Tag Archives: super-laser

Futurology ~ 10 trillion frames, driverless military, digital acting, super-laser, Viking ship, sponge on steroids


Using ground-penetrating radar, archaeologists in Norway have discovered an ancient Viking ship (outlined in green) buried just 50cm beneath the surface of a farmer’s field.

World’s fastest camera shoots 10 trillion frames a second — For the new imaging technique, the team started with compressed ultrafast photography (CUP), a method that it is capable of 100 billion fps. That’s nothing to scoff at by itself, but it’s still not fast enough to really capture what’s going on with ultrafast laser pulses, which occur on the scale of femtoseconds. A femtosecond, for reference, is one quadrillionth of a second.
So the team built on that technology by combining a femtosecond streak camera and a static camera, and running it through a data acquisition technique known as Radon transformation. This advanced system was dubbed T-CUP.
~ I think Zeno ought to step in here. 

The US Army is getting ready to drive into war in driverless trucks — In a year, its ‘Leader-Follower’ technology will enable convoys of autonomous vehicles to follow behind one vehicle driven by a human. It’s a direct response to the improvised explosive devices that caused nearly half the casualties in Iraq and Afghanistan.
~ Surely you just blow up the first truck then? Then they all stop, and let the plundering begin.. The next step is complete soldier-less wars.

Actors are digitally preserving themselves to continue their careers beyond the grave — From Carrie Fisher in Rogue One: A Star Wars Story to Paul Walker in the Fast & Furious movies, dead and magically “de-aged” actors are appearing more frequently on movie screens. Sometimes they even appear on stage: next year, an Amy Winehouse hologram will be going on tour to raise money for a charity established in the late singer’s memory. Some actors and movie studios are buckling down and preparing for an inevitable future when using scanning technology to preserve 3-D digital replicas of performers is routine. Just because your star is inconveniently dead doesn’t mean your generation-spanning blockbuster franchise can’t continue to rake in the dough.
~ So go image yourselves before the botox, filler and plastic surgery looks too obvious. 

Powerful lasers changing labs — The winners of this year’s Nobel Prize in Physics didn’t just make discoveries. Their revolutionary work turned powerful lasers into ubiquitous lab tools. The tennis-court sized Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator, or BELLA, uses one of the Nobel-winning methods to create one of the most powerful laser pulses on Earth.
~ BELLA is chirped pulse amplification on steroids. So you’d hope their aim is pretty good.

Antarctic ice making weird noises — Using special instruments, scientists have discovered weird sounds at the bottom of the world. The noise is actually vibrating ice, caused by the wind blowing across snow dunes, according to a new study. It’s kind of like you’re blowing a flute, constantly, on the ice shelf,” study lead author Julien Chaput, a geophysicist and mathematician at Colorado State University, said in a statement. Another scientist, glaciologist Douglas MacAyeal of the University of Chicago, likened the sounds to the buzz of thousands of cicadas. The sounds are too low in frequency to be heard by human ears unless sped up by the monitoring equipment.
~ Sounds cool.

Ancient Viking ship just metres from a motorway — Using ground-penetrating radar, archaeologists in Norway have discovered an ancient Viking ship buried just 50cm beneath the surface of a farmer’s field. The 20m-long ship, deliberately buried during a funeral ritual, appears surprisingly intact – and it could contain the skeletal remains of a high-ranking Viking warrior.
~ I guess it’s not all that surprising since it’s near the the large and fully intact Jelle burial mound.

Ancient sea sponge on steroids — Scientists from the University of California, Riverside, are claiming to have discovered the oldest known animal fossil – an ancient sea sponge that emerged between 660 million and 635 million years ago.
~ Unfair advantage? 

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Futurology ~ Our ancient meteors, Sagan knew, super-laser, Australian biometric passport, 3D-printed human skin, seawater lamp, coffee genetics


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466-million-year-old meteors raining down on Earth — When the solar system was in its rebellious stage about 466 million years ago, two massive asteroids collided in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter, sending tiny pieces of shrapnel flying all over the solar system.
After examining bits of crystals that fell to Earth just before the collision, an international team of scientists has learned that space rocks that only enter our atmosphere rarely now were much more prevalent back in the day. And stuff from that big breakup is still raining down on us.
~ So we’re still seeing the effects of an event that took place almost 500 million years ago.

 In 1995, Carl Sagan predicted manufacturing jobs gone & no control over our political lives — Did Carl Sagan really warn about a time in the future when manufacturing jobs would slip away, when the average person would have virtually no control over their political lives, and when we would all cling to superstitions? Yes, Sagan did. And plenty of people are worried that Carl was talking about our era. The passage comes from Sagan’s book Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark, first published in 1995.
~ Go him. I just wish he’d been wrong. 

Super-powerful laser — A Czech and British research team says their ‘super laser’ is capable of an average power output of over 1000 watts, making it ‘10 times as powerful‘ as other lasers of its type.
~ There have been more powerful, but that’s peak pulses. This has a powerful average output, which is the important bit. Bzzt. 

Australian biometric passports — Australia has begun the search for technology companies that could provide biometric systems, such as facial, iris and fingerprint recognition for border control. Head of border security John Coyne said it could be a “world first.” But critics have questioned the privacy implications of such a system.
~ Surely it’s not that hard to figure out who desperately needs asylum and safety and therefore should be turned back? 

Spanish scientists developed a prototype 3D printer capable of printing functional human skin — It could be used for transplant patients, as well as an ethical alternative to animal testing. The so-called bioprinter uses special ‘ink’ consisting of human cells and other biological components to reproduce the natural structure of the skin, including the external epidermis and the deeper dermis layer.
~ Surely it could add tattoos?

Lamp glows 80 hours on seawater — There are plenty of legitimate reasons to prepare for the end of civilisation as we know it (and now many of them have Trump in the title), and if the world’s supply of batteries ever runs out, you’ll be glad you had this emergency LED lamp tucked away in your doomsday shelter.
Hitachi Maxell’s Mizusion lamp for goes for about three days on a mix of salt and water. The ingredients work alongside oxygen in the air and a replaceable magnesium ‘power bar’ to create positive and negative electrodes, which in turn generates electricity.
~ Just make sure you have a seaside apocalypse.

Coffee’s gene-fueled future — This just drew nearer, now that scientists have sequenced the genome of the Coffea arabica coffee plant – the species that makes up the vast majority of global production – and made the data public. That means the world is in for a coffee renaissance, as breeders use the information to develop new plant varieties.
~ Banana with that?