Tag Archives: email threads

Five Tip Friday ~ Live Photos in macOS, email threads, finding 32-bit apps, Calendar invites, blank disk images


1/ View ‘Live Photos’ in macOS Sierra’s Photos app — The Live Photos feature of recent iPhones is a lot of fun. It captures 1.5 seconds of movement surrounding a 12-megapixel still image (think the “moving newspaper” photos in the Harry Potter films). A Live Photo is signified by a small concentric circle and “Live” text in the corner of the picture. If you want to play the video portion of a Live Photo in macOS Sierra, here’s how:
Open the Photos app.
Open any album where a Live Photo is contained
Open any Live Photo by double-clicking on it.
Hover the mouse cursor over the Live Photo to play the video portion of the picture in Photos on Mac.

2/ Turning Off Highlighting on Related Messages in macOS Mail — You can turn this view off really easily by picking a mailbox from the sidebar and deselecting Organize by Conversation from the View menu.
That choice is set on a per-mailbox basis, though, so you’ll need to go through and do it for all of your mailboxes if you never want to see conversations again.
There is a related feature that drives me nuts, too. Depending on your settings, Mail may be highlighting all related messages with a color when you click on just one of them, even if conversation view is off. Click on an email in grey, and then all of the other messages from that thread light up in blue. Maybe that’s handy for you, but if you find it visually confusing, you can disable this. Choose Mail > Preferences from the menus at the top, and then when the Preferences window appears, click on the Viewing tab. The option Highlight messages with color when not grouped is what you turn off if you aren’t a fan of this feature. If you prefer, you could also click on that little coloured box next to Highlight messages with color when not grouped to pick a different colour to use for the highlight. Then you make it really, really obvious why those messages are coloured.

3/ How to See Which Mac Apps are 32-Bit — Apple plans to stop support for 32-bit apps across iOS and macOS. While iOS 11 will remove them this fall, macOS will continue to support them until 2019. Nevertheless, it doesn’t hurt to start early and find the 32-bit Mac apps. If you do find that software you rely on is 32-bit, contact the developer and see if they plan to update to 64-bit. Most developers will, but older software may not get this support, so you might have to start finding alternatives.
On your Mac’s desktop, click on the Apple logo () at the upper left of the screen.
Click About This Mac.
In the window that pops up, click System Report.
Next, in the System Information app that this brings up, find Applications under Software in the left menu.
Click on Applications, and your Mac will take a few seconds to compile the list.
Once it’s finished, scroll sideways to right until you see the header 64-bit (Intel).
Apps will have a Yes/No designation to determine whether they are 32-bit Mac apps or not. “Yes” means they’re 64-bit and “No” means they’re 32-bit.
Many of the items in the list will be from Apple; you don’t need to worry about those. Instead, look for the ones that say Identified Developer.

4/ Contacting Calendar invitees — There’s an easy way to send an email or a message to all of the participants to an event on a Calendar if you need to pass along new information without putting it on the invite. Just right- or Control-click on the event in question. The contextual menu  that appears contains all sorts of helpful options, like a way to switch up the calendar the event is on, for example. But the two choices near the bottom are the ones that concern us: Email All Participants and Message All Participants. If you pick Email, your Mac will start composing one to all of the listed invitees with the details of the event already included in the body of the email. You can then add in any information you need to!
The steps to do this on iOS are simple, too. Tap on the event, and then scroll down to find the Invitees section.
Tap that, and you’ll see a small envelope icon that you can use to email the participants. This is much faster than typing everyone’s email in, and easier than having to remember who all is coming in the first place. (From the Mac Observer.)

 

5/ How to create a blank disk image for storage using macOS Sierra’s Disk Utility — Using the Disk Utility in macOS Sierra, you can create a blank disk image for storage. A disk image (.dmg file) is a file that looks and acts like a mountable device or volume like  hard drive or thumb/USB drive, but it’s not – it’s virtual. But you can fill an empty disk image with data, then use it to create disks, CDs, or DVDs [from Apple World Today], or even unmount it, and mount it when you need it, so it’s generally hidden.
To create an empty disk image:
Choose File > New Image > Blank Image.
Enter a file name for the disk image, add tags if necessary, then choose where to save it. This is the name that appears in the Finder, where you save the disk image file before opening it.
In the Name field, enter the name for the disk image.
This is the name that appears on your desktop and in the Finder sidebar, after you open the disk image.
In the Size field, enter a size for the disk image.
Click the Format pop-up menu, then choose the format for the disk:
If the disk will be used with Mac computers, choose Mac OS Extended (Journaled) or Mac OS Extended (Case-sensitive, Journaled). If the disk will be used with Windows or Mac computers and is 32 GB or less, choose MS-DOS (FAT). If the disk will be used with Windows or Mac computers and is over 32 GB, choose ExFAT.
To encrypt the disk image, click the Encryption pop-up menu, then choose an encryption option.Click the Partitions pop-up menu, then choose a partition layout. Click the Image Format pop-up menu, then choose an option:
Sparse bundle: Same as a sparse image, but the directory data for the image is stored differently. Uses the .sparsebundle file extension.
Sparse: Creates an expandable file that shrinks and grows as needed. No additional space is used. Uses the .sparseimage file extension.
Read/write: Allows you to add files to the disk image after it’s created. Uses the .dmg file extension.
DVD/CD master: Changes the size of the image to 177 MB (CD 8 cm). Uses the .cdr file extension.
Click Save, then click Done.
Disk Utility creates the disk image file where you saved it in the Finder and mounts its disk icon on your desktop and in the Finder sidebar.