Tag Archives: keyboard

Five Tip Friday ~ Focus on iPhone


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1/ Additional currency symbols on the iOS keyboard — The keyboard on the iPhone and iPad has a surprising number of extra characters that you can type if you know how to find them. Here’s how you type international currency symbols like the British pound, the Euro and more:
Tap the ‘123’ button at lower left of the on-screen keyboard.
Tap-and-hold on the Dollar sign ($) – ie, touch the character and leave your finger on it, just like you do to get the accented vowels. Slide your finger over to the correct character on the popup that appears without letting your finger lose contact with the screen.
Let go on the character you needed.
(Keyboards other than English may have a different array of symbols.)

2/ Jump instantly to the top of a page — Sometimes scrolling back to the top of a long webpage, document or list can be a pain. Here’s a neat little shortcut that many iOS users have overlooked: a quick tap at the top of the screen.
Try this – grab your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch. Next, open an app with a scrolling page, such as a website, list of Mail messages or a long document. Swipe as you normally would to scroll down a bit. It doesn’t matter if you scroll to the very end of the page or just somewhere in the middle; this tip works no matter how far you’ve scrolled.
Now tap once at the very top of the screen – tap around the top level  area of your screen where the time, battery-charge and connection info is displayed –  and it should scroll all the way back to the beginning.

noteshare

3/ iOS 10 lets you collaborate on Notes — The new Notes collaboration tool in iOS 10 might be the reason you need to upgrade. The person who creates the note owns it and has the power to invite people to view and contribute to the note. Just tap the new collaboration icon – it’s a round yellow badge with a person and a plus sign – to send invitations via text, email, or by copying and sharing a link.
If they’re also using iOS 10, tapping that link will prompt them to either open the note immediately or decline. It’s easy and seamless, but that’s only on devices that are running iOS 10 – otherwise, they’ll be pointed toward an iCloud web link to sign in and open the note there.
After that, collaboration is simple. You can see changes happening in real-time, with new text highlighted in yellow for a moment before the background fades in with the rest of the copy. People you’ve invited to collaborate on your note can share the link with others, but they can’t invite additional people to make changes. You can cut off access to your note at any time, or delete the note altogether. Notes that people are collaborating on with you are marked with the person icon in your list of notes.

parkedcar4/ Apple Maps in iOS 10 knows where you parked your car — A new feature in Apple’s newly released iOS 10 automatically remembers where your car is located. This is done automatically for a trip that does not end at the user’s home address. The new feature notifies a user that their vehicle is parked and drops a pin on a map in its location. Users can get directions to their parked car, or edit the location to pinpoint it more accurately.
A parked car also shows up automatically as a recommended destination in Apple Maps – a ‘Parked car’ option shows up on the Apple Maps lock screen widget for easy access, if a user has that enabled in iOS 10.
(Maps has other significant changes in iOS 10, including quick access to destinations along a current route, such as gas stations or restaurants. Maps now also provides information on traffic conditions and current road hazards, and the view will zoom in or out appropriately based on speed, location and upcoming route.)

5/ iCloud can back up and restore Health Data — Apple improved options from the latest version of iOS 9 and after. iCloud still does not sync our Health data, but iCloud Backup places a copy with your other data – which means it can restore it to a new device.
It’s wise to manually run a backup shortly before you switch to a new device: make sure your iPhone is on a known network, plug it into power, go to Settings>iCloud>Backup, manually start a backup (tap ‘Backup Now’) then immediately lock your device (by clicking the Sleep button on the top right, or upper right side, of your iPhone). Apple doesn’t explain the reason for that last bit, but it’s worth noting.
When you restore to a new device, iCloud should bring your Health data down with everything else. To be sure of it, wait to wipe your old device once you have verified your Health data made the voyage.
The only way to move this Health data to a new device is by a restoring through either iCloud or Backup. As of this writing, Apple does have a way to manually export your Health data, then save it to other apps via the Share Sheet, but there is no way to manually import that data back into the Health app, which seems like an important oversight Apple should fix.  (Apple outlines your options in this support doc.)

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Android iPad Air 2,


Typo has announced the Typo 2 for the iPhone 6 and iPhone 5/5s adds a little physical, Blackberry-like keyboard
Typo has announced the Typo 2 for the iPhone 6 and iPhone 5/5s adds a little physical, Blackberry-like keyboard

Kow-towing … Chinese internet regulator gets private look at Apple Watch — Want a private, behind-closed-doors glimpse at Apple’s new smartwatch, complete with a guided tour by Tim Cook himself?
You just have to be China’s Cyberspace Administration minister. That’s the treatment Lu Wei, China’s Internet Minister, received during his recent visit to California.

Leading Android fansite recommends … Apple Inc iPad Air 2 as best tablet in holiday gift guide — Android Police named Apple’s iPad Air 2 as its top tablet pick among “Android devices” for the 2014 holiday season, calling it “reliable, predictable, and very fast.” [How ‘leading’ is an Android fan site that refers to an iPad an Android device?]

Typo avoids BlackBerry lawsuit by releasing a new iPhone 6 keyboard — The original Typo keyboard case was a dream come true for many BlackBerry users who had converted to iPhone: a case which brought the tactile keyboard of your beloved old device to the best cell phone on the market. Then BlackBerry sued, and the Typo had to sit on the shelf… until now. (The new case is pictured above.)

Transmit for iOS restricted from using iCloud Drive, forced to delete all share sheet options — In its latest puzzling App Store policy assertion, Apple has reportedly blocked Panic from adding the standard iOS Share Sheet to its Transmit file transfer app due to an unwritten policy that “forbids apps from uploading content to iCloud Drive unless the content was created in the app itself.”

Fit Brains Trainer keeps your grey matter in shape — While a lot of us are at least making the attempt to keep our bodies in shape, not so many people think about keeping their brains fit. That’s the idea behind a recent app from Rosetta Stone Canada called Fit Brains Trainer (free, with in-app purchases).

Apple shares high, 5k iMac, Microsoft, slow wifi, AfterShot, Reznor, Droplr


The Retina 5k iMac (image from Apple Inc).
The Retina 5k iMac (image from Apple Inc).

Apple shares reach new peak as company gears up to pay investors $2.8 billion in dividends — Apple shares reached a new all time high of $108 for the end of October, less than two weeks prior prior to the company’s quarterly dividend distribution date.

Why iMac is 5k, not 4k — The  new iMac with a 5K Retina display, boasts of an impressive 14.7 million pixels packed into the 5120×2880 matrix. Why did Apple choose this novel 5K resolution over a myriad of standard 4K? Dr. Ray Soneira of DisplayMate, who provided a simple explanation: video editing. The resolution is geared towards the videographer who can take advantage of the extra screen real estate when working with 4K video streams.

Microsoft says new Office for Mac due in 2015, unveils new Outlook app — It’s been four long years since Microsoft released the last version of Office for the Mac, in 2010. And it will be one more before the next version arrives, Microsoft said Friday. But at least there’s a new version of Outlook.

Users report slow Wi-Fi, dropped connections after upgrading to Apple’s OS X Yosemite — Apple’s new Mac operating system, OS X Yosemite, appears to have bugs related to Wi-Fi connections, with users reporting slow transfer speeds and dropped signals after upgrading.

AfterShot Pro 2 from Corel is a competitive Mac photo manager — Corel’s latest Mac OS release, AfterShot Pro 2 (currently on sale for US$69.00) is hard to quickly characterise. It combines elements of Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop.

Microsoft Universal Mobile Keyboard hands-on: Solid, but not quite universal — Microsoft’s US$80 Universal Mobile Keyboard continues its tradition of excellence with a well-thought-out design incorporating a hardware switch to reconfigure the keyboard for Android, iOS, and Windows devices. Look closer, though, and what Microsoft bills as a “universal” keyboard simply doesn’t deliver, because it doesn’t support Windows Phone.

Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails ‘flattered’ to be working for Apple — In an interview with Billboard magazine, Reznor said that working for Apple was, “unfamiliar and it’s kind of everything I asked for.” He added, “and the bad thing is it’s everything I asked for.”

Droplr is back with new features and Yosemite support — The Mac application is back with a spanking new interface and new features that are likely to appeal to people who share screen shots, screen videos and files.

Five Tip Friday ~ Mac tips for better Finder work


Recent Items offers fast, easy, always-available access to your last-used documents and apps
Recent Items offers fast, easy, always-available access to your last-used documents and apps

1/ Recent items — One of my favourite general Mac Finder features is the Recent Items folder, which lists the last few apps and the last few documents you opened. It’s in the Apple menu so you can use the feature no matter what you are doing. Within apps, under the File menu, there’s also an Open Recent option – this is handy as you can see the last few documents you had open in that particular app.
Security — remember, if you can see these things, so can anyone else. Luckily you can clear these – select Apple Menu>Recent Items and choose Clear Menu from the bottom. In apps, the Open Recent also gives you the option to clear this if you want to delete the easy-open of files you have been working with/looking at.
[Remember — with this redesigned site, lots of images can show in way more quality than before. Just click them, and go Back afterwards to get back to this main page.]

The Mac OS X Finder also tracks which folders you have been in
The Mac OS X Finder also tracks which folders you have been in

2/ Where you have been — Your Mac also tracks where you have been, for your convenience should you wish to open a recently -used folder again without having to troll through your entire hard drive again. In Finder (ie, when you can see the word ‘Finder’ immediately beside your Apple menu) choose the Go menu, which offers a standard list of places you’re likely to go. But notice Recent Folders under this list – and also that it has a Clear Menu option at the bottom.

3/ What files are and how much space they’re using — Choose About This Mac from the Apple menu, then click on the More Info button, then on the Storage tab. Now you’ll see a very general graphical layout of the file allocation for each volume connected to your Mac. This representation lists Audio, Movies, Photos, Apps, Backups … and the somewhat mysterious ‘Other’.
This entry can account for a lot of space on the drive. It denotes files that don’t fit into the other five categories. This classification is based on Spotlight indexing.
Other files include the contents of the System and Library folders (because Spotlight won’t report on them by default), non-media documents such as text files and email archives, plug-ins and extensions, media files tucked away inside packages (because Spotlight can’t look inside packages – ie the contents of applications themselves), and other file types mysterious to Spotlight.

4/ Finder problems? Relaunch it — Sometimes the Finder locks up, or  configuration changes you have made require a Finder restart. You don’t actually have to restart your Mac to do this. Making sure the Finder is the frontmost app, hold down the shift key on your keyboard and open the Apple menu. Select ‘Force Quit Finder’ and the Finder will automatically relaunch.
Alternatively, you can select Force Quit and relaunch the Finder from the list of running apps. Press this keyboard combo: Command-Option-Escape to launch the Force Quit window. Note that the button in Force Quit is different for the Finder app – it says Relaunch instead. Click it … the Finder relaunches.
Thirdly, you can hold down the Option key and click-and-hold on the Finder app for a Relaunch option (and more).

5/ Whisk files into the Trash — While you’re in the Finder, you can zap files into the trash instantly with a  keyboard combo, saving all that clicking and dragging. It’s a little bit dangerous as they whisk into it without a moment’s hesitation, but it’s also pretty cool. Click and select a file (or click and drag over several files) then hold down the Command key on your keyboard, then press the Delete key at top-right of your keyboard.
The trash doesn’t empty, it just fills with the files you Command-delete. But … there’s a combo for instant emptying, too: Command Shift Delete (it only works when you are in the Finder).