Tag Archives: trash

The Apocalypticon ~ Bad Chinese, data, crypto-creep, Police fraud, Chrome, Vaxxing, MMR, trash, Antarctic humans, Faceyuck, garlic, onions, sleep


Driving a car in 1909? Carry a gun — Life wasn’t easy for women in the early 20th century and race car driver and motorist Dorothy Levitt knew that for a fact, so published The Woman and the Car: A Chatty Little Handbook for all Women who Motor or Who Want to Motor in 1909. It tells women how to take care of themselves and their cars, and reminds them to always carry a gun.
‘Bad’ Chinese can’t use the train — China’s dystopian ‘social credit’ system penalises citizens found to have engaged in some type of misconduct by imposing a number of restrictions on their activities. This has already resulted in tens of millions of rejected attempts to purchase plane or train tickets. [All praise Xi Jinping.]
On data — Security researchers Bob Diachenko and Vinny Troia discovered an unprotected MongoDB database  belonging to an email verification service containing 150GB of detailed, plaintext marketing data, including hundreds of millions of unique email addresses.
Winnipeg police update their devices with fraudulent data — Winnipeg police have arrested a manager with the city for allegedly updating police radios with fraudulent software he got from a person considered to be a security threat by the US Department of Homeland Security. [Doh! But hey, he saved his department some money.]
Chrome meltdown — Google said this week that a Chrome zero-day the company patched last week was actually used together with a second one, a zero-day impacting the Microsoft Windows 7 operating system.
Artificial AI — Two-fifths of Europe’s AI startups do not use any AI programs in their products, according to a report that highlights the hype around the technology.
Crypto-wallets finally unlocked, but proved empty — The money was there, it was just locked away. At least that’s what the QuadrigaCX cryptocurrency exchange had been saying, before an auditor revealed it had finally accessed digital wallets set up by Quadriga’s late CEO Gerald Cotten, and that instead of holding US$137 million, the wallets were empty, drained in 2018. [Don’t invest in things you don’t understand.]

Trash talking — Gizmodo has reached out to a number of experts in geography, paleobiology, environmental science, engineering and more to figure out the absolute worst trash that humans produce. [I will stick with Donald Trump, but Xi Iinping, you’re up there.]
Microplastics host ocean-borne toxic bacteria — Plastic pollutants in the ocean serve as platforms for the growth of toxic bacteria, say scientists from the National University of Singapore (NUS). 
Human footprint surprisingly big in Antarctica — Antarctica is huge, stretching nearly 5,633km at its widest extent. Despite its enormous size, however, the frozen continent features a paltry amount of habitable space: a limited resource humans have claimed to the potential detriment of the local wildlife, as new research points out.
Nature strikes back! That’s the shared theme of these 10 eco-horror movies Gizmodo has compiled in honour of Garbage Week, all tales of terrible punishments that transpire when the environment lashes out against evil, wasteful, and destructive humans.
Deflecting asteroids … not easy! According to new asteroid collision models designed by scientists at Johns Hopkins University, deflecting a large rock headed for Earth will be harder than previously thought.
US Army reckons war robots won’t murder people [OK, two words: war robots.]

MMR does not increase autism risk — The measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine is not associated with an increased risk of autism even among kids who are at high risk because they have a sibling with the disorder, a Danish study suggests.
Adult son of anti-vaccination parents furious after contracting measles —Joshua Nerius of Chicago, Illinois, had no idea he wasn’t vaccinated until he came down with the highly contagious disease in 2016. But Facebook reckons it’s working on dealing with anti-vax poropganda.

Faceyuck — All the bad press about Facebook might be catching up to the company. New numbers from Edison Research show an an estimated 15 million fewer users in the United States compared to 2017, with the biggest drop is in the very desirable 12- to 34-year-old group. [Maybe Facebook should just rename itself ‘Faceplant’.]

Good news: The consumption of onions and garlic is associated with lower colorectal cancer risk, according to researchers in China. [Presumably, these researchers are allowed to get the train.]
And broken DNA is repaired while you sleep — Scientists have discovered that broken DNA builds up in brain cells in the daytime and repair work reverses the damage only during sleep. For an act so universal, sleep has enormous benefits: it restores the body and helps learning and memory. In the calm hours of sleep, the repair mechanisms at a neuron level have a chance to get on top of the job. 

Five Tip Friday ~ Images, instant video, locked images in the trash, on SD cards


iClShLib

1/ How to create an iCloud Shared Album — iCloud Photo Library stores every photo and video you make, then keeps them up to date on all your OS X and iOS devices. Any edits you make are automatically updated everywhere. And iCloud Photo Sharing makes it easy to share those photos and videos with others – you know, you have a batch of photos, you want Aunt Mary to see them, but she lives in Glasgow and you line in Porirua ….
— Open the Photos app on your Mac, iPhone, or iPad and select one or more photos.
— Click on the Share Icon, then choose iCloud Photo Sharing.
A new window will pop up. You can add a caption or comment to the photos.
— Click New Shared Album. (If you’re setting up your Shared Album in iOS, you’ll tap Shared Album first, and then New Shared Album.)
— Name your iCloud Shared Album.
Now you can invite the folks you wish to share it with by using the box in the middle. You can invite people via their email address or iMessages number, or select names from your Contacts list.
When the info is all filled out, click Create, and you’re good to go. You can continue to add photos to your Shared Album, and they’ll beavailable to those you invited when you created the album (from Apple World Today).

2/ Use a keyboard shortcut for Display Mirroring — There’s a keyboard shortcut you should learn—Command-F1. This combo turns display mirroring off and on, so if you need to temporarily see your Dock or your open windows on both displays, it’ll let you do that. This is just a quick way to, well, mirror the functionality of System Preferences>Displays>Arrangement>Mirror Displays.
To put things back the way you had them, press Command-F1 again.
(f this doesn’t seem to be working for you, check out your options at System Preferences>Keyboard, under the Keyboard tab. There’s a checkbox there for Use all F1, F2, etc. keys as standard function keys  and if that’s on, the keyboard shortcut will be Function-Command-F1 instead.)

3/ How to delete locked images in Image Capture — Sometimes when you’ve mounted a memory card through a Mac’s SD Card slot or an external card reader, but the card’s tiny lock switch has been flipped on, often by mistake.
Eject the card, then flip the switch to the unlocked position, then mount again. The locks should be gone. If they remain, the card may be damaged. SD cards are tiny computers that manage the wear pattern on what is effectively an SSD. If the on-board chip determines it can’t write data, the only indication would be these locks in Image Capture.
You can copy all the media off and try reformatting in a camera, but if that fails, the card has gone bad.

4/ Record video directly into iMovie in OS X — Start a new project and open the Import window by clicking the Import button in the toolbar. (If you don’t see the Import button, click the Media button in the toolbar, and then click the Import button. If the Image Capture, Photos, or iPhoto window appears, close the window.
In the Cameras section of the Import window sidebar, select the built-in camera. A live video image from the camera appears in the Import window. To specify the event you want to record into, do one of the following:
Choose an existing event — click the Import to pop-up menu at the top of the Import window and choose the event.
Create a new event — Click the Import to pop-up menu, choose New Event, type a name for the new event, and click OK.
Choose the open project — Click the Import to pop-up menu and choose Project Media.
To start recording from the selected camera, click the Record button below the live video image. A new clip is created for each recording. You can repeat this process as many times as necessary. To stop recording, click the Record button again. To end the recording session and return to the iMovie main window, click the Close button.

5/ Deleting locked images from Trash — This one’s a bit complicated. The file permissions associated with trash can get out of whack, making it impossible for OS X to write new files to the Trash folder, but OS X doesn’t have a friendly way to repair it, even though your Mac knows enough that it can’t write to the folder.
The underlying Unix directory for files en route to deletion isn’t global but is located in each user’s home directory. This is transparent to you when using OS X unless the permissions for the directory become messed up. In that case, because OS X can’t move the items you want to delete into this temporary location, you’re prompted to delete files or folders immediately. (You’ll see this warning when deleting files from mounted fileservers, too, for the same reason.)
You can solve this via the Terminal although you need to be even more careful than usual in entering a command there, as you could delete other files if you don’t copy and paste (or, type in) the exact sequence—it won’t just fail, but could delete parts of your drive.
So copy and paste!
With that warning in mind, follow these steps when logged into your account, which has to have administrative privileges for this to work:
Launch Application > Terminal.
At the command prompt type (or, preferably, copy and paste):
sudo rm -ri ~/.Trash
Press the Return key on your keyboard..
You should first be prompted for your account’s password; enter it, and press Return.
You should next be prompted to remove any files and folders in the .Trash folder, followed by the .Trash folder itself. Type yes and return at each prompt. (This is a great place to notice if you’ve entered anything incorrectly above, too, and to press Control-C to halt the removal if you have.)
Now Log out of your OS X account ( > Log Out [user name], which closes all programs) and log back in. The problem should be solved, as OS X will create a new .Trash folder with the correct permissions.
If you continue to have problems, you may have permissions problems on mounted drives. You can repeat the above operation for each volume, which contains a hidden top-level .Trashes folder with separate folders for each user in OS X.
In step 3, instead of ~/.Trash, you use each volume’s name instead. In OS X, you can type df -H to find the names of each volume, which are listed under a Mounted On column in form /Volumes/ plus the drive’s name.
Unix doesn’t recognise spaces in names as part of the name unless they’re handled carefully, by putting a backslash in front of them, such as /Volumes/My\ Main\ Backup\ Drive. You can avoid having to do this formatting by dragging the volume in question into the Terminal window after entering the command for step 2:
Type: sudo rm -ri plus a space (tap the spacebar).
Drag the volume onto the Terminal window, and it inserts the properly formatted volume name.
Now press Delete to remove a space after the drive’s name that’s automatically inserted, and add /.Trashes
Now log out of your account and back in, and you should have your Trash folder restored to normal. (From Macworld.)

Five Tip Friday ~ Mac tips for better Finder work


Recent Items offers fast, easy, always-available access to your last-used documents and apps
Recent Items offers fast, easy, always-available access to your last-used documents and apps

1/ Recent items — One of my favourite general Mac Finder features is the Recent Items folder, which lists the last few apps and the last few documents you opened. It’s in the Apple menu so you can use the feature no matter what you are doing. Within apps, under the File menu, there’s also an Open Recent option – this is handy as you can see the last few documents you had open in that particular app.
Security — remember, if you can see these things, so can anyone else. Luckily you can clear these – select Apple Menu>Recent Items and choose Clear Menu from the bottom. In apps, the Open Recent also gives you the option to clear this if you want to delete the easy-open of files you have been working with/looking at.
[Remember — with this redesigned site, lots of images can show in way more quality than before. Just click them, and go Back afterwards to get back to this main page.]

The Mac OS X Finder also tracks which folders you have been in
The Mac OS X Finder also tracks which folders you have been in

2/ Where you have been — Your Mac also tracks where you have been, for your convenience should you wish to open a recently -used folder again without having to troll through your entire hard drive again. In Finder (ie, when you can see the word ‘Finder’ immediately beside your Apple menu) choose the Go menu, which offers a standard list of places you’re likely to go. But notice Recent Folders under this list – and also that it has a Clear Menu option at the bottom.

3/ What files are and how much space they’re using — Choose About This Mac from the Apple menu, then click on the More Info button, then on the Storage tab. Now you’ll see a very general graphical layout of the file allocation for each volume connected to your Mac. This representation lists Audio, Movies, Photos, Apps, Backups … and the somewhat mysterious ‘Other’.
This entry can account for a lot of space on the drive. It denotes files that don’t fit into the other five categories. This classification is based on Spotlight indexing.
Other files include the contents of the System and Library folders (because Spotlight won’t report on them by default), non-media documents such as text files and email archives, plug-ins and extensions, media files tucked away inside packages (because Spotlight can’t look inside packages – ie the contents of applications themselves), and other file types mysterious to Spotlight.

4/ Finder problems? Relaunch it — Sometimes the Finder locks up, or  configuration changes you have made require a Finder restart. You don’t actually have to restart your Mac to do this. Making sure the Finder is the frontmost app, hold down the shift key on your keyboard and open the Apple menu. Select ‘Force Quit Finder’ and the Finder will automatically relaunch.
Alternatively, you can select Force Quit and relaunch the Finder from the list of running apps. Press this keyboard combo: Command-Option-Escape to launch the Force Quit window. Note that the button in Force Quit is different for the Finder app – it says Relaunch instead. Click it … the Finder relaunches.
Thirdly, you can hold down the Option key and click-and-hold on the Finder app for a Relaunch option (and more).

5/ Whisk files into the Trash — While you’re in the Finder, you can zap files into the trash instantly with a  keyboard combo, saving all that clicking and dragging. It’s a little bit dangerous as they whisk into it without a moment’s hesitation, but it’s also pretty cool. Click and select a file (or click and drag over several files) then hold down the Command key on your keyboard, then press the Delete key at top-right of your keyboard.
The trash doesn’t empty, it just fills with the files you Command-delete. But … there’s a combo for instant emptying, too: Command Shift Delete (it only works when you are in the Finder).