Tag Archives: tabs

Five Tip Friday ~ Safari in macOS


1/ How to clear your Safari browsing history in macOS Sierra — You can remove all records that macOS Sierra’s Safari keeps of where you’ve browsed during a period of time you want. If your Mac and your other devices have Safari turned on to sync in iCloud preferences, your browsing history is removed from all of those devices.
Clearing your browsing history in Safari doesn’t clear any browsing histories kept independently by websites you visited. Choose History > Clear History, click the pop-up menu, then choose how far back you want your browsing history cleared.
When you clear your history, Safari removes all the data it saves as a result of your browsing, including the history of webpages you visited, the back and forward list for open webpages, Top Sites that aren’t marked as permanent, your frequently visited site list, recent searches, and more. You will need to log into services like Facebook again … so make sure you really want to remove all this data before you clear your Safari history.

2/ Bookmark folders — If you’re using Safari’s Favorites Bar (which can be revealed by choosing View > Show Favorites Bar from the program’s menus at the top), there are a few neat things you can do with folders full of bookmarks (Bookmarks menu, Add Bookmarks Folder). You can tell what bookmarks in the Favourites Bar are folders because of those tiny downward-caret-arrow things to the right of each one (above). Apple calls these Disclosure Triangles because clicking them always reveals things. If you click on one, you’ll note the Open in New Tabs option.
Choose that, and obviously the bookmarks within that folder will open in their own tabs, which is a fast way to launch a whole bunch of sites at once. If, however, you hold down the Option key on your keyboard before you click there, Open in New Tabs switches to Replace Tabs. This means any tabs you had in your existing Safari window will vanish and be replaced by the ones in the folder you chose. Neat!

3/ For an even faster way to do either of those things — Use the Command key or the Option key. If you hold down Command and click on any toolbar bookmarks folder, it’ll open the sites within in new tabs; hold down Option and click one, and Safari will replace your existing tabs like we just discussed.

4/ Set your folders to automatically replace existing ones with just a click — To configure that, right- or Control-click on the folder and pick Automatically Replace Tabs from the contextual menu.
That will add a little square next to the folder in your toolbar, which will mean a single click will replace all of your existing tabs with the ones in that folder. (Be careful about doing that accidentally. If that happens, there are ways to recover your lost tabs.)

5/ Some of this functionality is available from the bookmarks sidebar if you prefer that view — For example, you can right- or Control-click on folders from there to pick Open in New Tabs. Holding down the Option key will switch that to Replace Tabs, as it does in the toolbar. [These last four tips came from The Mac Observer, which has more pictures.] 

Five Tip Friday ~ Tidiness tips for macOS


1/ Minimise apps into their icons — You can click the yellow pill button in the upper left corner of a window to minimize an app’s window into the Dock in macOS Sierra, but if you minimize a lot of windows, the right side of the Dock quickly becomes cluttered.
The solution is to minimise windows into their app icons.
Open System Preferences from the Apple menu and choose Dock. Check the box next to ‘Minimize windows into application icon’ (shown above). Now they minimise down into the originating app’s icon – click-and-hold on that in the Dock to see your files (below).


If you have a lot of minimized app windows, and have trouble finding what you’re looking for, control-click (hold down the Control key on your keyboard and click) the app icon to reveal a list of that apps minimized windows. Choose an item from the list and it will open.

2/ Group windows by application in macOS Sierra — macOS Sierra introduced system wide tabs for most (but not all) apps, allowing you to merge multiple windows into a single window or separate merged windows.
With two or more windows of a supported app open, go to the Windows menu in the Finder and choose ‘Merge All Windows.’ All windows of the same app will be grouped into a single window. Each file you have open will appear as a tab inside the single window.
To separate the merged windows into standalone windows of their own, select the merged window to make it active. Go to the Windows and click the ‘Move Tab to New Window’ option. Click it to move the selected tab to a separate window.
This won’t separate all tabs into windows of their own, but separate the current tab to its own window. All remaining tabs will remain grouped into a single window unless you separate them one at a time.
Click the close button on a merged window, and it will close all tabs you have open in it.

3/ Move multiple Events between Calendars — If you’ve got several events you need to move to a different calendar, change to month view by pressing Command-3 or click on the Month option in Calendar’s toolbar or at top-centre of Calendar.
Now find the events you’d like to move, hold down Command on your keyboard and click on each one to select them all in turn.
When your events are all highlighted, right- or Control-click on any one of them. From the contextual menu that appears, choose the ‘Calendar’ option and pick the one you’d like to move your selected events to. Simple.

4/ Multiple ways to move items to Trash — Trash is a To put item(s) in the Trash, once can simply drag the item(s) to the Trash icon, or move highlighted file(s) to the Trash using the keyboard combo Command-Delete. If you realize you made a mistake, you can Undo the operation by choosing File > Undo, or the keyboard combo Command-Z.
If you’d like to delete highlighted items immediately, you can hold down Option and select File > Delete Immediately…. Alternately, you can use keyboard combo Command-Option-Delete. Either way, you’ll received a confirmation dialogue that the operation is permanent and can’t be undone.

5/ Empty stubborn Trash items — ToIf there are files in the Trash, which you can confirm visually because you’ll see items in the Trash, you can empty it by either choosing Finder > Empty Trash…, or using keyboard combo Shift-Cmd-Delete. You’ll be presented with a confirmation dialog asking if you’re sure. You can also hold down Option and select Finder > Empty Trash, or use keyboard combo Shift-Option-Command-Delete. Notice that since there isn’t a trailing ellipsis after the choice, it will be done immediately without a confirmation dialogue. [If this still doesnt work, you need Terminal, as detailed here.]

Five Tip Friday ~ Universal Clipboard, Markup, and Safari tips for Mac


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1/ Set up and use Universal Clipboard — The new Universal Clipboard feature in macOS Sierra and iOS 10 allows you to copy content, including text, images, photos and video from one Apple device and paste it in another. For example, you can browse a recipe on your Mac and paste the ingredients right to the grocery list on your iPhone. In theory, all you have to do is make sure all your Mac and iOS devices are on the same Wi-Fi network and that Bluetooth is enabled on your iPhone and/or iPad. Copy on one, choose Paste on the other … but if you can’t make this work (and there can be a lag between the cCopy then the ability to Paste), try signing out of iCloud on all of your devices, and then signing back in.

2/ Use Markup in macOS Sierra Photos — If you’re editing your images within Photos, you can apply filters, remove red-eye, crop things and so on. But macOS Sierra added Markup to Photos, which lets you add text boxes, shapes or drawings to your images.
Select the picture you’d like to annotate, then click the edit button in the toolbar (it looks like a set of sliders). In edit mode, you’ll see a list of tools along the side. Click on Extensions and the Markup option appears. Click this and you can add circles or stars around people, insert text boxes and more.

3/ Reopen recently used tabs in Safari — Launch Safari for Mac and in the Mac’s menu bar for Safari, and the obvious way is to click History. From the list of options with the History menu item, slide down to select Recently Closed. Hovering over this menu item produces a new contextual menu that shows all recently-closed Safari tabs. Select the item that you wish to reopen and click on it. You probably – hopefully! – knew that, but there’s a faster way to do it:

4/ Reopen recently used tabs in Safari (2) —To the right hand side of any open tab in Safari there is a Plus(+) icon. Clicking this opens a new Safari tab window. However, if you right-click (or hold down the Control key on your keyboard and normal-click) on the Plus(+) icon, a new menu appears that shows all recently-closed tabs. Select one to launch it.

5/ Turn Flash off for sites except for some — Flash sucks – it’s a resource hog, can allow malware in and it’s generally unpopular for good reason. So let’s take control of it. First, open any sites where you know you still need to use Flash (which allows those little web animations to play.) There are alternatives to Flash, and many sites including YouTube, have switched to the much better, higher resolution and faster HTML5. But if you’re stuck with needing some sites that still use Flash, read on.
On your Mac, open Preferences>Security>Plug-in Settings… and choose Adobe Flash Player. Set ‘When visiting other websites’ to Off to cause all other servers to send you HTML 5 instead (this is faster, more secure) content when available. But you can choose from among your open sites to give them permission to use the Flash plug-in and Safari will remember your choice for your next visit.

Five Tip Friday ~ Safari on Mac


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The next OS for Mac (macOS 10.12 Sierra) is in development and some public and developer testers already have it  – but it won’t officially ship till (probably) September, so there’s still lots to learn about OS 10.11. Here are some tips for Safari.
I’ve said this many times, but unless you’re using tabbed browsing for your searches and other tasks in Safari, you’re not getting the best from your online experience. I’m not going to go through that again here, but here’s a nice easy How To to get you up and running if you’re not using this yet.

1/ Close other tabs — When you’ve got multiple tabs open, click on the File menu and find Close Tab – now hold down the Option key on your keyboard: Close Tab switches to Close Other Tabs. If you’ve opened up lots of links in tabs and just want to get rid of everything except the tab you’re currently viewing, this does it in one go. (The keyboard shortcut for this action is Option-Command-W– Command W being the standard and ubiquitous Close Window command).
You can also hold down the Option on your keyboard and click on the ‘x that appears on your tab (the little Close button each tab has) when you hover over it. A little tooltip will show up when you do so, warning you of what’s about to happen.

2/ Undo the closing action — If you’re playing around and accidentally close a tab, remember you can press Command-Z (Edit > Undo Close Tab – actually, XCommand Z is the universal and ubiquitous – and lifesaving, sometimes – Undo Last Action command and well worth learning anyway, as it works almost everywhere) to bring it back.

PinnedTab3/ Pinning sites — There are several ways to save sites you use a lot: add to favourites, bookmarking … but El Capitan’s Safari added ‘site pinning’. Pinning a site is easy – choose Pin Tab from the Window menu to move it’s button, while resizing it smaller, to the left side of your Favourites bar, or click on a tab’s title and just drag it all the way to the left of the tab. You can also hold down the Control key ion your keyboard (it may be labelled ‘Ctrl’) and click a tab, then choose Pin Tab from the pop-out menu.
The tab will become a small square on the left side of the tab bar, as in the thumbnail on the left here: it just shows a site icon. Pinned tabs remain open when you close and reopen Safari, and the sites in them run in the background, so you’ll hear sounds such as message alerts or videos running if they’re on that site.

4/ Safari keyboard shortcuts — Some of Safari’s keyboard shortcuts changed for El Capitan. Previously, [Command]+1, [Command]+2 and so on opened bookmarks from corresponding positions in the Favorites Bar; now these shortcuts switch between tabs you have open, including the pinned ones.
These shortcut actions can be reversed by turning off ‘Use [Command]-1 through [Command]-9 to switch tabs’ in Safari>Preferences>Tabs.

5/ Shutting things up — Some sites (bloody Macworld!) have videos that auto launch and noisily run even when they are in tabs that aren’t expanded (the ones you’re viewing the contents of). Now, Safari displays a speaker icon in the browser bar to mute any audio, as well as in the affected tab, letting you pick which tab to silence. Just click it.