Tag Archives: lies

The Apocalypticon ~ Bias, lies, Trump, China, smog, climate, stuttering, losses, support, bat Ebola, anti-gay Chechnya, robot cull, fake rain, right rises, EU, opioids beat road deaths


We’re all biased. We all cling to beliefs despite the evidence. Immersive theatre experience The Justice Syndicate aims to show why. We compare ourselves to others to evaluate our own opinions and abilities.

Lies, loyalty … Cohen admits polling schemes — President Trump’s former personal attorney Michael Cohen has now acknowledged  he schemed to rig online polls that sought to make Trump seem like a more plausible presidential candidate. [Yeah, because that was always one hell of a stretchy, and yet …] “I truly regret my blind loyalty to a man who doesn’t deserve it.” [We all regret that of you, Michael.]
President Donald Trump directed his longtime attorney Michael Cohen to lie to Congress about negotiations to build a Trump Tower in Moscow, according to two federal law enforcement officials involved in an investigation of the matter. As Trump told the public he had no business deals with Russia, sources said Trump and his children Ivanka and Donald Trump Jr received regular, detailed updates about the real estate development from Cohen, who was in charge of the project. This is the first known example of Trump explicitly telling a subordinate to lie directly about his own dealings with Russia.

More stutters for Chump — A federal judge in Pennsylvania has blocked the Trump administration from implementing a rule allowing employers to decline to offer contraceptive coverage on moral or religious grounds with a nationwide injunction. The new policy cannot be reconciled with the text and purpose of the ACA — which seeks to promote access to women’s healthcare, not limit it. [So there.]
Base slips — While the longest government shutdown in US history continues, President Trump’s approval rating is down, and there are cracks showing with his base. He currently stands at 39% approve, 53% disapprove — a 7-point net change from December when his rating was 42% approve, 49% disapprove.
Surprising Republican governor introduces sweeping environmental protections — In his first week in office, Florida’s new Republican Governor Ron Desantis has made the environment and climate change a top focus. [What climate change, right Don?]

Around the world — The poles are shifting: the magnetic field is changing so rapidly that researchers have to fix the model now. And the error is increasing all the time.
Not much left — A comprehensive new high-resolution analysis of human modification of the planet finds that just 5% of the Earth’s land surface is currently unaffected by humans, far lower than a previous estimate of 19%. 95% of the Earth’s land surface has some indication of human modification, while 84% has multiple human impacts, the study found.

Opioids beat US road toll:
 for the first time in US history, a leading cause of deaths — vehicle crashes — has been surpassed in likelihood by opioid overdoses, according to a new report on preventable deaths from the National Safety Council. Americans now have a 1 in 96 chance of dying from an opioid overdose, according to the council’s analysis of 2017 data on accidental death. The probability of dying in a motor vehicle crash is 1 in 103.
Chechen anti-gay crusade — Around 40 have been detained and another two killed in the latest crackdown on Chechnya’s LGBT community, Russian activists say.
Bat-borne Ebola virus in China — Researchers from Singapore’s Duke-NUS Medical School, in collaboration with scientists in China, have identified and characterised a new genus of filovirus from a Rousettus bat in China. The results confirm that the Měnglà virus is evolutionarily closely related to Ebola virus and Marburg virus.
Fake rain for the fog — In the capital of Thailand, a bout of toxic air has gotten so bad that officials are planning to literally make it rain to combat the smog.
Right rises and aims to infiltrate EU — Right-wing populist parties in Europe have been gaining strength for years. Now, they hope to use European Parliament elections in May as a springboard for gaining greater influence in the EU. Surveys indicate they may be successful.
Robot cull — The world’s first hotel “staffed by robots” has culled half of its steely eyed employees, because they’re rubbish and annoy the guests.  The hotel has multilingual ‘female’ robots on the reception desk; guests are checked in using face recognition and robot concierges carry your luggage. [Maybe they should join the Hotel Workers Union?]

In, erm, ‘good’ news — Apple’s CEO reckons we deserve online privacy. You know, coz Apple makes all its billions from charging too much rather than selling our data. Yeah, go Tim. [Anyway, I suspect this has more to do with casting aspersions on competitors.]

The Apocalypticon ~ Climate terror, data, lies, rats, Cohen


The most terrifying climate disasters Of 2018 — 2018 has been the year when climate change’s influence on our weather crystallised further. The flames showed up in our proverbial (and in some cases, literal) backyard. And the planet, our home, will go up in smoke if we don’t act soon.
Second hottest Arctic — According to a new report released by the US National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, the Arctic had its second-hottest year on record in 2018. Arctic air temperatures over the past five years exceeded all previous records since 1900.
Life is changing in the Arctic — Utqiaġvik is warming, along with the rest of the Arctic, about twice as fast as the rest of the globe. Utqiaġvik, formerly known as Barrow, sits right on the edge of the Arctic Ocean at the very top of Alaska. It’s the northernmost town in the United States, and home to about 4400. The coastline here used to be edged with sea ice for nearly the whole year. But that period is getting shorter and shorter, and as a result Utqiaġvik locals are dealing with coastal erosion and are changing how they hunt in the fall.
Rapid global warming caused the largest extinction event in the Earth’s history — It wiped out the vast majority of marine and terrestrial animals on the planet, scientists have found. The mass extinction, known as the “great dying”, occurred around 252m years ago.

Quakes and tsunamis — US quake: A magnitude 4.4 earthquake struck at around 4:14am near Decatur, Tennessee on December 12th. That’s about 150 miles southeast of Nashville. But Tennessee residents weren’t the only ones to feel the temblor: over 7700 people reported experiencing it from Kentucky and northern Alabama to the western Carolinas, and even in Atlanta.
Japan’s plans for a 30-metre (100-foot) tsunami — It will shake houses and tall buildings, and unleash a 30-metre tsunami on one of the most densely populated and industrialised coastlines in the world. It could kill and injure a million people. And it will almost certainly come in the next few decades. Now, the Japanese government is making plans to evacuate millions of people in anticipation of what could be one of the worst natural disasters in history: the Nankai Trough megaquake. [Good name for a band, though!] Clearly, we need to step up our geoengineering
But we may run out of the materials we need — Plenty of high-tech electronic components, like solar panels, rechargeable batteries, and complex circuits require specific rare metals. These can include magnetic neodymium, electronic indium, and silver, along with lesser-known metals like praseodymium, dysprosium, and terbium. These metals are mined in large quantities in countries around the world, and they make their way into the supply chains of all sorts of electronics and renewables companies. But there may not be enough to combat climate change.

Data wars — Facebook admits bug may have briefly exposed photos of 6.8 million app users: Between September 13th and 25th, a bug temporarily exposed more photos than intended to third-party apps that use Facebook logins, the social network acknowledged in December.
So are you ready to ditch ’em? Here’s a reflection on a month without Apple, Microsoft, Google, Facebook, and Amazon, plus a how-to guide if you want to quit the biggest companies in tech.
Chinese hackers are breaching Navy contractors to steal targets include everything from ship-maintenance data to missile plans, triggering a top-to-bottom review of cyber vulnerabilities, WSJ reported, citing officials and experts.
Floating IT hacks — IT systems on boats aren’t as air-gapped as people think. They are falling victims to all sorts of cyber-security incidents, such as ransomware, worms, viruses, and other malware usually carried on board via USB sticks. These cyber-security incidents have only been recently revealed as past examples of what could go wrong, in a new cyber-security guideline released by 21 international shipping associations and industry groups. In one of the many incidents, a new-build dry bulk ship was delayed from sailing for several days because its ECDIS was infected by a virus.
Android facial recognition fooled by fake heads — Forbes magazine tested four of the most popular handsets running Google’s operating systems and Apple’s iPhone to see how easy it’d be to break into them with a 3D-printed head. All the Android handsets opened with the fake (but Apple’s phone was impenetrable).
Talking about fake heads … Michael Cohen on Trump — Michael Cohen, President Trump’s onetime lawyer and fixer, says his former boss knew it was wrong to order hush money payments made during the 2016 presidential campaign to two women who say they had affairs with Trump – but he directed Cohen to do it anyway to help his election chances. Cohen pleaded guilty to financial crimes, campaign finance violations and lying to Congress about efforts to build a Trump Tower in Moscow

Talking about rats — Washington, DC, has a serious rat problem on its hands. But this has little to do with the shady goings-on at some of the highest levels of government. The Associated Press has reported that the DC region is facing a serious problem with Rattus Norvegicus, or the brown rat, an infestation that’s being exacerbated by a population spike thanks to milder winters.

Any good news? A little: a coalition of environmental groups who monitor divestment released a report at the Poland climate talks showing that the number of groups pulling their money out of fossil fuels had reached 1000. Together, these groups manage nearly $11 trillion worth of funds.