
Launch System Preferences again, but this time select the Accessibility pane.
Click Dictation in the list on the left. Click the Dictation Commands button, and check the Enable Advanced Commands checkbox.
Now you can speak advanced commands such as: select the next or previous word, sentence, or paragraph.
Go to the beginning or end of a word, sentence, paragraph, or document.
Undo; Redo; Cut, Copy, or Paste
Switch to or launch applications. It’s not as powerful as, and lacks many advanced features of, a dedicated speech recognition program like Dragon Dictate, it still works well enough.

 

Customise your toolbars
Customise your toolbars

3/ Turn icon labels on in the toolbar — Hold the Control key on your keyboard down and click in the grey area at the top of a Finder window – this area is called the Title Bar. This triggers a ‘Contextual Menu’ that lets you turn on Icon and Text instead of the default Icon – now you can tell what those icons actually stand for. (This works in many programs, like Apple Mail for instance.)
A Control-click is a right click, if you have that feature turned on for a mouse or trackpad. You can also choose Customize from the pop-out list to do what we talk about next …

4/ Customise Mac OS X’s Finder toolbars — In the Finder, go to the View menu and choose Customize [sic] Toolbar or initiate it with a Control-click as above.
Now you can add or remove items by dragging and dropping for the range such as Dropbox, Connect (to remote locations), Get Info, Quick Look, Path (my personal must-have) and more. Adjust them in the order you want, and you can finally have something useful up there to help with Finder file navigation and management.

5/ Spotlight’s Privacy feature — You might have a folder full of embarrassing or otherwise private (banking, for example) files. You might have buried that folder 10-deep in an obscure place, but a Spotlight search will uncover those files in a jiffy.
Luckily, Spotlight has a built-in way to exclude certain folders – or even entire external hard drives – from its searches.
Open System Preferences, choose Spotlight, select the Privacy tab, and then click the plus button at the lower-left to add a new folder to the list or just drag items into that white box from the Finder. The folders you add and their contents are then excluded from your searches.

Five Tip Friday ~ Mac tips for better Finder work


Recent Items offers fast, easy, always-available access to your last-used documents and apps
Recent Items offers fast, easy, always-available access to your last-used documents and apps

1/ Recent items — One of my favourite general Mac Finder features is the Recent Items folder, which lists the last few apps and the last few documents you opened. It’s in the Apple menu so you can use the feature no matter what you are doing. Within apps, under the File menu, there’s also an Open Recent option – this is handy as you can see the last few documents you had open in that particular app.
Security — remember, if you can see these things, so can anyone else. Luckily you can clear these – select Apple Menu>Recent Items and choose Clear Menu from the bottom. In apps, the Open Recent also gives you the option to clear this if you want to delete the easy-open of files you have been working with/looking at.
[Remember — with this redesigned site, lots of images can show in way more quality than before. Just click them, and go Back afterwards to get back to this main page.]

The Mac OS X Finder also tracks which folders you have been in
The Mac OS X Finder also tracks which folders you have been in

2/ Where you have been — Your Mac also tracks where you have been, for your convenience should you wish to open a recently -used folder again without having to troll through your entire hard drive again. In Finder (ie, when you can see the word ‘Finder’ immediately beside your Apple menu) choose the Go menu, which offers a standard list of places you’re likely to go. But notice Recent Folders under this list – and also that it has a Clear Menu option at the bottom.

3/ What files are and how much space they’re using — Choose About This Mac from the Apple menu, then click on the More Info button, then on the Storage tab. Now you’ll see a very general graphical layout of the file allocation for each volume connected to your Mac. This representation lists Audio, Movies, Photos, Apps, Backups … and the somewhat mysterious ‘Other’.
This entry can account for a lot of space on the drive. It denotes files that don’t fit into the other five categories. This classification is based on Spotlight indexing.
Other files include the contents of the System and Library folders (because Spotlight won’t report on them by default), non-media documents such as text files and email archives, plug-ins and extensions, media files tucked away inside packages (because Spotlight can’t look inside packages – ie the contents of applications themselves), and other file types mysterious to Spotlight.

4/ Finder problems? Relaunch it — Sometimes the Finder locks up, or  configuration changes you have made require a Finder restart. You don’t actually have to restart your Mac to do this. Making sure the Finder is the frontmost app, hold down the shift key on your keyboard and open the Apple menu. Select ‘Force Quit Finder’ and the Finder will automatically relaunch.
Alternatively, you can select Force Quit and relaunch the Finder from the list of running apps. Press this keyboard combo: Command-Option-Escape to launch the Force Quit window. Note that the button in Force Quit is different for the Finder app – it says Relaunch instead. Click it … the Finder relaunches.
Thirdly, you can hold down the Option key and click-and-hold on the Finder app for a Relaunch option (and more).

5/ Whisk files into the Trash — While you’re in the Finder, you can zap files into the trash instantly with a  keyboard combo, saving all that clicking and dragging. It’s a little bit dangerous as they whisk into it without a moment’s hesitation, but it’s also pretty cool. Click and select a file (or click and drag over several files) then hold down the Command key on your keyboard, then press the Delete key at top-right of your keyboard.
The trash doesn’t empty, it just fills with the files you Command-delete. But … there’s a combo for instant emptying, too: Command Shift Delete (it only works when you are in the Finder).

Five Tip Friday ~ Tips for Mac OS X and the Sidebar in Finder windows


Your sidebar explained – and it's customisable
Your sidebar explained – and it’s customisable

Folders on the Mac:  those you see in the Finder and via Open and Save dialogue boxes have sidebars which I often describe as functioning ‘like a Dock for windows’ (the Dock being that strip of launch icons normally along the bottom of your screen, or maybe on the left or right depending on your Preferences).
If you can’t see this left-side Sidebar, click View from the Finder menu and select ‘Show Sidebar’. If you want to get rid of it, while it’s visible the same menu item becomes Hide Sidebar.

1/ Add a folder to the favourites section — If you have a personal folder you’d like to appear in the sidebar, just select it with your mouse and drag it to the Favorites (sic) section of the sidebar — and when you do, make sure to place it between a pair of existing Favorites folders rather than inside of of them.

2/ Remove a folder from your favourites — Right-click (or hold down the Control key on your keyboard and mouse/trackpad-click)  the folder you want to un-favourite, and select Remove from Sidebar.

3/ Customise the Sidebar items — Since Sidebar items are actually just shortcuts leading to real items (ie, like the Dock), in addition to key directories like your Applications and Movies folders, the sidebar can also display hard drives, DVDs, connected Internet servers and file ‘tags’ (which first appeared on OS X Mavericks), and other items.
To add or remove any of these items, click your desktop to make the Finder menu appear at the top of the screen, click the main Finder menu, select Preferences, click the Sidebar tab, then check or uncheck the various sidebar item options as you see fit.

4/ Rearrange your favourites — Just click, hold, and drag up or down to rearrange items in the ‘Favorites’ list of your sidebar. Make it work for you – that’s what your Mac is all about.

5/ Make the sidebar bigger, or smaller — Grab the sidebar’s right edge with your mouse and drag it one way to expand it, or the other to shrink it.