Tag Archives: 3D bridge

Futurology ~ 3D bridge, power computing, water from air, solar efficiency, exercise exercise, early spearpoints, Australian lion


World’s first 3D printed bridge looks pretty cool — The world’s first 3D-printed steel bridge, a 12.19m stainless steel structure titled simply The Bridge, looks tantalizingly otherworldly thanks to its unique construction methods. It is now ready for installation in Amsterdam following its ongoing week on show at the Dutch Design Week from October 20-28.
~ Far canal.

Creating the first Quantum Internet — Scientists in Chicago are trying to create the embryo of the first quantum internet. If they succeed, the researchers will produce one, 30-mile piece of a far more secure communications system with the power of fast quantum computing.
The key has been the realisation of an unused, 30-mile-long fibre-optic link connecting three Chicago-area research institutions: Argonne National Lab, Fermi Lab and the University of Chicago. This led to the idea to combine efforts and use the link for what they call the Chicago Quantum Exchange.
~ That’s your dedicated channel right there. 

Intel’s latest consumer CPU is close to a revolution — The 9th-Gen i9 9900K retails for US$859, has 8 cores that can run up to 16 threads concurrently, and it’s one of the first CPUs to ship with a turbo frequency of 5GHz. It isn’t just fast, it’s coming close breaking a long believed theoretical limit. 5GHz has been something of a pipe dream for many years, posing a theoretical barrier that most CPUs could not surpass without significant tweaking to the fundamental design of processors. But Intel shipped a limited edition i7-8086K earlier this year with the same clock speed, while AMD shipped the FX 9590 back in 2013 (although this was largely considered a failure).
~ Gassin’ the GigaHertz all right.

Tiny PC a powerhouse — You’ll soon be able to get Hardkernel’s ODROID-H2 — a 110mm² motherboard packing a full, x86-64 Intel CPU that can not only run Windows 10, but power two 4K displays.
The guts of the ODROID-H2 is Intel’s quad-core J4105 processor, clocked at 2.3GHz and based on the Goldmont Plus architecture. This isn’t some cut-down hardware, but a full, x86-64 chip that can run anything a regular desktop can. And it weighs just 320 grams!
~ Boo-yah! Well, I guess we should be surprised going by how much wallop the latest smartphones pack. 

Device pulls drink water from the air — A new device that sits inside a shipping container can use clean energy to almost instantly bring clean drinking water anywhere: the rooftop of an apartment building in Nairobi, a disaster zone after a hurricane in Manila, or a rural village in Zimbabwe. And it does it by pulling water from the air. The design, from the Skysource/Skywater Alliance, just won US$1.5 million in the Water Abundance XPrize. The competition, launched in 2016, asked designers to build a device that could extract at least 2000 litres of water a day from the atmosphere (enough for the daily needs of around 100 people), use clean energy, and cost no more than 2 cents a litre. That challenge has now concluded.
~ Yeah, you thought it was a roof and guttering, didn’t you? But this thing even works where there is no rainfall. 

New material can raise the efficiency of solar power — A composite of tungsten and zirconium carbide (both of which have the extremely high melting points of 3,700K) conduct heat extremely well, and neither of them expands or softens much under these conditions, meaning they would hold up better to the mechanical stresses. This could help, eventually, to lower the price of solar concentration arrays because it’s possible to use much less of it to build a heat exchanger.
~ The real hurdle is to come up with good enough, affordable batteries so that solar power can be used overnight. 

Not exercising at all is worse for your health than smoking, diabetes and heart disease — Exercise helps you live longer [and this is, after all, a column about the future]. But a new study published in the journal JAMA Network Open goes further, finding that a sedentary lifestyle is worse for your health than smoking, diabetes and heart disease. There appears to be no limit to the benefit of aerobic exercise. Researchers have always been concerned that “ultra” exercisers might be at a higher risk of death, but the study found that not to be the case.
~ Of course, exercising on an active battlefield still poses potentially life-shortening risks no matter how fast you can run while carrying a load. 

Archaeologists have discovered two previously unknown forms of spearpoint technology at a site in Texas — The triangular blades appear to be older than the projectile points produced by the Paleoamerican Clovis culture (once thought of as the earliest example of human activity in North America). This observation is complicating our understanding of how the Americas were colonised – and by whom.
~ And that’s the real point of the spearpoints.

Fearsome marsupial ‘lion’ of Australia disappeared 35,000 years ago, but why? — New research suggests it was climate change rather than human activity that caused Thylacoleo carnifex to become extinct. For millions of years, Thylacoleo carnifex ruled the forests of Australia, but the predatory species disappeared around 35,000 to 45,000 years ago. Humans first appeared in Australia around 60,000 years ago, leading scientists to wonder if humans were somehow responsible – hardly an outrageous suggestion, given our track record.
But this research helps demonstrate that even the fiercest predators [hint hint] can succumb to climate change.
~ What’s that, Skippy? Steve’s Land-Rover has overturned in the ravine? 

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Futurology ~ Stargazing, 3D bridge, antarctic veggies, new Nazca lines, Roman refrigerators, four-eyed lizard


MX3D in Amsterdam has almost completed the world’s first 3D=-printed bridge

Using Relativity to magnify stargazing — Two teams of scientists report seeing single, twinkling stars in galaxies billions of light years away with the help of the Hubble Space Telescope. All they needed was Albert Einstein’s theory of general relativity.
~ And I thought that theory was about my Uncle Eddie. 

Milky Way centre has loads of black holes — The supermassive black hole lurking at the center of our galaxy appears to have a lot of company, according to a new study that suggests the monster is surrounded by about 10,000 other black holes.
~ Holey heck.

The first 3d-printed steel bridge looks like it broke off an alien mothership — MX3D in Amsterdam just revealed the world’s first 3D-printed bridge. It’s made of a completely new type of steel, spans 12.19m (main picture, above), and will be installed early next year in De Wallen, the largest and best-known red-light district in Amsterdam. It also looks utterly otherworldly.
~ The pimps and pushers will be pleased. 

Antarctic vegetables — As temperatures outside dipped to well below freezing, and as blizzards pounded the Antarctic research station, German scientists were carefully tending to a remarkable veggie garden – one requiring no soil or natural sunlight. The success of their first harvest, which produced vibrant-looking lettuce, radishes, cucumbers and other treats, represents a promising test run for similar greenhouses that could one day be built on Mars – or beyond.
~ Iceberg lettuce, anyone? 

Archaeologists have now found ‘new’ Nazca lines with the help of drones — Peruvian archaeologists armed with drones have discovered more than 50 new examples of these mysterious desert monuments in adjacent Palpa province, traced onto the earth’s surface in lines almost too fine to see with the human eye. In addition, archaeologists surveyed locally known geoglyphs with drones for the first time – mapping them in never-before-seen detail.
~ It’s a sign. 

Roman refrigerators — Archaeologists in Switzerland are conducting an experiment to figure out how ancient Romans used a series of deep shafts to keep food cool well into the summer months. The shafts were discovered in 2013 at Augusta Raurica, an archaeological site located near the Swiss city of Basel. The Roman colony was founded in 15 BC, and it soon blossomed into a vibrant metropolis and trade hub that was home to around 15,000 to 20,000 people. Today, Augusta Raurica remains one of the best-preserved Roman cities north of the Swiss Alps.
~ Really? To get cold in Switzerland, just walk up  hill!

Four-eyed lizard — An ancient species of monitor lizard that went extinct some 34 million years ago had four eyes, according to new research. It’s the first time that scientists have ever seen such a thing in a jawed terrestrial animal – an observation that’s filling a gap in our understanding of how these features evolved.
~ Ah, but was four-eyed forewarned?