Tag Archives: interstellar object

Futurology ~ The A-Star, interstellar object, ghost moons, nano fibre, air batteries, Viking tar, lead in Neanderthal teeth


The enormous Black Hole we’re all orbiting — It’s not Trump, but he will appear in The Apocalypticon, no doubt. Astronomers have reported new telescope observations of the environment around the Milky Way’s supermassive black hole, named Sagittarius A* (A* is pronounced “‘a-star’) and they transformed the data into a lively animation.
The video is positively ghostly. Clumps of gas swirl around the black hole, traveling at about 30% of the speed of light. Astronomers collected the data for the visualisation using an instrument on the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope, located in the deserts of northern Chile. The instrument, appropriately named GRAVITY, detected flares of infrared radiation coming from the disk surrounding Sagittarius A*. The researchers believe the bursts originated very close to the black hole, in an incredibly tumultuous region known as the innermost stable orbit. Here, cosmic material is slung around violently, but it remains far away enough that it can circle the black hole safely without getting sucked into the darkness.
~ Unlike the Earth if Trump keeps on going the way he is. You know, “Climate change is a hoax!” etcetera. 

Life floats by. Maybe — Life may exist elsewhere in the Milky Way galaxy, though try as they might, scientists have yet to detect any sign of it. Part of the problem has to do with the size of space; finding traces of organic substances or the waste signatures of alien megastructures isn’t easy at such cosmic distances. Fortunately, there’s the possibility that alien life will come to us in the form of interstellar objects.
Things changed on October 19, 2017 when astronomers at the Hawaiian Pan-STARRS1 telescope system detected the first known interstellar object to visit our Solar System.
~ Basically, when it swings by, they want to examine it for bio-markers. 

Ghostly dust moon — A ghostly dust satellite or two might be orbiting the Earth, according to new research building on a 60-year-old idea. Massive objects attract one another through the force of gravity. But when you have multiple huge objects with just the right masses, their mutual gravitational field can introduce some anomalies – like gravitational points that can hold things stable.
~ It took some work, but they found a cloud. 

Chinese nano-fibre can lift 160 elephants — A research team from Tsinghua University in Beijing has developed a fibre they say is so strong it could even be used to build an elevator to space. They say just 1 cubic centimetre of the fibre – made from carbon nanotube – would not break under the weight of 160 elephants – that’s more than 800 tonnes. And that tiny piece of cable would weigh just 1.6 grams. The Chinese team has developed a new ‘ultralong’ fibre from carbon nanotube that they say is stronger than anything seen before, patenting the technology and publishing part of their research in the journal Nature Nanotechnology earlier this year.
~ Imagine getting stuck in that elevator, though. It’s not the solitude or the claustrophobia that would do me in, but the interminable canned Crowded House!

Compressed Air makes the best ‘battery’ — The concept for storing energy with compressed air is simple: suck in some air from the atmosphere, compress it using electrically-driven compressors and store the energy in the form of pressurised air. When you need that energy you just let the air out and pass it through a machine that takes the energy from the air and turns an electrical generator. Compressed air energy storage (or CAES), to give it its full name, can involve storing air in steel tanks or in much less expensive containments deep underwater. In some cases, high pressure air can be stored in caverns deep underground, either excavated directly out of hard rock or formed in large salt deposits by so-called “solution mining”, where water is pumped in and salty water comes out. Such salt caverns are often used to store natural gas. Compressed air could easily deliver the required scale of storage, but it remains grossly undervalued by policymakers, funding bodies and the energy industry itself.
~ Whoosh!

When kids stop smoking dope, their cognition improves in just one week — A study published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry finds that when adolescents stop using marijuana, even for just one week, both verbal learning and memory improve. The study contributes to growing evidence that marijuana use in adolescents is associated with reduced neurocognitive functioning.
~ So, you choose: legal high or legal low? 

The Vikings succeeded thanks to tar power — Vikings acquired the capacity to produce tar at an industrial scale as early as the 8th century AD, according to new research. The protective black goo was applied to the planks and even to the sails of the ships the Vikings used for trade and launching raids. Without the ability to produce copious amounts of tar, this new study suggests, the Viking Age may have never happened.
New research published in the journal Antiquity has shed new light on how the Vikings made tar, revealing a unique method of tar production previously unknown to scientists.
~ Snorri Tarson, then. 

Neanderthals had lead in their teeth — Around 250,000 years ago, two Neanderthal children were exposed to excessive levels of lead in what is now France, according to new research. It’s the oldest known case of lead exposure in hominin remains – a discovery that’s presenting an obvious question: how could this have possibly happened so long ago? This is considered the oldest documented exposure to lead in hominin remains. As the how these children were exposed to lead, the scientists can only speculate.
~ Early dental work? 

 

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