Tag Archives: food

The Apocalypticon ~ Quakes, food, water, temperatures, shocks and planet Earth, energy conundrum, better food, people, politics, power, TB, Amazon, Google, Facebook, unions, vanilla Apple


The planet — Powerful earthquakes struck along the western coast of the Indonesian island of Sulawesi on Friday 27th September, triggering a tsunami that reportedly caused damage in two cities. The US Geological Survey said it was a 7.5 magnitude quake just six miles deep. It hit a sparsely populated area in the early evening. The epicenter was about 50 miles north of Palu.
Trump’s administration admits to temperature rise — Last month, deep in a 500-page environmental impact statement, the Trump administration made a startling assumption: on its current course, the planet will warm a disastrous 4°C (7° degrees Fahrenhei) by the end of this century. But the administration did not offer this dire forecast, premised on the idea that the world will fail to cut its greenhouse gas emissions, as part of an argument to combat climate change. Just the opposite: the analysis assumes the planet’s fate is already sealed.
Roundup’s killing the bees — A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by scientists at the University of Texas at Austin posit that glyphosate – the active ingredient in the herbicide – destroys specialised gut bacteria in bees, leaving them more susceptible to infection and death from harmful bacteria. [And it’s linked to cancer in humans.]
Human activity wobbles the Earth — When looking at the Earth from afar it appears to be a perfect sphere, but that actually isn’t the case. Because Earth isn’t uniform on all sides due to land masses that shift and change over time, the planet actually wobbles a bit when it spins. Now, a new study by researchers with NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and several universities and science centres has pinpointed the causes of Earth’s imperfect spin, called ‘polar motion’ and they found that humans are contributing to it.
Human activity shocked space — Humans barely touch on space, you know, apart from staring at it a lot, ringing the planet in space trash and sending objects crashing into other planets and asteroids … or do they? As if the devastating effects of bombs dropped on European cities during the Second World War weren’t terrible enough, a surprising new study shows that the shockwaves produced by these bombing raids reached the edge of space, temporarily weakening the Earth’s ionosphere.
Healthy food, healthy planet? As sales of plant-based proteins rise, there’s growing awareness of the ecological footprint of beef production. Who knew it could take about 190 litres (50 gallons) of water to produce a 100 gram hamburger? More sustainable eating choices are better for the planet.
Clean energy means more intensive, planet-imaging mining — The irony of transitioning to clean energy is we’re going to have to mine the crap out of the Earth to do it. Much like our computers and smartphones, wind turbines and solar panels are high-tech devices whose production demands a smattering of metals and minerals from across the periodic table and the planet.

Politics, unions, people and ‘governance’ — There is a pattern not only in North America and not only in Europe but also in Asia of assaults on democracy, of a new way of using social media to undermine democracy, of new ways of conceiving of political parties as authoritarian political parties. And it’s repeating itself all over the world.
And Trump tries to obscure the Russian mirror with Chinese smoke — President Trump accused China of trying to interfere in upcoming US midterm elections because of the hard line he has taken on trade, airing the claim as he opened Wednesday’s meeting of the UN Security Council in New York. [This is a purely political move that’s technically referred to as ‘an outright lie’ by any reasonable human.]
Amazon Inc guns for unions — Amazon, the US’ second-largest employer, has so far remained immune to any attempts by US workers to form a union. With rumblings of employee organisation at Whole Foods – which Amazon bought for $13.7 billion last year – a 45-minute union-busting training video produced by the company was sent to Team Leaders of the grocery chain last week.
In ‘good’ company … Google parent Alphabet and the other four dominant US technology companies – Apple, Amazon, Microsoft, and Facebook – are fast becoming industrial giants. They spent a combined $80 billion in the last year on big-ticket physical assets, including manufacturing equipment and specialised tools for assembling smart phones and powerful computers and even undersea internet cables. Why? So nobody else can compete.

TB or not TB — A cure for TB has been widely available since the 1950s, yet TB is still the deadliest infectious disease on earth. It kills about 1.5 million people each year, or 4000 people each day, including 600 children. It kills more people than HIV or car accidents. So why don’t we end TB?
Young blood for New Yorkers — Ambrosia [why not ‘Vampyria’, you may wonder?], the startup that injects the plasma of young people into those 35 and older, is looking to open up shop in New York City.

Vanilla-beige Apple RFB media — Apple’s new streaming service reportedly has a $US1 ($1.37) billion budget, but apparently it can’t buy some nerve. The company has long censored its walled-garden offerings on platforms like the App Store, and per a report in the Wall Street Journal, Apple is still aiming to keep its content offerings squeaky clean, with little “gratuitous sex, profanity or violence.” [Also known as ‘RFB’, or ‘really f___king boring’, programming that’s about as edgy as a blancmange.]

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The Apocalypticon ~ Trump, Russia, hacks, security, duped iPhone owners, bent cops film themselves, food and climate


As usual, the US president trumps most of the other bad news. Someone who tried to hack Trump’s tax returns – pretty amateurishly, as it turns out – might get 5 years in prison. Would-be whistleblowers were rallied by WikiLeaks, while one high-profile Democrat offered a $5 million reward for anyone who legally leaked Trump’s financials. You might wonder why this never went any further, until you realise that co-prize a-hole Julian Assange wanted to be Australian ambassador and asked for Trump Junior’s help. How unpartisan is that? It looks like Russian agents leaked Democrat information to Wikileaks to enhance Trump’s chances, after all.
Meanwhile, Trump’s regime wants to use bigoted AI to ‘extremely vet’ would-be immigrants. An alliance of more than 50 civil liberties groups and more than 50 individual AI experts sent dual letters to the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) today, calling for the end of a plan to screen immigrants with predictive “extreme vetting” software.
In a new low, Senator Jeff Sessions has had all his under-oath forgetfulness listed by Wired. How’s that for an aid memoir, Jeffy boy? It gets up to no. 47 … but for a glimmer of hopes US judge has ordered Facebook to redact the info of anti-Trump activists sought by the Feds. Without this, the details of some 6000 people who ‘liked’ these pages would have been available to the FBI.

Speaking of Russians and hackers, the personal computer of an NSA worker who took government hacking tools and classified documents home with him was infected with a backdoor trojan, unrelated to these tools, that could have been used by criminal hackers to steal the US government files, according to a new report being released Thursday by Kaspersky Lab in response to recent allegations against the company. The Moscow-based antivirus firm, which has been accused of using its security software to improperly grab NSA hacking tools and classified documents from the NSA worker’s home computer and provide them to the Russian government, says the worker had at least 120 other malicious files on his home computer in addition to the backdoor. Sloppy, sloppy, sloppyThe reason that citizens in the West are subject now to more surveillance than there was in the Soviet Union is that digital technology made it possible, says Richard Stallman. “And the first disaster of digital technology was proprietary software that people would install and run on their own computers, and they wouldn’t know what it was doing. They can’t tell what it’s doing.” Stallman has been fighting this battle since 1983.

Criminals duping iPhone buyers out of their phones — A security report has shed new light on the lucrative business of unlocking and reselling stolen iPhones, a multi-million dollar criminal enterprise spanning the globe. The tools used by shadowy hackers involved in this black market trade were detailed in TrendMicro’s latest research. Criminals have turned to sophisticated methods of infiltration, targeting desperate owners of missing devices with phishing emails gearing toward capturing iCloud credentials. They play on the eagerness of the owner to reclaim their lost phone.
The victims might receive a fraudulent link, for instance, alerting them their iPhone has been located. Since the message is carefully crafted to appear legitimate, using a spoofed email account or SMS message, many owners carelessly follow the instructions they’re given. In doing so, they compromise their own iCloud accounts, granting the phone thieves full access to their device.

LA cops film themselves fitting-up a suspect with cocaine — Newly-released body camera footage from a hit-and-run arrest in April appears to show two LAPD officers planting drugs in a suspect’s wallet, selectively filming only portions of the arrest to implicate the man for drug possession. Hah!

Some goodish news — what would happen if the entire US went vegan Researchers found a 23% increase in the amount of food available – mainly in grains – and a 28% decrease in agricultural greenhouse gas emissions. However, they only found a 2.6% decrease in overall greenhouse gas emissions and found deficiencies in the American diet’s essential nutrients. Still, at least it’s being considered.
And climate-conscious cities have been sharing their experiences. At last week’s COP23 climate conference in Bonn, Germany, Essen’s representative was all ears as officials from other post-industrial cities shared their stories. Speakers included representatives from Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, and Beijing’s E-Town (short for Economic-Technological Development Area)—all cities that make up the new Urban Transitions Alliance.