Tag Archives: sunscreen

The Apocalypticon ~ Chinese totalitarianism, animal antics, sunscreen, Molotov’d troll, Chernobyl power, oyster shells, mattock


Interpol President Meng Hongwei has resigned after being detained by Chinese authorities who accuse him of corruption. The shocking turnabout comes days after Meng’s wife said the career police officer had disappeared after he left France to visit his native China. China’s Public Security Minister Zhao Kezhi said on Monday that Meng is being investigated for allegations of bribery — charges that he did not describe in detail. Zhao said his ministry supports the inquiry; he also spoke of the importance of loyalty to the Communist Party’s ideals [my italics].
Apple denies ‘wild’ Bloomberg allegations about Chinese surveillance hardware — Apple (and Amazon) quickly and fiercely refuted claims that rice-grain-sized hardware had been introduced to their server hardware. Another strongly-worded denial is available to read in full – this is one Apple wrote to members of Congress (as Reuters reported). The full letter is now online.

Dinosaurs to blame for us needing sunscreen — The idea is that the ancient ancestors of modern mammals (including humans) had to live underground or were exclusively nocturnal in order to to avoid being eaten by dinosaurs. Therefore, we did not evolve the so-called ‘photoreactivation DNA repair function’. Dang.
But who is to blame for us being overexposed to computer and device screens? Not these Kickstarter glasses! Scott Blew, an entrepreneur and engineer, recalled an article he’d recently read in WIRED about a new kind of film that blocked the light emitted from screens. He wondered if the same technology might work on a pair of glasses, to block the screens that seemed to be everywhere.
It does work (below). They tune out most televisions and some computers, but not the newer crop of smartphones like the just-released OLED-packing iPhones.

Animal antics: Polar bears eating whales — Just over a year ago, 150 polar bears amassed on a remote island off the north coast Siberia to devour a dead bowhead whale that had washed ashore. It was the largest swarm of polar bears ever recorded feasting on a stranded whale — but events such as this could become more common in a warmer world.
Gecko made multiple prank calls — The director of a seal hospital in Hawaii says she was deluged with a more than a dozen mysterious calls to her mobile phone. When she picked up, however, the line was silent.
To make the situation even stranger, the calls were apparently coming from inside the hospital. It turned out to be a rather active tiny gold dust day gecko ..

Molotov hits Russian troll factory — [I love that headline!] Russia’s most famous ‘troll factory,’ a building where Kremlin-financed posters waged a battle of words in the New Cold War, has been hit with a molotov cocktail. No one was injured in the attack.
Chernobyl is producing power again — though not the kind that triggered a nuclear meltdown 32 years ago. Ukraine is now turning to solar power, and in the process, making good use of land that won’t be habitable to humans for another 24,000 years. The modest one-megawatt plant, located just 100m from the infamous Chernobyl nuclear power plant, has been launched by Ukranian authorities. The photovoltaic cells of this €1 million (US$1.6 million) solar station take up four acres of land and produces enough energy to power about 2000 households. [Since no one can live there, it’s an ingenious use of the real estate.]

Now for some good news — Used oyster shells are helping save New York harbourOver 70 restaurants across New York City are tossing their oyster shells  into the city’s eroded harbour as part of Billion Oyster Project’s restaurant shell-collection program. The journey from trash to treasure begins after an oyster half shell is turned upside down and left on an icy tray. It joins hundreds of thousands of other half shells collected in blue bins and picked up (free of charge) from restaurants five days a week. They are trucked to Brooklyn’s Greenpoint neighbourhood and, once cured, they’re used to hatch live oysters which become part of New York harbour reclamation projects.

Excerpt from my forthcoming book: “One famous trope for surviving in zombie apocalypse is to carry a spade, because it is useful and because nobody immediately interprets a spade as a weapon, since it’s such a a common tool. But I prefer a mattock …”

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