Tag Archives: Portrait mode

Portrait mode, Titanfall Assault, Ristar, AirPlay 2, Wicked Brainstorm allows brainstorming within Messages


Apple’s Portrait Mode in iPhone 7 Plus and iOS 11 exits beta, allows effect to be turned off after the fact — In the latest iOS 11 beta, Apple has taken the Portrait Mode camera setting out of beta, and has altered how the camera roll handles the pictures to allow for the effect to be removed from a picture using it at any time.

Titanfall: Assault real-time strategy title lands on iPhone, Sega Forever drive expands with Ristar — Two major titles have arrived on iPhone and iPad as free-to-play titles this week, with Nexon’s Titanfall: Assault introducing real time strategy to the battlefield-based franchise, while Ristar has been ported to iOS a full 22 years after its first release on the Sega Genesis.

Watch: AirPlay 2 delivers speaker integration with HomeKit, Siri support, more — When iOS 11 launches this fall, Apple will roll out a revamped version of its AirPlay protocol featuring speaker support for HomeKit, multi-room audio, shared up-next playlists, Siri integration and more, as you can see in the video at this link.

Wicked Brainstorm lets you brainstorm up a storm in iOS Message — It can be very handy to be able to brainstorm with folks. However, it hasn’t been practical using Messages on your iPhone or iPad.
Now it is, thanks to Wicked Brainstorm. Before using the app, brainstorming buddies would see all ideas mixed in with every other text message. With Wicked Brainstorm, those ideas are gathered together, yet still kept within Messages. When you’re done, you can turn the brainstormed list into a checklist and even vote as a group on the best ideas. It’s a free app, too.

 

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Five Tip Friday ~ iOS Photo markup, Portrait mode, zoom, 3D touch


markup

1/ Quickly mark up Photos on iPhone — The stock Photos app in iOS has a great tool for drawing perfect geometric figures on your photos. With Photos you can draw shapes freehand, and the software can determine what shape you are trying to draw and, at the lower part of the screen, offer two options: your original shape or what the photo app thinks you are trying to draw.
Access the markup options by tapping on the three lines with circles located at the bottom of the photo. Then tap on the circle with the three dots and choose Markup.
At the bottom there are options for colour selection, and below that four options: drawing a shape, lens magnification, overlaying text, and undo.
Choose the colour you want – the drawing tool should be selected and in blue. If not, tap on the drawing tool which looks like a marker drawing a line. Now draw the shape on the photo. If you draw a shape closely resembling something the app recognizes, then, at the bottom, you will be given two choices: your drawing or a well-defined shape the app thinks you are trying to draw.
If you tap on the box to the right, choosing the shape the app suggests, you will have a perfectly formed shape with handles to resize or shape it further. You can press on the shape and move it to place it somewhere different on the photo. When you are finished, simply tap on an open space on the photo. If you like what has been done with the photo, tap “done”; otherwise tap “cancel.”

2/ Portrait mode in iOS 10.1 on iPhone 7 Plus — iPhone 7 Plus can utilise its Portrait mode, creating an effect known as bokeh where the background behind a subject is blurred automatically. Officially it’s still in beta but you can get some pretty decent results out of it.
Swipe across the photo modes to Portrait, then frame your shot. Your iPhone will tell you if you need to move further away or find more light.
Keep your composition as simple as possible, with your subject (living or inanimate) as clearly defined as possible to avoid blurring the wrong thing. Experiment with exposure levels by tapping on the screen then dragging up or down on the sun icon. This will make things brighter or darker.

3/ Digital zoom — If your phone doesn’t have a second physical lens for zooming, digital zoom is an option too, but this is inferior since it just enlarges and crops the photo. If you do want to use it, tap and hold on the zoom button then drag left or right. Just don’t expect super sharp results.

4/ Get up close with optical zoom — Zooming in with optical zoom on the iPhone 7 Plus, which has two lenses, is easy: tap the 1x button above the shutter button and hey presto, you’re twice as close to your subject.
Keeping your phone steady is really important, but this model of iPhone is actually having its lens move so it’s a sharp, details zoom rather than the artificial result all the other iPhones get, as above.

5/ 3D touch shortcuts — Since iPhone 6s, pressing harder on your screen gives you extra commands and abilities (this does not work on iPhone 6 and any iPhone before that).
Here are some good ones to learn:
When downloading an app, you’ll see its icon appear as a timer on the home screen. To prioritise a download, and put it to the front of the queue of all the apps currently being installed, 3D Touch (i.e., press harder on) the icon and choose Prioritize Download.
One of the key uses for 3D Touch is to expand notifications and get more details without having to actually open them – if you do this on an Uber alert, you’ll get information on the driver’s current location, plus the option to send a message.
The iOS Control Center is packed with 3D Touch shortcuts just waiting to be discovered and used, including one for the Flashlight icon, which lets you choose between three different levels of intensity for the light: low, medium, and high.
Do a hard press anywhere on the iOS keyboard and it grays out, which means you can then move your finger to adjust the position of the cursor in the text.
A shortlist of contacts you frequently communicate with appears with a 3D Touch on the Phone app icon.
With a light tap on a link in Safari you can get a preview of the page without actually navigating there. It’s one of the “peek and pop” uses of 3D Touch.

Want more? Check out this Gizmodo story.

Portrait mode, lens firm refutes cuts, NYT gone from China, iOS 10 adoption, Instagram updated for iPhone 7


bokeh

Apple’s latest iPhone 7 Plus commercial showcases dual-lens ‘Portrait’ photo mode — Apple on Saturday published a new ad highlighting Portrait mode, an iPhone 7 Plus exclusive feature that seamlessly blends image data from the handset’s dual cameras to create artificial bokeh.
The hardware-specific function uses iPhone 7 Plus’ wide angle and telephoto lenses, complex computer vision algorithms and depth mapping to create a series of image layers. With input from the user, the mode is able to sharpen certain layers, like those with a subject, and selectively unfocus others using a custom blur technique. The result is a creamy, yet natural, scene rendition.

Apple camera lens manufacturer posts significant profit, shedding doubt on iPhone order cuts — iPhone 7 camera module manufacturer Largan Precision has posted its best financial report in 14 months, specifically citing strong orders from Apple.

Apple removes the New York Times app in China following government request — Over the holidays, Apple removed the New York Times mobile apps, both the English-language version and the Chinese-language version, from the App Store in China. The Times originally reported that its apps were removed on December 23, and Apple confirmed it on Thursday, citing a request from Chinese authorities. [Happy New Year.]

iOS 10 Adoption Hits 76% After 4 Months, Slightly Outpacing iOS 9 — iOS 10 is now installed on 76% of active iOS devices, according to new data published this week on Apple’s support website. Roughly four months after its release, iOS 10’s adoption rate is slightly faster than its predecessor, iOS 9, which hit 75% after the same period.

Instagram adds wide color gamut, Live Photos support to iOS app — Instagram has updated made good on promises to incorporate wide colour gamut support for iPhone 7 owners in a backend software update that also includes compatibility with Apple’s Live Photos.