Tag Archives: Germany

The Apocalypticon ~ This is America, Around the World in awful ways, bullying, Trump, France, Saudi, Germany, Poland, China, World Bank, Russian Orthodox, robots, data, Facebook, digital hoarding


Bullying and the Trump Effect — Francis Huang of the University of Missouri and Dewey Cornell of the University of Virginia used data from a school climate survey taken by over 150,000 students across Virginia. They looked at student responses to questions about bullying and teasing from 2015 and 2017. The researcher found higher rates of bullying and certain types of teasing in areas where voters favoured Trump.
As federal workers miss their first pay-checks since the partial government shutdown began three weeks ago thanks to Trump’s attempt to ‘govern by tantrum’, frustration, anxiety and anger are rising. As the shutdown continues, it is going to have impacts in the billions of dollars.
Older Americans are disproportionately more likely to share fake news on Facebook, according to a new analysis by researchers at New York and Princeton Universities.
Cancer in America has been beaten back over the 25 years ending 2016, with death rates plummeting, particularly when it comes to the four most common types of the dreaded affliction. If you’re rich.
Too much cheese — The US has a 1.4 billion-pound cheese surplus. The glut is the largest in US history: there is enough cheese sitting in cold storage to wrap around the US Capitol building. [Which currently sounds like a more productive move than what’s going on within the capitol.]

Around the world in awful ways — Last week, public figures in Germany experienced the “biggest data dump” in the country’s history. Following a remarkably swift investigation, authorities say they have obtained a confession from the person responsible. Quieting fears that the doxxing attack against hundreds of politicians was state-sponsored: it appears the culprit is a 20-year-old high school student.
French Yellow Vests take out speed cameras — Members of the “yellow vests” protest movement have vandalised almost 60% of France’s entire speed camera network. The wilful damage is a threat to road safety, of course. The protest movement began over fuel tax increases, and saw motorists block roads and motorway toll booths, but some elements may be linked to right-wing groups.
A Huawei executive has been arrested in Poland on charges of spying for China, Poland’s counterintelligence service has reported.[To misquote Roger Daltry, ‘Huawei, who who, who who?’ The Poles really wanna know.] Meanwhile, the Chinese tech giant has been linked to Syria and Iran.
Saudi Arabia will now notify women by text if they have been divorced. Women in Saudi Arabia, who have long been subjected to a litany of misogynistic restrictions on their behaviour including totalitarian male guardianship laws, will soon receive text messages to inform them of changes to their marital status as part of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s ‘reforms’ of the country’s monarchic government.
World Bank says robots aren’t taking your jobs. Yet. The World Bank has released its annual World Development Report, and the headline news this go round, as relayed by Bloomberg and others, is basically that Robots Aren’t Killing Jobs. Of course, the World Bank isn’t terribly concerned with the quality of jobs, just that they are there.
Cuban ‘sonic weapon’ turned out to be pretty innocent — Since 2017, the baffling case of US diplomatic staff in Cuba and elsewhere who developed symptoms resembling brain trauma after allegedly hearing strange noises (sometimes called Havana syndrome) have spawned plenty of theories of varying plausibility. But it was most likely to be, by jumpy, just crickets! [But hey, at least they got to exercise their paranoia.]
China is letting more than 2000 ethnic Kazakhs drop their Chinese citizenship and leave the country, according to Kazakhstan’s Foreign Ministry. [I guess the alternative is to be persecuted like the Uigurs. Hm, Kazakhstan looks great!]
Russian Orthodox patriarch declares data is the Antichrist —The devil is in the downloads, says Patriarch Kirill of Moscow, the leader of the Russian Orthodox Church. Kirill warned that smart devices like cell phones and social networks could enable the rise of Satan’s chosen and the rule of darkness until the end times. [I thought the Antichrist was just logic, myself.]

Hey, we’ve reached data — Cambridge Analytica’s parent company, SCL Elections, has been fined £15,000 (roughly US$$19,000) in a UK court after pleading guilty to failing to comply with an enforcement notice issued by the national data protection watchdog.
NSA to release reverse engineering tool for free — The US National Security Agency will release a free reverse engineering tool at the upcoming RSA security conference. GHIDRA is a disassembler, a piece of software that breaks down executable files into assembly code that can then be analysed by humans. [Let the wild ruckus begin.]
Samsung users perturbed they can’t delete Facebook — Nick Winke, a photographer in the Pacific northwest, was perusing internet forums when he came across a complaint that alarmed him: On certain Samsung Electronics Co. smartphones, users aren’t allowed to delete the Facebook app. Winke bought his Samsung Galaxy S8, an Android-based device that comes with Facebook’s social network already installed when it was introduced in 2017. He found only an option to ‘disable’ rather than delete.
Digital hoarding is as bad for you as physical hoarding — Emerging research on digital hoarding (a reluctance to get rid of the digital clutter we accumulate through our work and personal lives) suggests it can make us feel just as stressed and overwhelmed as physical clutter. [I’m ruthless with my data, and happy for it … of course, it’s all backed up. But I also keep my computer desktop clear and only two screens of apps on iPad and iPhone.]

The Apocalypticon ~ The world, climate damage, insects, coffee, water wars, Germany, Trump’s US, curbing Facebook, your Apple data, sunlight and germs, cooperation


New research shows microplastics in 90%tyde of the table salt brands sampled worldwide — Of 39 salt brands tested, 36 had microplastics in them, according to a new analysis by researchers in South Korea and Greenpeace East Asia. Salt samples from 21 countries in Europe, North and South America, Africa, and Asia were analysed. The three brands that did not contain microplastics are from Taiwan (refined sea salt), China (refined rock salt), and France (unrefined sea salt produced by solar evaporation). The study was published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.
Killing the world’s biggest organism — The heaviest organism on Earth isn’t a whale or an elephant. It’s a tree – or rather, a system of over 40,000 clonal trees all connected by their roots. Pando, a 13 million pound organism in central Utah, is believed to have sprouted toward the end of the last Ice Age. But after thousands of years of thriving, Pando has run into trouble.
Hawking: there’s no god, but there will be dangerous ‘superhumans’ — Stephen Hawking wrote that artificial intelligence will eventually become so advanced it will “outperform humans.” The renowned physicist who died in March the year warns of both rises in advanced artificial intelligence and genetically-enhanced “superhumans” in his book just published posthumously.
Last week was a wild climate ride — From a landmark special report saying we basically have a decade to get our act together to Hurricane Michael decimating northwest Florida, if ever there was a time for the media to finally ask politicians about their plans to address climate change, this was it. And for once, the media delivered.
Unfortunately, the politicians they consulted did not.
Hyperalarming insect loss — Insects around the world are in a crisis, according to a small but growing number of long-term studies showing dramatic declines in invertebrate populations. A new report suggests that the problem is more widespread than scientists realized. Huge numbers of bugs have been lost in a pristine national forest in Puerto Rico. The study found the forest’s insect-eating animals have gone missing, too. The latest report shows that this startling loss of insect abundance extends to the Americas. The study’s authors implicate climate change in the loss of tropical invertebrates. “Holy crap,” Wagner said of the 60-fold loss. [Indeed.]
Coffee is under threat too — “We are in the middle of the biggest coffee crisis of our time,” said the Guatemalan producer and exporter Josué Morales, who works with over 1300 growers.
World water wars — A United Nations report says we have about a decade to get climate change under control, which, let’s be honest (see above)isn’t likely to happen. So break out your goalie masks and harpoon guns, a Mad Max future awaits! Now, as new research points out, we even know where on Earth the inevitable water wars are most likely to take place [map, below – click it for a closer look].Don’t look the perp in the iPhone — It’s no secret that law enforcement often resorts to workarounds for Apple’s security features, but the Face ID technology of the iPhone X makes things tricky. According to a report from Motherboard, forensics company Elcomsoft is advising U.S. law enforcement to not even look at phones with Face ID. This is because with its Face ID feature enabled, failed attempts to get into the phone could lock investigators out by requiring a passcode that may be protected under the Fifth Amendment (in the US, anyway).

It’s a long way back to Germany — German support for Chancellor Angela Merkel and her conservatives is at an all-time low, and in few places is that more evident than Bavaria.
A booming economy and ever fewer migrants crossing the border into the wealthy alpine state haven’t eased a populist backlash against the Christian Social Union (CSU), which is the closest ally of Merkel’s party, the Christian Democrats (CDU). The CSU has governed Bavaria for all but three years since 1946, most of the time with an absolute majority. But now the far-right party AfD is currently the main opposition in the German parliament and is widely expected to win seats in the Bavarian legislature for the first time when regional elections are held.
Why, ma? When German organisers pulled together a demonstration in Berlin to support “an open and free society,” they had some ambitious goals: they expected roughly 40,000 people to pack the span from Berlin’s city centre, from Alexanderplatz to the Victory Column, where they were holding their final rally of the day.
But more than 240,000 people showed up for the march and rallies … [yep, sounds like Weimar again.] The march comes at a time when Germany’s far-right, anti-immigrant political party, Alternative for Germany (AfD: see above), is gaining ground across the country.

Trump-themed dating app leaks data almost immediately — Mere hours after Fox News revealed the existence of a new Trump-centric dating app, a security researcher apparently uncovered evidence that “Donald Daters” is leaking sensitive user information online.
The app, with the tagline ‘Make America Date Again’, is reportedly dumping photos and biographical information about its users into a publicly accessible database and may even be leaking authentication tokens, which could grant full access to a person’s account, including their private messages.
Trump may be self-made, but he’s far from a self-made billionaire Investigative reporters Susanne Craig and David Barstow say the president received today’s equivalent of $413 million from his father’s real estate empire through what appears to be tax fraud [but that’s what made him so ‘clever’, right?].
Massive partisan gaps in the new US — A new poll gives a clearer picture of what US “tribalism” no looks like: Americans differ not just on their ideology or political team, but on the issues they view as problems. The poll presented registered voters with 18 issues, asking those voters how big of a problem each issue is.
Voters supporting Democrats for Congress this year were far more likely to see most of these as problems, with majorities saying 13 out of the 18 issues are ‘very big’ problems. On many of those issues Democratic voters highlighted, there are yawning partisan gaps. For example, 8 in 10 people supporting Democrats say gun violence is a very big problem, but only 1 in 4 Republicans do. Likewise, 72% of Democrats see climate change as a big problem, compared with just 11% of Republicans.
Trump supported offering ‘free helicopter rides’ — Hilarious, right? As they mean free rides in the manner of Pinochet’s helicopters that dropped captured, bound activists and opponents into the sea. Yeah, it’ ‘just humour’.

Data: How ago all but rid yourself of Facebook — In the immediate aftermath of the news that hackers had access to the personal information of about 30 million Facebook users, Gizmodo shows you how to bolt down Facebook – should you still want to use it – so much less information about you is retained.
And here’s how to download all the data Apple has on you

Oh my lord, is there any good news? A little: your grandmother was right about sunlight killing germs: rooms exposed to daylight have fewer germs.

Excerpt from my forthcoming book: “The reason I reject that ‘me against the world’ scenario is that humans are where we are now because of cooperation, not in spite of it. We socialise and swap stories, and then we help each other dig a channel to redirect water, raise a roof or to dig a field over. In the present day, some of us might consider ourselves rugged individualists but, no matter what we tell ourselves, we have libraries at our disposal, and we use roads, social services, health care and communications networks. All of these were built by combined effort for mutual benefit.”

Yosemite beta and Photos, Desk 1.2, Camel Audio, market cap, clipboard managers, Xcode


The new Yosemite beta for developers is working through issues with the new Photos app.
The new Yosemite beta for developers is working through issues with the new Photos app.

Apple releases second beta of OS X 10.10.3 with focus on new Photos app — Apple on Monday seeded developers with another beta version of its forthcoming OS X 10.10.3 update, asking testers to focus (ha ha) primarily on the new Photos app with additional attention paid to Wi-Fi captive network support and screen sharing. [I want the histogram!]

Desk v 1.2 update adds visual themes, separates WYSIWYG and Markdown modes — Developer John Saddington’s Desk (US$29.99) is a simple-to-use editor with some surprising power built into it. Now Desk has been updated to version 1.2, adding some new features while retaining all of its user-friendliness.

Tim Cook commemorates Steve Jobs’s birthday on trip to Germany — Apple’s chief executive was spotted on Tuesday in Germany, where he took the time to tweet a short remembrance of late colleague Steve Jobs before visiting the offices of infamous German tabloid Bild. [Something to do with Apple Watch  I’ll wager.]

Apple buys audio plug-in maker Camel Audio — When Camel Audio shut down in January, customers who used its audio app plug-ins and digital instruments were left wondering why they so abruptly stopped selling their products, but now that mystery has been solved: Camel was bought by Apple. It’s likely we’ll see the company’s technology showing up in future updates for Logic Pro X and Garageband. [Woot!]

Apple closes in on $775B market cap, now twice as large as No. 2 Exxon Mobil — Apple stock hit a new high of $133 at the closing bell on Monday, rocketing up 2.7% on the day to grow its market capitalization to just under $775 billion, a number two times larger than second-largest publicly traded U.S. company Exxon Mobil.

Copy, Paste, Repeat: finding the best clipboard manager for Mac — OS X’s clipboard has always been a transient storage place, intended to hold whatever you copy or cut just long enough to paste it somewhere else. Once you copy something else, that new snippet overwrites whatever’s already on your clipboard. Joe Kissell looks at clipboard managers.

Apple introduces new crash reporting service for developers in latest Xcode 6.3 beta — After releasing a fresh beta of Xcode 6.3 on Monday, Apple outlined a new crash reporting service that will help developers target, fix and track problems directly from the development tool.