Tag Archives: 4k

Review ~ Sonnet Thunderbolt 3 to Dual DisplayPort adapter


Image from Sonnet site. Either Sonnet has a site smart enough to know I’m connecting from New Zealand and change the desktop picture accordingly, or this was a nice coincidence. The adapter is at centre on the foot of the monitor stand.

This handy little (59x99x16mm) unit from the Apple-friendly US-based Sonnet supports an additional two 4K (up to 4096×2160 pixels) 60Hz displays via separate DisplayPort cables or one 5K (5120×2880 pixels) 60Hz display using both, adapting them into one of those USB-C (Thunderbolt 3) ports on a Mac.
The Sonnet Thunderbolt 3 to DisplayPort adapter runs at 40Gbps and supports audio over DisplayPort and gets its power from the built-in USB-C connector, plus it’s backwards compatible with lower-resolution displays down to 1080p, and other types of monitors and projectors can be plugged in also, including projectors, via adapters for HDMI, DVI and VGA (there’s a list of compatible devices, apparently, at the Sonnet site).

I love how these things ‘just work’ on Macs, don’t you? The instructions for Mac are basically plug it in since macOS already has integral drivers (then launch System Preferences, choose Displays and configure). For Windows, it’s update your BIOS to the latest version, update to the latest Thunderbolt version, confirm it’s running the latest Windows and if not update that too, connect the adapter with your computer turned on and then tell it to approve’ the device. Yikes. I don’t even know what a BIOS is (don’t worry, I don’t really want to, either). Besides, not all Thunderbolt 3 Windows PCs support dual displays or 60Hz refresh rates – who knew? Also, this Sonnet display adapter is not compatible with USB-C-only ports. (I didn’t realise these existed either.)

Conclusion — There’s not much to say about this really, it’s plug-and-play, works perfectly and doesn’t even need a power supply. Sonnet always makes good stuff.

Sonnet Thunderbolt 3 to Dual DisplayPort adapter, NZ$195 (US$79)

More information — MacSense NZ

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4K Apple TV with HDR from NZ$299


(Image from Apple NZ’s Apple TV page)

Apple introduces the Apple TV 4K with HDR — At today’s Apple media event, CEO Tim Cook and Eddy Cue, Apple’s senior vice president of Internet Software and Services, introduced the new Apple TV 4K with support for 4K and HDR.
4K is known as Ultra High Definition (UHD) while 1080P is simply labelled High Definition (HD). As their names imply, 4K UHD has a considerably higher resolution than 1080P HD video. 4K resolution is exactly 3840 x 2160 pixels, whilst 1080P consists of 1920 x 1080 pixels.
High-dynamic-range imaging (HDRI or HDR) is a set of techniques used in imaging and photography to reproduce a greater dynamic range of luminositythan possible using standard digital imaging or photographic techniques. HDR images can represent more accurately the range of intensity levels found in real scenes, from direct sunlight to faint starlight, and is often captured by way of a plurality of differently exposed pictures of the same subject matter.
Variety said it’s as striking and impressive a difference as the difference between standard-definition and HD video and that “if you see it, you’ll want one for your living room. Now.” That was in 2013.
The new Apple TV has an A10X chip [the same chip used by the iPad Pro] supports both Dolby Vision and HDR10. Apple has been working with major studios to bring 4K HDR movies to iTunes as the same price as the HD titles. Even sweeter: those HD movies you’ve purchased will automatically be upgraded. Plus, a built-in high-performance 4K video scaler makes HD content look better than ever on a 4K TV.
The Apple TV 4K always outputs to the highest resolution possible allows viewers to get the most out of their TV, whether it’s an older HDTV or the latest 4K Dolby Vision OLED. It also offers automatic detection of a 4K TV’s capabilities that optimizes setup for the best quality picture.
Apple’s TV app supports over 60 services on Apple TV and iOS devices, with more being added all the time. Cue says Siri is smart about 4K HDR, so it’s simple to find movies and TV shows in the highest picture quality across your apps (e.g., “Show me movies in 4K”). Apple TV 4K will also offer 4K HDR content from popular video services, including Netflix and Amazon Prime Video, soon to be available.
Later this year, the TV app will make it easier than ever to watch and get updates about live sports just by saying “Watch the Warriors game” or “What’s the score of the Cubs game?” Sports fans in the US will be able to track their favorite teams and get on-screen notifications whenever they are playing, as well as see all the teams, leagues and sporting events currently playing through a dedicated Sports tab.
Starting this month, the TV app will be available in Australia and Canada, in addition to the US. And, by the end of the year, it will expand to France, Germany, Norway, Sweden and the UK.
The Apple TV 4K starts at $179 for 32GB or $199 for 64GB, joining Apple TV (4th generation) 32GB at $149, available from Apple.com and Apple Stores, as well as through select Apple Authorized Resellers and carriers (prices may vary). Customers will be able to order both Apple TV 4K models beginning Friday, Sept.15, with availability beginning Friday, Sept. 22. For more information, visit apple.com/tv.

NZ pricing — Apple TV 4K starts at RRP NZ$299 inc GST for 32GB or NZ$339 inc GST for 64GB, joining Apple TV (4th generation) 32GB at NZ$249, available from apple.com/nz as well as through select Apple Authorised Resellers and carriers (prices may vary). Customers will be able to order both Apple TV 4K models beginning Friday 15 September, with availability beginning Friday 22 dSeptember. For more information, visit apple.com/nz/tv.