Tag Archives: Apple CEO

Obduction succeeds Myst, 5 years for Cook as CEO


The spiritual successor to Myst has arrive
The spiritual successor to Myst is now available.

Obduction, Myst’s spiritual successor, is now available — Years in the making, today Cyan released Obduction which, as they term it, is the ‘spiritual successor’ to their once immensely popular game Myst. Like its predecessor, Oduction is built to take you on an immersive and non-linear story through worlds of wonder and mystery. You can get it from here, for US$29.99 (also via Steam).

Tim Cook’s crucial role at Apple extends well beyond his 5 years as CEO — Though Wednesday marked the five-year anniversary of Tim Cook officially taking reins at Apple, he actually oversaw the company’s day-to-day operations well before he was named CEO, and during some of its most difficult days.

LGBT, El Cap 10.11.4, Apple CEO, 5 ways to keep safe


Apple, other tech companies decry North Carolina anti-LGBT law — Big tech companies like Apple, Facebook and Google have voiced opposition to the passing of a controversial North Carolina law that dissolves anti-discrimination protections for the LGBT community.

Apple released OS X El Capitan 10.11.4 with Live Photos, more on March 21st — Apple released OS X El Capitan 10.11.4 on Monday to go along with its iOS 9.3, and tvOS 2.2 updates. The El Capitan update added support for Live Photos, secure Notes, and more. The OS X El Capitan 10.11.4 update is free and available for download through the Mac App Store’s Updates tab. If you aren’t seeing the update, just search for OS X El Capitan and click the Download button on the app description page. And here’s a Macworld slideshow: OS X turns 15: the evolution of Apple’s Mac OS X through the years.

Apple CEO Tim Cook is among the ‘World’s 50 Greatest Leaders’ — Fortune magazine has released its list of the “World’s 50 Greatest Leaders,” and Apple CEO Tim Cook made the cut. [Hopefully it’s calculated on more than wages and stocks.]
Three Apple executives have each received $55.6 million worth of company stock, the second half of an award granted in 2011 after the death of co-founder and CEO Steve Jobs, reports Computerworld.

Five ways to keep your Mac’s data safe and secure — The hearing on whether or not Apple should be forced to make a special version of iOS so the FBI can hack into an iPhone may be on hold, but that doesn’t mean the personal data we want to keep private is safe. The fight to punch holes through our privacy is still gaining steam, and it reaches beyond the encrypted data on our iPhones out to our computers, too. There are ways to help protect your personal data on your Mac so the government, criminals, or even just nosey friends can’t see what isn’t any of their business. Check out The Mac Observer’s list of tips on making your Mac—and your personal data—more secure.

 

Cook declares, BookArc Mac Pro Stand, Photoshop mistakes, M-Tron synth


The Mac Pro on a BookArc Stand. It takes up only 19.05cm vertically space rather than 35.56cm upright.
The Mac Pro on a BookArc Stand. It takes up only 19.05cm vertically space rather than 35.56cm upright.

Apple CEO Tim Cook: ‘I’m proud to be gay’ — Apple CEO Tim Cook on Thursday published a moving essay in Bloomberg Businessweek in which he publicly announced for the first time that he is gay. Cook is the first CEO of a Fortune 500 company to publicly come out.
“If hearing that the CEO of Apple is gay can help someone struggling to come to terms with who he or she is, or bring comfort to anyone who feels alone, or inspire people to insist on their equality, then it’s worth the trade-off with my own privacy,” Cook wrote.
Former President Bill Clinton, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella & others have since praised Tim Cook for publicly announcing he is gay. [He also said he’s a sports and fitness fanatic. At WWDC this year he just wandered around in the crowd after his keynote. What an awesome bloke!]

Twelve South announces the BookArc Stand for Mac Pro — Mac Pro owners now have another choice of how to position their beautiful cylindrical powerhouse on a desktop (pictured above). Twelve South today announced the BookArc Stand for Mac Pro (US$59.99), a shiny little chrome-plated rack onto which you gently place your computer on its side.

9 mistakes in Photoshop — Each version of Photoshop comes with new features that let you work smarter instead of harder, but old editing habits are hard to break — especially if you’ve been using the program for a long time. Here you’ll find a roundup of some common editing mistakes and how to avoid them.

Making music on the Mac with GForce M-Tron Pro synth — The M-Tron Pro (approx. US$225) is a software-based Mellotron emulator synth, available for Mac as stand-alone or as a plug-in with Logic, GarageBand, Pro Tools, and a host of other music apps. It’s made by UK-based developer GForce Software.

Apple Watch 489 ~ Through a lens darkly


Tim Cook, the Apple Watch and the issue over sapphire glass (image from ABC news).
Tim Cook, the Apple Watch and the issue over sapphire glass (image from ABC News).

The actual Apple Watch, which has been announced, shown off and will be available next year, will no doubt just be a fancy, show-off watch to some people, but with HealthKit it can be a lot more. The real promise of the Apple Watch is in health monitoring apps.

Other things it’s supposed to be able to do is act as a remote for your iPhone and Apple TV. Actually, it won’t even work without an iPhone, so some people will have to buy both at once if they want the most fashionable tech time piece (once available) so far.

And ‘fashionable’ appears to be exactly what Apple is aiming for. Long before the actual object’s arrival, Apple has displayed prototypes at the Paris Fashion Week and the wrist device will appear on the cover of the November issue of Vogue China.

Apple approached Vogue China’s editor-in-chief with the (usual) Apple angle of the clever combination of technology, style and functionality.

It looks like Apple is trying hard to market its Apple Watch outside of the normal male 20-somethings that make up the majority of those launch-day queues, as Gizmodo points out. This means new markets.

Meanwhile, Apple devices have become so secure the FBI is complaining. Seems fantastical, right? It turns out it’s not impossible for police to look at the data on iDevices, it’s just more difficult.

The fantastically named Ronald T Hosko, former Assistant Director of the FBI Criminal Investigative Division, published an opinion piece in The Washington Post that proclaimed law enforcement anger at the changes. Gizmodo has an opinion piece going into personal security and personal privacy.

Meanwhile, Apple has been dealing with all the usual rubbish that gets written about them whenever the Californian giant releases anything. Bendgate was ridiculous: Apple sold 10 million phones in four days and 9 of the bigger ones got bent. As far as I’m concerned, anyone who puts c$1000 phone in their back pocket and then sits on it deserves trouble, or at least a bargain-basement head-examination. For goodness sake, if you go for the bigger iPhone 6, put a good case on it (Apple’s cases are available now and many third party ones are appearing) and don’t put it in your back pocket – or a bench vice!

Meanwhile, you may have heard that Apple’s Sapphire supplier (it’s the material for the high-tech, super-tough lens in the two iPhone Sixes) has filed for bankruptcy. How could they, with an Apple supply contract?

GT Advanced Technologies’ bankruptcy filing continues to take strange turns. A day after signalling its intention to wind down operations and presumably sell whatever assets remain, a report from MacRumors relayed that GTAT filed court documents seeking to free itself from the executed contracts it signed with Apple, calling the terms of the deal “oppressive and burdensome.” GTAT plans to be fully wound down by December. You have to wonder why Apple doesn’t just buy it and run it properly if it wants Sapphire.

The somewhat unforeseen and unseemly demise of this supplier has turned up some interesting facts. GT Advanced revealed it could have had to pay a US$50 million fine if it leaked information about Apple products. This showed up in court documents, according to the Financial Times’ Tim Bradshaw.

You might recall that current Apple CEO Tim Cook was the supply chain expert who made everything work like clockwork – a big part of the rise of Apple over the last decade. Apple has been criticised for its incredibly stringent supply chain conditions before, but this time it’s in the US, so I expect this issue will get a bit more exercise in the press.

At the same time, a report has emerged about the crazy work culture at Apple. Former Apple managers Don Melton and Nitin Ganatra got together and discussed, amongst a slew of other fascinating topics, the hectic and always-on work schedule that comes with being a manager at Apple in a Debug podcast. During the podcast, Melton says “there is no way you can cruise through a job at Apple. That just does not happen for anybody I’ve ever seen.” Melton adds “… these people are nuts”.

You can read more, along with a link to the podcast, at TUAW.

Cook on Apple security and privacy


Apple values your privacy, reiterates Cook
Apple values your privacy, reiterates Cook

Cook solid on privacy — There’s not much Mac news at the moment since Apple launched iDevices only last week, but Apple CEO Tim Cook has some advice for those concerned about privacy and your data: follow the money. In an interview with Charlie Rose posted to YouTube on Monday (embedded at this link), Cook made an impassioned argument that Apple makes its profit from selling goods, rather than selling you.
When  Google, Facebook, and all the other companies makes their money by collecting “gobs of personal information,” you have a right to be worried.
People ask why I shun Gmail instead of Apple’s iCloud Mail – they’re both free, can be used across devices and work well when you’re travelling. Cook said: “So, we’re not reading your email. We’re not reading your iMessages. If the government laid a subpoena on us to get your iMessages, we can’t provide it. It’s encrypted, and we don’t own the key. The door is closed.”