Tag Archives: Around the world

The Apocalypticon ~ Climate change, China, Russia, US, around the world


Climate — Trump’s attempt to bury major climate change report on Thanksgiving backfired. By releasing the report on a very slow news day, the White House might have inadvertently made it easier for publications to feature its dire conclusions – including hundreds of billions of dollars in economic losses and thousands of additional deaths by century’s end – prominently. Of course, President Donald Trump rejected a central conclusion of a dire report on the economic costs of climate change released by his own administration. [If only he could figure out how to make money out of climate change – then he’d back it 110%.]
Deforestation of the Amazon rainforest in Brazil has hit its highest rate in a decade — About 7900 sq km (3050 sq miles) of the world’s largest rainforest was destroyed between August 2017 and July 2018 – an area roughly five times the size of London. [But hey, at least Brazil has a racist homophobic climate-change denier as president now.]
Insects dying at an alarming rate — Bees are actually dying at an alarming rate, but not only that, all insects are dying, plus the birds, plants and just about everything that relies on insects has seen their populations decrease by as much as 75% over the past 30 years.
Sea turtles washing up — The shores of Cape Cod, Massachusetts have seen a spike in the number of debilitated and dead sea turtles, with nearly 600 animals washing up so far this year, according to wildlife officials; 340 turtles were found alive and 244 dead.
145 pilot whales stranded in New Zealand — Over the weekend a hiker was tramping across Stewart Island, a remote locale in New Zealand’s far southern regions, when the crest of a hill brought an unsettling vista into view: scores of dead pilot whales washed ashore on the beach. [I still think we should change their name – piloting seems to be the least successful thing they do – although they’re probably full of plastic or something.]

China — China’s cars talk to Chinese government. When Shan Junhua bought his white Tesla Model X, he knew it was a fast, beautiful car. What he didn’t know is that Tesla constantly sends information about the precise location of his car to the Chinese government. China has called upon all electric vehicle manufacturers in China to make the same kind of reports. [Want to sell to China? Suck up to Big Brother Xi Jinping, then.]
Another day, another high-profile incarceration — Lu Guang, an award-winning Chinese photographer and New York resident, has gone missing while visiting China, his wife says. Lu went missing after he was invited to a photography event in the heavily controlled region of Xinjiang.
Apple has removed 718 apps from the Chinese App Store in the last few days — The iPhone maker swept the apps out because their developers pushed updates without its permission.  Apple warned developers against updating iOS apps without its permission in early 2017. The banned apps included Sogou’s search engine and maps, online retailer Pinduodo and car sharing service Togo Car.

Russia —Russia’s seizure of three Ukrainian naval vessels near Crimea is an “outrageous violation of sovereign Ukrainian territory,” says US Ambassador to the U.N. Nikki Haley, calling it “another reckless Russian escalation” in a deadly and years-long conflict. [Where angels fear to tread, fools Russian.]
Ukraine bans Russian men — Ukraine’s President Petro Poroshenko then barred Russian men of military age from entering the country, saying the order was needed to prevent an infiltration in what appeared to be an allusion to Moscow’s 2014 takeover of Crimea from Ukraine.
Russia send missiles — Russia is sending new S-400 surface-to-air missile batteries to its installations in Crimea. The move came days after Russian warships seized several Ukrainian naval vessels, adding to tensions with neighbouring Ukraine over the land Russia seized in 2014.

US — Trump planned lavish gift for Putin: President Donald Trump’s company planned to give a $50 million penthouse at Trump Tower Moscow to Russian President Vladimir Putin as the company negotiated the luxury real estate development during the 2016 campaign, according to four people, one of them the originator of the plan.
General Motors, Sears and Toys R Us Layoffs across America highlight a shredding financial safety net — Real retirement security has not been a big enough part of the conversation on either side of the political spectrum.
Marriott’s Starwood Hotels has confirmed its hotel guest database of about 500 million customers was stolen in a data breach — The hotel and resorts giant said in a statement filed with US regulators that the “unauthorized access” to its guest database was detected on or before September 10 — but may date back as far as 2014.
US life expectancy has dropped — Life expectancy for Americans fell again last year, despite growing recognition of the problems driving the decline and federal and local funds invested in stemming them.
US millennials are poorer — Since millennials first started entering the workforce, their spending habits have been blamed for killing off industries ranging from casual restaurant dining to starter houses. However, a new study by the Federal Reserve suggests it might be less about how they are spending their money and more about not having any to spend. [The gig economy is the beginning of the end for human workers.]
Democrats want more info on Amazon facial recognition — A group of Democratic lawmakers are demanding more answers from Amazon about its contracts to provide law enforcement agencies with facial recognition technology.
Microsoft to power US army — Microsoft has secured a US$662 million-plus contract with the US Army for Integrated Visual Augmentation System (IVAS) prototypes, Bloomberg reported Wednesday, expanding its relationship with the military and beating out a slew of other companies competing for the contract. [We are about to enter live battle zone. Please do not restart your computer: critical Security Update will now install …]

A world of pain — UK deals ‘extraordinary rebuke’ to Facebook: The British Parliament has seized internal Facebook documents in “an extraordinary attempt to hold the US social media giant to account” after being repeatedly spurned in their attempts to have the company’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg testify about its data privacy practices. The internal Facebook documents in question could shed light on management’s approach to data privacy issues around the same time it was dealing with the Cambridge Analytica scandal.
Intimate killings of women — Last year, 50,000 women worldwide were killed by intimate partners or family members. That translates to 1.3 deaths per 100,000 women, according to a global study on gender-related killing of women and girls released this month by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC).
Australian firms can sack employees refusing scans — Businesses using fingerprint scanners to monitor their workforce can legally sack employees who refuse to hand over biometric information on privacy grounds, the Australian Fair Work Commission has ruled. [Advance Australia F____]
Online help can read what you type — Next time you’re chatting with a customer service agent online, be warned that the person on the other side of your conversation might see what you’re typing in real time.
Japan has restarted 5 nuclear power reactors in 2018 — As part of Japan’s long-term energy policy, issued in April 2014, the central government called for the nuclear share of total electricity generation to reach 20%–22% by 2030, which would require 25 to 30 reactors to be in operation by then. In 2017, four operating nuclear reactors provided 3% of Japan’s total electricity generation. [They’re on shaky ground.]
Giant viruses —In an oversized US outdoor research laboratory, scientists have made an unexpected discovery, finding 16 rare ‘giant’ viruses that are completely new to science.
Super smart computer viruses — The cybersecurity threats of deep learning and neural networks are emerging. We’re just beginning to catch glimpses of a future in which cybercriminals trick neural networks into making fatal mistakes and use deep learning to hide their malware and find their target among millions of users.
Time capsules that may survive apocalypse — Most of ’em get soggy and ruined, but there are ways

Excerpt from my forthcoming book — It’s kinda on hold as I work on another book, sorry! But I will get back to it after Christmas.

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The Apocalypticon ~ Diseases, fragility of China, spawned in the USA, around the world, and some good news


One of the strangest things that can sicken us is a rogue misfolded protein that destroys the brain — But Prion is even scarier than we knew. Researchers were able to find the prions responsible for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), the most common prion disease in people, seeded everywhere in the eyes of 11 patients affected by it.
Rat hepatitis in humans — A 70-year-old Hong Kong woman has contracted the rat-specific version of Hepatitis E, signifying only the second time the disease has been documented in humans. Health officials in China are now scrambling to understand the implications of this disturbing new development.
Don’t eat the Romaine! The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention put out an unusually strong statement telling Americans to toss any romaine lettuce in any form: whole, chopped, pre-bagged into Caesar salads, combined into spring mix, and so on. The warning covered not just homes but retailers and restaurants, and came with a recommendation to empty any fridge where romaine has been stored, and wash it out with soap and warm water.

Marxists now being persecuted in China — Young people who belong to Marxist groups have recently become the unlikely targets of a state crackdown due to their zeal to help educate and mobilise China’s working class to fight for their rights. [OMG that’s so crazy!]
“As Communists, we should incorporate Marxist classics and principles into our lifestyle and treat Marxism as a spiritual pursuit,” President Xi Jinping said at an event celebrating the bicentennial of Marx’s birth in May … But in August, police arrested more than 50 student activists, many of them members of college Marxist groups.
China’s plan to judge each of its 1.3 billion people based on their social behavior is moving a step closer to reality —  Beijing set to adopt a lifelong points program by 2021 that assigns personalised ratings for each resident.
Former FBI guy advocates retaliatory cyber attacks against China — Louis Freeh, who ran the FBI for almost eight years until 2001, said the threat of criminal charges or jail time would do little to prevent state-sponsored hackers from continuing to steal valuable intellectual property. He reckons targeted cyber attacks and a strong deterrence capability are the most effective way of preventing China and other countries continuing to steal Australian commercial secrets.
The US government is reportedly trying to persuade its foreign allies’ wireless and internet providers to avoid Huawei equipment — Officials have spoken to their counterparts and telecom bosses in Germany, Italy, Japan and other friendly countries where the Chinese company’s equipment is already in use.

Spawned in the USA — James Comey, the former head of the FBI who was fired by President Trump, says he will push back on a subpoena to appear in a closed-door session before the House Judiciary Committee unless he is allowed to testify publicly. “I’m still happy to sit in the light and answer all questions,” Comey tweeted. “But I will resist a ‘closed door’ thing because I’ve seen enough of their selective leaking and distortion.”
Americans blame social networks — A new survey from Axios finds that a majority of Americans don’t think social networks are good for the world. [But hey, Facebook delivered the really really best president ever!]
Creepy Facebook patent — A recently published Facebook patent application imagines an unnerving way to use your data. The company filed for a patent that explores piecing together information about a user’s entire household based on the pictures they upload, presumably for targeted advertising. And yes, Instagram photos were also cited in the filing. [I stopped using Instagram  a few weeks back, no regrets.]
US Ground Zero for climate change — The northernmost city in the US continues to be ground zero for the impacts of climate change. As sunlight fades from the Arctic, sea ice began to form this week around Utqiaġvik, an Iñupiat whaling community located on the shores of the Arctic Ocean. And that’s not right, as the sea should have been covered in ice weeks ago.
Climate change is already causing more frequent and severe weather across the US, according to a Federal report — and the country is poised to suffer massive damage to infrastructure, ecosystems, health and the economy if global warming is allowed to continue, according to the most comprehensive federal climate report to date. [Oh, wait, Trump can’t here is he still has his head in the sand.]
An emerging, deeply weird conspiracy theory for the Californian fires — This holds that those fires aren’t caused by wind patterns, brutally dry conditions, the worsening effects of climate change, or possible downed power lines, but by a sinister scheme directed by nefarious elements within the government. [Of course! Except the ‘nefarious element’ is the government, starting at the top.]
Rains coming to damp the fires … and may cause another disaster — In what may be the first bit of good news in a while for Northern California, rain could be on the way by the end of this week. It could put the kibosh on the Camp Fire, ending one chapter of the deadliest and most destructive fire in California’s history.
Unfortunately it won’t be all good news as the rain could trigger mudslides, hamper search and rescue operations, and make the lives of thousands who are homeless miserable.

Around the world — Of course, Trump famously said the Calfornian fires were caused by not raking between trees. So Finns have been making fun of him ever since.
Russian hackers exploit deadly plane crash to go phishing — Security firm Palo Alto Networks has issued a new warning about phishing attacks linked to APT 28, the elite Russian hacking group tied to the 2016 election interference in the United States. The document, sent to myriad targets in North America, Europe, as well as a former Soviet state, was designed to capture the attention of those interested in the Lion Air 737 MAX airline crash in late October, which killed all 189 aboard.
North Korean state media announced the country’s leader, Kim Jong Un, recently oversaw tests of a “newly developed ultramodern tactical weapon.” The new report is extremely light on details, but it’s a reminder that very little has actually changed in the US-North Korea relationship since US president Donald Trump took power. Both countries have nuclear weapons and both are on a hair trigger as they develop new capabilities. [Or have they just figured out how to make rifles out of plastic?]
Sperm whale dies full of plastic cups — A dead whale floated ashore in eastern Indonesia with its stomach full of plastic junk, including 115 plastic cups and two pairs of flip-flops. World Wildlife Fund researchers found roughly 6kg of plastic in the 9.45m long sperm whale, reports the Associated Press. [Presumably the two people wearing the flip-flops didn’t make it.]
Dutch government finds Microsoft collected telemetry data — Microsoft has been accused of breaking EU’s GDPR law by harvesting information through Office 365 and sending it to US servers. The discovery was made by the Dutch government.

And in good news … A US federal judge has refused to throw out a lawsuit against neo-Nazi website Daily Stormer alleging it led a “terror campaign” against a Jewish real estate agent, Tanya Gersh, and the Southern Poverty Law Center tells the New York Times it expects the civil case to now proceed to a trial.
The lawsuit accuses the Daily Stormer and its founder, racist troll Andrew Anglin, of mounting a coordinated harassment campaign against Gersh that eventually resulted in her family receiving over 700 messages including death threats and references to the Holocaust.
And my favourite: Siri pulls up image of an actual dick when asked about Trump — The apparent glitch was reported on Thursday by the Verge, which noted that the error may be the result of some turkey day trickster either editing Trump’s Wikipedia page or attempting to game an algorithm associated with the image Siri pulls up automatically.

Around the world, Photos, Movies Anywhere, Oculus cheaper, different take on a dock


Tim Cook continues European tour, stops by Apple office and sustainable packaging partner — Apple CEO Tim Cook continues his tour of Europe, making a brief stop at Apple’s offices in Sweden, and continuing to discuss the importance of ARKit to Apple with a local publication.
Apple’s $1 billion Athenry, Ireland data centre has been approved after legal challenges squashed, and Apple, Google and others say Chinese investment regulations infringe on intellectual property rights.

macOS High Sierra: The Good Things in Life Are Free — Robert LeVitus takes a peek at some new features macOS High Sierra has that are interesting and cool, and he doesn’t believe any app has more interesting new features than the overhauled Photos app. Another post tells how to view Live Photos on Hight Sierra.

Revamped ‘Movies Anywhere’ service adds four studios, makes cross-platform viewing easy — Disney on Wednesday launched Movies Anywhere, an all-in-one movie viewing service that lets users watch purchased content from five major Hollywood studios on a variety of platforms, from iTunes to Google Play.
Movies Anywhere acts as a multi-platform content locker for movies from Disney, Sony Pictures Entertainment, Twentieth Century Fox Film, Universal Pictures and Warner Bros. Entertainment.

Oculus reveals US$199 standalone ‘Go’ VR headset, drops Rift price to US$399 — Presenting at an event in San Jose on Wednesday, Facebook’s Oculus introduced the Go, a new headset capable of operating without a connected phone, Mac, or Windows PC.

GN28K Aluminum UBS-C Hub adds expandability options for new MacBook Pros — China-based QacQoc’s newest product, the GN28K Aluminum UBS-C Hub, is designed for 2016 and 2017MacBook Pros running macOS Sierra and High Sierra. It can simultaneously transfer data and charge devices — to a point. It works with devices based on USB Power Delivery Specification (USB PD protocol), but it’s incompatible with devices based on the QC (Quick Charge 2.0/3.0) charging protocol. also, it covers two USB-C ports, although it offers more, of course.
But the GN28K is reasonably priced (just US$89.99 + shipping), and it comes with a 12-month warranty.