Tag Archives: quantum-brains

Futurology ~ Asteroid water, Earth crust, quantum-brains, 3D-printed batteries, anti-malarial gold, truck-bot, Moore’s Lawless, predictions, 1200-year-old climate fix


Scientists in South Korea and the US have used 3D printing to manufacture batteries of various shapes and sizes

AKARI finds signs of water in asteroids — A Japanese research team has used the infrared camera aboard the AKARI satellite to detect the presence of hydrated materials inside C-type asteroids.  Using the infrared camera of the AKARI satellite, a Japanese research team has detected the existence of water in the form of hydrated minerals in a number of asteroids. They reported their findings in the Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan.
~ Makes the concept of interstellar life a little more possible. 

A huge part of Earth’s crust is missing, and now scientists may know why — The Grand Canyon is a gigantic geological library, with rocky layers that tell much of the story of Earth’s history. Curiously though, a sizeable layer representing anywhere from 250 million years to 1.2 billion years is missing. Known as the Great Unconformity, this massive temporal gap can be found not just in this famous crevasse, but in places all over the world. Using multiple lines of evidence, an international team of geoscientists reckons the thief was Snowball Earth, a hypothesised time when much, if not all, of the planet was covered in ice.
~ Cold comfort.

Quantum-computing brains — The unprecedented power of brain suggests that it may process information quantum-mechanically. Pavlo Mikheenko, a superconductivity researcher at the University of Oslo, has published a paper (PDF at that link) in the Journal of Superconductivity and Novel Magnetism suggesting that microtubule structures in pig neurons exhibit evidence of superconductivity that could represent a mechanism for quantum computing performed by the brain to achieve the brain’s phenomenal information processing power.
~ This was predicted as a possibility in 1972; now there may be proof. 

Breaking the battery mould with 3D printing — Scientists in South Korea and the US have used 3D printing to manufacture batteries of various shapes and sizes. Flexible, wireless electronic devices are rapidly emerging, and many have gone on to become commercial products. However, the batteries contained in these devices are either spherical or rectangular structures, which results in inefficient use of space. Enter 3D printers … scientists use an electrospinning process to uniformly coat electrochemically-active polyaniline.
~ Batteries can thus be printed for small-scale wearable electronic devices.

Anti-malarial drug breakthrough — A team of researchers from the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) and Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore, has developed a class of gold-containing molecules that impair the malaria parasite’s metabolic function, leading to parasite death. Their findings are published in the journal Dalton Transactions.
~ Malaria has been developing drug resistance at a frightening rate. 

Aussie train may be world’s biggest robot — Mining corporation Rio Tinto says that an autonomous rail system called AutoHaul that it’s been developing in the remote Pilbara region of Australia for several years is now entirely operational, an accomplishment the company says makes the system the “world’s largest robot.”
~ They have the power and money to delete jobs thanks to voracious mining. Er, yay? 

Chip makers are circumventing Moore’s Law — Silicon’s time may have come.
~ Death Valley …

Pundits predict — What’s coming In 2019? Global thinkers make big, bold predictions in NPR.
~ Some of them are just scary. 

Climate change is affecting Peru, but there’s a 1200-year-old fix — Instead of looking for modern solutions to improve access to water, the villagers turned to an old one: centuries-old hydraulic systems that dot the Nor Yauyos Cochas Landscape Reserve, a state-protected natural area seven hours east of Lima. These ancient systems have been used to help irrigate the reserve’s pastures and provide nutrient-rich soil for hundreds of years.
~ Ancient smarts.

Advertisements