Tag Archives: DNA

Futurology ~ Sodium Earth, medical advances, green tech, DNA-RNA etc


Schema DRESDYN: 3-D-Modell der Anlage (Nov. 2015)

Scientists building a mini-Earth with 8 tonnes of spinning liquid sodium — Many scientists still don’t know much about our planet’s magnetosphere, and about planetary magnetic fields in general. There are several effects hypothesised to add to this “dynamo” that drives the magnetic field. Some think it’s related to the buoyancy of the metals inside the Earth, for example. But these scientists want to know how precession, like the motion of a wobbling top, adds into the mix.
To try to figure it out, German scientists are recreating the Earth in a lab. Sort of.
~Data by 2020. Now there’s a vision. 

Of which, UK doctors used stem cells to restore eyesight in two people — Two elderly patients with macular degeneration at Moorfields Eye Hospital in London were given a cutting-edge stem cell therapy as part of a small trial to improve vision for people with sudden and severe loss of vision caused by what’s known as ‘wet’ macular degeneration, in which abnormal blood vessels grow under the retina and macula in the eye. ‘Wet’ macular degeneration is less common than ‘dry’ macular degeneration, but it is a more severe form of the disease. The two patients in the study went from not being able to read even with glasses, to reading 60 to 80 words per minute with normal reading glasses.
~ Further trials needed …

Wearable MRI scanner — British scientists have invented a new type of brain scanner that patients can wear on their head allowing them to move while being tested.
Neuroscientists will be able to envisage a whole new world of experiments with such a device, which looks like a prop (left) from a budget sci-fi movie or phantom of the opera.
~ And it’s called ‘Meg’. I prefer ‘Nut Meg’. 

Editing RNA, not DNA, could cure disease one day — DNA is the code of life, and so advances that allow us to edit that code have unlocked vast potential, from simply editing away the buggy code of disease, to engineering animals that don’t spread illness, to, maybe one day in a distant future, creating so-called designer babies. But editing another essential molecular component of our biology – RNA, the messenger used by cells to turns DNA instructions into proteins – also holds great promise.
~ RNA turns genetic instructions from DNA into proteins.

Machine learning spots treasure trove of elusive viruses — Researchers have used artificial intelligence (AI) to discover nearly 6000 previously unknown species of virus. The work illustrates an emerging tool for exploring the enormous, largely unknown diversity of viruses on Earth. Although viruses influence everything from human health to the degradation of trash, they are hard to study. Scientists cannot grow most viruses in the lab, and attempts to identify their genetic sequences are often thwarted because their genomes are tiny and evolve fast.
~ One man’s treasure is …

First proof a synthesised antibiotic is capable of treating superbugs — A ‘game changing’ new antibiotic which is capable of killing superbugs has been successfully synthesized and used to treat an infection for the first time – and could lead to the first new class of antibiotic drug in 30 years.
~ It’s a simplified, synthesised form of teixobactin.

Researchers create new low-cost, sustainable material for reducing air and water pollution — A new ‘green’ material made from solid wastes and natural polymers promises better results than activated carbon in adsorbing pollutants in wastewater and air. The material is synthesized inexpensively from solid wastes and a naturally abundant polymer, and can cut down pollutants in air and wastewater with more success than activated carbon, the current gold standard adsorbent.
~ Is that hoisting waste by its own petard? 

Bacteria eat greenhouse gas with a side of protein — With the ability to leech heavy metals from the environment and digest a potent greenhouse gas, methanotrophic bacteria pull double duty when it comes to cleaning up the environment. But before researchers can explore potential conservation applications, they first must better understand the bacteria’s basic physiological processes. New research has identified two never-before-studied proteins, called MbnB and MbnC, as partially responsible for the bacteria’s inner workings.
~ If it eats, what does it excrete?

New valve technology promises cheaper, greener engines — New technology reliably and affordably increases the efficiency of internal combustion engines by more than 10 per cent. The patented system for opening and closing valves could significantly reduce fuel consumption in everything from ocean-going ships to compact cars.
~ Aha, but what about compact ocean-going cars?

IBM unveils the ‘World’s Smallest Computer’ — On the first day of IBM Think 2018, the company’s flagship conference, IBM has unveiled what it claims is the world’s smallest computer. It’s smaller than a grain of salt and features the computer power of the x86 chip from 1990.
The computer will cost less than ten cents to manufacture, and will also pack “several hundred thousand transistors,” according to the company. These will allow it to “monitor, analyze, communicate, and even act on data.”
~ It’s a bit hard to see the screen, though, and typing, what a nightmare!

Graphene makes better hair dye — Researchers at Northwestern University think they have stumbled upon an unexpected new use for the so-called supermaterial graphene: an easy-to-apply, safer and sturdier black hair dye that could give other permanent dyes a run for their money. The new dye even made hair immune to frizz and static electricity.
~ Finally, a real use for Graphene! 

Genomes of five late Neandertals provide insights into Neandertal population history — Researchers have sequenced the genomes of five Neandertals who lived between 39,000 and 47,000 years ago. These late Neandertals are all more closely related to the Neandertals that contributed DNA to modern human ancestors than an older Neandertal from the Altai Mountains that was previously sequenced. Their genomes also provide evidence for a turnover in the Neandertal population towards the end of Neandertal history.
~ And there was  hoping one sample at least was from Zurich, so I could write ‘Genomes of Zurich’… but no, they were from Croatia, Siberia and the Russian Caucasus.

Futurology 10 ~ Rosetta, ant-radio, nanobeads, UFO, solar, exo-pants, DNA advances


A photo of an Earth-origin spaceship over 400 million kilometres away from Earth
A photo of an Earth-origin spaceship over 400 million kilometres away from Earth

Spaceship flying 402.3 million kilometres away from Earth — Above is a photo of a spaceship flying 402.3 million kilometres away from Earth. It’s Rosetta, floating in the black vacuum of space, photographed by its Philae daughtership, a lander that will soon arrive to the object on the background, the comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko.
~ Let’s hope it leaves no space-stone unturned.

And now it knows where to land — Site J is the area chosen for its unique scientific potential and minimum risk to the lander. Choosing a landing site was not easy. Comet Churymov-Gerasimenko’s strange, rubber ducky-like shape has presented a host of operational challenges.
~ You’d think the Churymov-Gerasimenkians would have rolled out the red carpet, after all that trouble.

Ant-sized radios — Radios made of silicon and measuring a few millimeters each have been developed by researchers at Stanford University. You can fit dozens of them on a penny and the good news is that they’re dirt cheap to manufacture.
~ I had no idea ants listened to the radio. at least they can carry these ones instead of just having to live inside them.

Nanobeads to sweep your blood — Scientists at Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering have created what is essentially an artificial spleen. The device made of wire and plastic may not resemble the fleshy organ in our bodies, but its series of blood channels mimics the microarchitecture of spleens.
Blood passing through these channels encounters magnetic nanobeads coated with a protein called mannose-binding lectin (MBL), a natural immune protein that binds to the surfaces of bacteria, viruses, fungi, pathogen, and toxins.
~ So far only labtest animals are getting the benefits. 

The 1960s TV Series UFO predicted today’s cutting-edge military tech — This classic TV show created by Gerry and Sylvia Anderson had its share of late-’60s, early-’70s schlock, such as military officers whose mini-skirt uniforms included purple wigs. But U.F.O also had strong characters, nuanced plots and extremely cool technology that, in retrospect, was decades ahead of its time.
~ And the cars!

Solar tech enhances oil recovery — Glasspoint Solar Inc installs aluminium mirrors near oil fields to concentrate solar radiation on insulated tubes containing water. The steam generated from heating the water is injected into oil fields to recover heavy crude oil. Royal Dutch Shell has invested heavily into this.
~ Cynical or what?!

Exoskeleton pants — Exoskeletons that give you superhuman strength sound incredibly awesome but also look incredibly awkward and bulky and uncomfortable. So what about a soft exoskeleton that you wear like a pair of pants?
Harvard researchers recently won a DARPA grant of up to $US2.9 million to develop the Soft Exosuit – so far, it’s created a proof-of-concept suit that resembles black leggings, threaded with cables and attached to a bulky battery pack at the waist.
~ Also excellent for extended dancing sessions. 

Europeans came from three ancestry groupings — A recent study by researchers at Harvard Medical School and the University of Tübingen in Germany has found that present day Europeans are descendants of three different groups of people: a near-eastern farmer group, an indigenous hunter-gatherer group, and an ancient North Eurasian group from Siberia.
~ In my case it was mum, dad and, er …

And if that’s interesting … Check out this story about what they can gather from your DNA these days.
~ Modern-day hunting and gathering.