X supply chain, X thanks, from Android to iOS, Ulysses makeover, iPhone fitness accessories, iPad group games


iPhone X supply chain improvements, not weak demand, to thank for reduced ship times — This week’s bump in iPhone X delivery estimates, now down to one to two weeks, fuelled speculation of weakened demand for Apple’s flagship handset, but noted KGI analyst Ming-Chi Kuo believes the change is due to better than expected supply chain enhancements and parts availability.

Thankful for iPhone X — Daniel Eran Dilger at Apple Insider writes that “throughout this miserable year we suffered a series of horrific tropical storms and deadly wildfires; a year of ugly, divisive politics, nonstop fake news and a new broader realisation that many of the people we formerly respected have actually led terrible abusive lives of harassment, assault and even predation of children. We can take some comfort in the fact that at least our technology improved dramatically.”

From Android to iOS — Chris Leckness is writing a series of articles about his transition from Android to iOS. “From 2012 to now, I have been using Android exclusively. I moved through the Samsung Galaxy ranks from the Galaxy Nexus on Verizon to the Galaxy S6 Edge on AT&T. I used the Nexbit Robin for a year before getting the Google Pixel XL. I put the Pixel on Swappa.com last night after 2 days with the iPhone X.
“I look forward to sharing my skeptical comments about this migration from Android to iOS with the AppleWorld.Today audience. It should be interesting to see if the reasons I didn’t like the iPhone in the past are issues that won’t bother me this time around. The iOS home screen hasn’t changed much at all since then and this was one of my biggest complaints …”

Ulysses writing app gets a makeover for iPhone X — The subscription-based cross-platform writing app Ulysses received a big update today. Version 12.1 brings a redesign that works with the bezel-free display of the iPhone X, supports Face ID authentication, and more …

iPhone-connected fitness accessories to burn off calories — You don’t necessarily need extra gear to keep in shape during the holidays, but it can certainly help if you know what you’re doing. Here are a few hardware accessories iPhone owners might want to consider before hitting the weights or lacing up running shoes.

Play some games with your family on your iPad — AppleInsider offers some suggestions of apps that can keep everyone occupied, or at least keep you amused while you keep away from the rest of the group.

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Apple’s iMac Pro – what to expect


Everything you need to know about Apple’s iMac Pro in under 6 minutes — AppleInsider goes through every new detail, feature and rumoured specification related to Apple’s upcoming iMac Pro in a video.
Apple has already confirmed a major refresh of the Mac Pro coming in 2018, but little is known about the next-generation desktop, which will likely require users to buy a display separately. If you want one as good as the recent 5K iMacs, it’s going to cost upwards of $1,300 just for the screen alone.
Now comes Apple’s brand new iMac Pro, due to release in December.

[It’s pretty quiet in Apple news today as it has been Thanksgiving weekend in the US.]

The Apocalypticon ~ Flat-earther, Russia rads, dark wiki, Apple racism, scary tech, evil sugar, coffee good


Self-taught rocket scientist ‘Mad’ Mike Hughes is a 61-year-old limo driver who’s spent the last few years building a steam-powered rocket out of salvage parts in his garage. His project has cost him $20,000, which includes Rust-Oleum paint to fancy it up and a motor home he bought on Craigslist that he converted into a ramp. His first test of the rocket will also be the launch date. “I don’t believe in science,” said Hughes, whose main sponsor for the rocket is Research Flat Earth. “I know about aerodynamics and fluid dynamics and how things move through the air, about the certain size of rocket nozzles, and thrust. But that’s not science, that’s just a formula. There’s no difference between science and science fiction.”
[Ah, yes indeedy and for sure, Mad Mike. Soon to be Flat Mad Mike …]

Russia said it had detected a significant radiation spike in the Ural Mountains, close to a sprawling Soviet-era nuclear plant still remembered as the site of an accident 60 years ago. Russia did however reject suggestions that it was the source of a radioactive cloud that hovered over Europe. [Coz if we don’t like the idea, it can’t be true.]

Darkweb wiki — In many parts of the world, using Wikipedia is taken for granted. But in other places, like Turkey or Syria, using Wikipedia can be difficult, and even dangerous. To make using Wikipedia safer for at-risk users, former Facebook security engineer Alec Muffett has started an experimental dark net Wikipedia service that gives visitors some strong privacy protections.

Apple only wants to put its Stores where white people live — New York’s northernmost borough is the city’s most diverse, has the lowest income per household, and is the only borough without an Apple Store after one opened in Brooklyn’s predominantly white neighbourhood of Williamsburg last year. This trend holds true on a national scale. That means 251 of the 270 stores, or 93%, are located in majority-white ZIP codes. Of the 19 that are not located in majority-white ZIP codes, eight are in ZIP codes where whites are still the largest racial bloc. [Oh, what was that word again, Apple? Let me help: ‘Diversity’.]

In scary tech news, LED street lighting has backfired — To reduce energy consumption, many jurisdictions around the world are transitioning to outdoor LED lighting. But as new research shows, this solid-state solution hasn’t yielded the expected energy savings, and potentially worse, it’s resulted in more light pollution than ever before.
The Wi-Fi Pineapple is a cheap modified wireless router enables anyone to execute sophisticated exploits on Wi-Fi networks with little to no networking expertise. It can be used to run a Wall of Sheep and execute a man-in-the-middle attack, as well as how you can protect yourself from Pineapple exploits when you’re connected to public Wi-Fi.
Intel found severe bugs in management engines — After to an investigation by third-party researchers into Intel’s hidden firmware in certain chips, Intel decided to audit its firmware and on Monday confirmed it had found 11 severe bugs that affect millions of computers and servers.
German regulators have banned smartwatches for kids — Saying the technology more closely resembles a “spying device” than a toy, Germany regulators have banned the sale of smartwatches designed for kids, urging the parents who were stupid enough to buy them in the first place to destroy them.
Over 400 of the world’s most popular websites record your every keystroke — The idea of websites tracking users isn’t new, but research from Princeton University released last week indicates that online tracking is far more invasive than most users understand.
Television’s most infamous hack is still a mystery 30 years on — It has been 30 years since the Max Headroom hack, arguably the creepiest hack in the television history took place. A few minutes after 9pm on Sunday, November 22, 1987, Chicago sportscaster Dan Roan was cheerily summarizing the Bears’s victory that day for Channel 9 local news. Suddenly, televisions went silent, and their screens went black. At first, it seemed like an equipment malfunction. Without warning, televisions in the area blasted loud radio static. It was overlain with the screech of a power saw cutting into metal, or a jet engine malfunctioning. At center screen, a person wore a Max Headroom mask – a character who appeared on various television shows and movies in the 1980s.
After 30 years and an intense FCC investigation, the people behind the Headroom hack remain unknown.

Evil sugar — About 50 years ago, the sugar industry stopped funding research that began to show something they wanted to hide: that eating lots of sugar is linked to heart disease. A new study exposes the sugar industry’s decades-old effort to stifle that critical research.
Now, 46% of Americans have high blood pressure. With new guidelines, rather than one in three US adults having high blood pressure (32%) with the previous definition, the new guidelines will result in nearly half of the US adult population (46%) having high blood pressure, or hypertension.

Gah! But wait, here’s some good news: coffee is good for us again — A review of 200 separate studies has shown even three or four cups a day is still more likely to benefit your health than harm it. but there are some exceptions, like women who are pregnant or at risk of fracture.
The researchers concluded that drinking coffee regularly resulted in a lower risk of heart disease and even death compared with drinking no coffee at all. They also found that drinking coffee lowered the risk of some cancers (including prostate, endometrial, skin and liver cancer), type 2 diabetes, gallstones, gout, liver disease and dementia. [Off to make one – bye!]

Futurology ~ weird asteroid, exotic particle, weather tech, Musk hits deadline, robot salad, microbial kill-switches, ancient dogs on the leash


This artist’s impression shows the first interstellar asteroid: `Oumuamua. This unique object was discovered on 19 October 2017 by the Pan-STARRS 1 telescope in Hawai`i. Subsequent observations from ESO’s Very Large Telescope in Chile and other observatories around the world show that it was travelling through space for millions of years before its chance encounter with our star system. `Oumuamua seems to be a dark red highly-elongated metallic or rocky object, about 400 metres long, and is unlike anything normally found in the Solar System.

Oumuamua also has a weird shape — A few weeks ago an interstellar asteroid, now named Oumuamua, was discovered passing through our solar system. Being the first interstellar asteroid to ever be observed, a flurry of observations soon followed. An article in Nature revealed Oumuamua is more bizarre than originally thought, since it it is elongated, with a 10:1 aspect ratio, and rapidly rotating. This conclusion is based upon comparisons of its time-dependent light curve to those from 20,000 known asteroids.
~ Bye.

Two teams simultaneously unearthed evidence of an exotic new particle — A few months ago, physicists observed a new subatomic particle – essentially an awkwardly-named, crazy cousin of the proton. Its mere existence has energised teams of particle physicists to dream up new ideas about how matter forms, arranges itself and exists. Now, a pair of new research papers using different theoretical methods have independently unearthed another, crazier particle predicted by the laws of physics
~ So here I join in the general excitement that, uh, doubly-b tetraquark could exist. Woot. 

Latest weather-tech in space — A fastidiously clean scanning machine named VIIRS has been launched into Earth orbit on a Delta II rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, just one instrument outfitting a next-generation weather satellite. The Visible Infrared Radiometer Suite is a washing machine-sized sensor, built to capture light and other waves that bounce off the surface of Earth. It collects those reflections, turning them into data about our planet, the oceans, land and vegetation cover, ice caps, volcanic plumes, and global temperatures—allowing accurate weather forecasts, wildfire and fishing fleet tracking, and climate monitoring.
~ I have one in the laundry, although this one actually does the washing, no matter what the weather is doing.

Musk makes it right on time with Australian battery project — Elon Musk will get paid for building the world’s largest lithium ion battery in South Australia, with testing on the 100-megawatt project about to begin ahead of next week’s December 1 deadline to build it in 100 days, or it’s free.
State premier Jay Weatherill has announced that regulatory testing at the site, which is paired with French energy business Neoen’s Hornsdale wind farm, 230km north of the capital, Adelaide, will begin within days.
~ Gosh, doesn’t Elon just look so pleased and happy?

Robot salad — A startup called Iron Ox is taking the first steps toward roboticizing greenhouse farming, which has so far stubbornly resisted automation. In the very near future, then, the salad on your table may come from the hand of a robot.
~ Er, the robot has hands, then? Better make the thumbs green. 

UCLA researchers use solar to create and store hydrogen — UCLA researchers have designed a device that can use solar energy to inexpensively and efficiently create and store energy, which could be used to power electronic devices, and to create hydrogen fuel for eco-friendly cars.
The device could make hydrogen cars affordable for many more consumers because it produces hydrogen using nickel, iron and cobalt – elements that are much more abundant and less expensive than the platinum and other precious metals that are currently used to produce hydrogen fuel.
~ Making electricity and fuel with the same device is a real breakthrough. 

Microbial kill-switches — Scientists at Harvard have developed a pair of new kill switches that can be used to thwart bioengineered microbes that go rogue. Researchers have been testing the use of bioengineered microbes for a variety of purposes, from the diagnosis of disease in the human body to the neutering of mosquitoes. But there remain concerns about releasing manipulated microbes into nature. Could their augmented genes have unintended consequences? Could they morph and proliferate?
~ Somehow I’m not convinced this is safer.  

Ancient dogs were already on the leash 8000 years ago — A new analysis of ancient rock art demonstrates that humans hunted with dogs on the Arabian Peninsula over 8000 years ago – and it looks like those dogs wore leashes.
There are a lot of questions around the origin of dog domestication, such as when, where and how it happened. But a newly analysed set of panels depicts scenes of leashed dogs hunting alongside humans. Not only would this be the “earliest evidence of dogs on the Arabian Peninsula,” according to the study published recently in the Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, but it’s also the “earliest evidence of leashes“.
~ Or maybe it was the dogs that had humans on the leashes … also, did the men really hunt with erections? That seems a little counterproductive if you ask me. 

Five Tip Friday ~ Reminders, settings and Time Machine on macOS


1/ Reminders on Macs, iPhones, and iPads help you remember anything — Easy to manage, use, and share; always available, and (best of all), there’s nothing new to buy or learn. You can use your Apple devices to remember everything using just some of the apps and services already installed on your Mac and iDevices: the Calendar and Reminders apps, plus Siri. When you need to remember something, ask Siri (on your Mac, iPhone, or Apple Watch) to remind you of that thing at a specific time and date. The item is then recorded on the Inbox list in Reminders . Then, you’ll be reminded (with an onscreen alert and sound) at the appropriate date and time. Brilliant!

2/ Location-based reminders — Siri knows where you live, so say, “Hey Siri. Remind me to charge the eBike when I get home.” Then, when you arrive at your house, you’ll get an alert on your phone or watch saying ‘Upload your column’ (or whatever). [These two tips came from the Mac Observer.]
But does Siri know where you live? Open the Settings app on your iPhone or iPad.
Scroll down and tap Siri. Tap My Info and select your own contact card.

3/ Enable apps at log-in on macOS High Sierra — If there are certain apps you’ll always use the moment you start up your Mac, you can set them up to automatically log-in via System Preferences in macOS High Sierra (and it’s the same for previous versions of macOS, for that matter).
Go to Users, make sure your own user account is highlighted on the left, then click Login Items. Click the + and you can choose an app, file server or pretty much anything else that should open when you log into, or start up, your Mac. Once you’ve added something, you can use the checkboxes to opt to hide it, though it will still be running in the background, thus instantly available.

4/ Add other notes to the Notes app —You can take the notes that you’ve created in other apps, and import them into the Notes app in macOS Sierra. When you import notes, you can add them to your iCloud notes account or your On My Mac account. If you store them in iCloud, you can automatically see all of your notes on any device where you’re signed in with your Apple ID:
Open your Notes app.
Choose to store your notes in iCloud or On My Mac. Click a folder in the account that you want to use.
In the menu bar, click File > Import.
Select the file or folder that you want to import. If the notes that you’re importing are organized in folders, click Options in the lower-left corner to keep them organized.
Click Import. When you see a confirmation message, click Import again.
After your notes import, you’ll see a new folder in the Notes app called Imported Notes. Then you can organise them into any Notes folder that you want.

5/ Remove a Time Machine backup disk — If you back your computer up to multiple drives using Time Machine, you may be familiar with the notification that tells you that you haven’t been backed up in [insert long amount of time here]. You see, if you’ve configured more than one Time Machine disk, your Mac will take turns backing up to each of them when they’re plugged in or connected over your network; you’ll get the warning when one of your disks hasn’t been used for a while, even if the other backups are working fine.
The solution to that is of course to plug in the missing backup and let it run, but what if you no longer own the drive in question? Or if it failed or got run over by a giant chicken or something? To stop Time Machine from warning you about the lost backup drive, you’ll need to remove it from the preferences on your Mac, which is luckily darned easy. To get going with this and stop those pop-ups, start by clicking Time Machine’s circle-clock icon in your menu bar and picking “Open Time Machine Preferences.”
If you don’t see the circle-clock near the top-right of your screen, you can instead use the Apple Menu to open System Preferences then click Time Machine. Whichever way you get there, though, the Time Machine preference pane has the option to remove a disk under the “Select Disk” button.
Within that section, you’ll find your list of backup disks at the top. Click the one you want to get rid of, and then choose Remove Disk.

Holiday ad, X shipment times, ringtone sources, South Korean raid, Foxconn ‘halts’ illegal work


Apple celebrates Thanksgiving and Christmas with Sway ad featuring iPhone X, AirPods — Apple has started its holiday advertising blitz with a new music-centric video featuring the AirPods, and the iPhone X and an enraptured couple dancing in the snow. [Saw a guy the other day on a plane with AirPods in, and at first glance I thought he’d put cigarettes in his ears as sound suppressors, lol!]

iPhone X shipment times improve to 1-2 weeks ahead of holidays — Just in time for the lucrative holiday shopping season, Apple has updated iPhone X ship-by times to one to two weeks, a one-week improvement over previous delivery estimates offered earlier this month.

Where to find iPhone ringtones for iOS 11 besides iTunes — There are plenty of places to get iPhone ringtones apart from iTunes. Apps like Zedge have been popular for years, and there are other apps as well. The Mac Observer has found three apps that have cool ringtones and alert tones.

Six must-have iPhone apps for holiday travel — Holiday travel can be pretty hectic, but it’s possible to cut out at least a little of the stress. Check out these iPhone apps that can make your travels easier and your trip experience more fun.

Apple’s South Korean offices raided by authorities ahead of regional iPhone X launch — South Korean authorities have reportedly conducted a raid of Apple’s offices in the country earlier this week, with investigators said to have questioned the company about its business affairs just days before the launch of the iPhone X in the country, which could raise questions concerning the government’s animosity for competitors of local manufacturers, such as main rival Samsung.

Foxconn puts halt to illegal overtime at iPhone X plant — Apple supplier Foxconn in a statement on Thursday said it has stopped high school interns from working overtime at an iPhone plant in China, a practice that violates the country’s labour laws. [Apple’s use of this company is another moral indictment against it.]

Black Friday Apple, more deals, tax crackdown, self-driver paper


Apple offers gift cards with iPhone, Mac purchases in New Zealand (and Australia) for Black Friday — Apple has commenced its Black Friday shopping deals in New Zealand and Australia, providing customers with gift cards if they purchase Apple products through the online and retail Apple Stores during November 24, with similar deals likely to be offered in a number of other regions when each country reaches midnight.
Described on the Australian and New Zealand Apple websites as a ‘One-day shopping event‘, visitors are advised they can receive a gift card worth up to NZ$210 ($144) or A$210 ($160) with the purchase of “selected Apple gifts” (some iPhones, iPads and Apple Watch series 1, plus five models of Mac). Customers are limited to a maximum of two gift cards under the promotion, making the maximum combined value of gift cards attainable in the offer NZ$420 ($289) or A$420 ($320) for each respective region.

Here are some more deals for you — It’s Friday here already, so … MacPhun’s Aurora photo software is normally NZ$138; it’s on sale for NZ$122, and comes with 40 HDR presets, a Trey Ratcliffe video and an imagery eBook. Apple Insider has a key to getting the best deals, although many will not be relevant to Antipodeans, and there are early Black Friday deals from Smile (30% off on both PDFpen and TextExpander), and from Pad & Quill cases (15% off) plus MacPhun’s Luminar 2018 is just US$69, and this price includes US$130 worth of bonuses for free. There are also some good deals on HomeSpot USB-C hubs, but you’ll have to factor in shipping.

UK government to initiate tax crackdown on tech firms holding earnings offshore — The UK Treasury has said it will begin cracking down on large corporations that shift British earnings overseas in a bid to avoid the country’s high taxes, a move that follows a wider European Union strategy seeking much the same. Along with big-name corporations like McDonalds, the initiative targets tech companies like Apple and Google, which use complex accounting strategies to skirt high taxes.

Apple posts research paper about self-driving cars — Apple has posted research on how self-driving cars can better spot objects while using fewer sensors. It appears to be the company’s first publicly disclosed paper on autonomous vehicles.

Sonic the Hedgehog, AR headsets, AR games, flawless expense


Sega releases Sonic the Hedgehog 2 free on iPhone, iPad, Apple TV to celebrate 25th anniversary — Sega has added another classic title to its Sega Forever free-to-play game collection, by making the iPhone and iPad port of ‘Sonic the Hedgehog 2’ available to download on iOS and tvOS, on the 25th anniversary of the original game’s release on the Genesis game console.
Sonic the Hedgehog 2 is free to download and play, supported by advertising, but an in-app purchase removes all ads.

Apple buys company specialising in AR headset technology — Apple has acquired a Montreal start-up along its reported route toward building an augmented reality headset. The tech giant bought Vrvana, makers of a headset called Totem (pictured above), for around $30 million, TechCrunch reports.
The Totem headset is featured on Vrvana’s website but hasn’t been released, and focuses on combining both AR and virtual reality features in the same headset. A number of Vrvana employees have joined Apple in California, TechCrunch notes.

Five run AR video games for iPhone — Apple brought augmented reality to the masses with iOS 11. Tim Cook says augmented reality will make iPhone “even more essential,” and we can see this in the App Store. This Thanksgiving The Mac Observer has rounded up five fun AR video games to kill time when you’re traveling or just want something to do.

Apple’s leather sleeve for the 12-inch MacBook has a handsome, flawless design — Apple’s NZ$269/US$149.99 leather sleeve for MacBook is, as far as I can tell, the first case the tech giant has ever released for one of its laptops. And it’s as classy, and pricey, as you’d expect.
Available in saddle brown or midnight blue, the case for the 12-inch MacBook is, per Apple, is crafted from “high-quality European leather with a soft microfiber lining.” Its design allows you to charge your laptop while keeping it protected.

Net Neutrality, website tracking worse, Black Friday sales!


It’s Black Friday sales time!

Text of FCC ‘Proposal to Restore Internet Freedom’ released, eradicates net neutrality rules — As promised, the US Federal Communcations Commission has released the full text of the Proposal to Restore Internet Freedom which completely removes restrictions on throttling or prioritising content, and explicitly allows paid prioritization of content.

Website tracking to be worse than thought, study shows — New research from Princeton University reveals that website tracking is more prevalent than most people think. In the first release of a series called No Boundaries, the researchers explain how third-party scripts that run on many websites track your keystrokes and send it to third parties.

Tomorrow is Black Friday and the sales have already started — MacPaw has 30% off its of apps including Gemini, CleanMyMac and even bundles, Readdle has PDF Expert for US$45.99 instead of US$59.99, PhotoLemur, the remarkable software that anyone can use to dramatically enhance photos very easily, is 60% off, but only till 6pm NZ time (ten-hour run), you can get 249 coding lessons in Swift and for iOS development for only US$10 today, and my own publishing company CreativeTech has its iBooks titles dramatically reduced until 30th November – just type CreativeTech into the iBooks Store.
These are Until the World Returns by Jan Naeije – the inside story of a Dutch Resistance fighter in World War Two normally NZ$11.99, now NZ$6.99
US$2.99 / UK£2.49 / A$3.99 and €2.99; Friendship, Foes and Feathers book 1: June, Anne and the Great War for just NZ$4.99 / US$2.99 / UK£2.49 / A$3.99 and €2.99 ; Parcels From Home: Jack’s War, a Graphic Historic Interpretation fully written and illustrated by the Listener’s Steve Bolton based on the research for Parcels From Home (below) is currently just NZ$6.99/US3.99, a huge savings on a very rich and rewarding book normally NZ$17.99 (pictured above) with sound, bibliography, informational pop-outs, and German to English translations.
Parcels From Home: The Prisoner of War Parcel Scheme and the New Zealand Red Cross in World War Two is currently just NZ$4.99 or US$3.99 / UK£3.49 / A$3.99 and €4.49; and the longer version with an extra chapter on New Zealand in the Pacific War and more audio-visual content (the ‘Trainspotter Edition’ of this same book) is normally NZ$18.99, now NZ$6.99 (extra chapter, more audio-visual content) or US$3.99 not 11.99, UK£3.49 not £9.49, A$5.99 not A$17.99 and €4.49 not €13.99.
Ranger: The Making of a New Zealand Yachting Legend by Sandra Gorter is normally NZ$11.99, now it’s NZ$6.99 /US$3.99/UK£3.49/A$5.99 and €4.49 – this is the iBooks version of this New Zealand best seller.
Remember: you can get a free sample of any of these iBooks any time, to try before you buy; clicking the above links does not commit you to buy; these only work on iBooks on Apple devices, but buy one and it installs on all the Apple devices signed into that iCloud account; and if you finish on a  page on your iPad then open it on your Mac or iPhone, it opens on the same page and any notes or highlights you have added appear in all device versions you read, which makes them wonderful study aids.

More Foxconn criticism, Fuchsia to support Swift apps


Google is apparently working on a programming language that will support apps written in Apple’s Open Source Swift

Foxconn accused of using illegal student labor to build Apple’s iPhone X — Apple’s main assembly partner, Foxconn, has been demanding illegal overtime from high school interns in its production of the iPhone X, a report charged on Tuesday.
Six of the students, aged 17 to 19, said they regularly work 11-hour days on the iPhone X at a factory in Zhengzhou, in violation of Chinese law for interns, according to the Financial Times. The students added that they’re with a group of 3000 students from Zhengzhou Urban Rail Transit School, all sent to the Foxconn factory in September and told that a three-month internship was required to graduate!

Google’s upcoming ‘Fuchsia’ OS to support Apple’s Swift language — Google’s nebulous ‘Fuchsia’ operating system – still in development – will apparently support apps written in Apple’s open-source Swift programming language.
A Google employee recently created a pull request on Swift’s GitHub repository, adding Fuchsia support to the compiler, Android Police noted this week. Fuchsia already supports a Google-created language called Dart, as well as standards like C and C++. [So, bright Fuchsia or no Fuchsia for you?]

iMac Pro A10, Sonnet eGFX Breakaway Puck, 100% recycled, Reflector 3


Apple’s Lisa Jackson has reiterated Apple’s strive towards 100% recycled materials

Hey Siri might come to the iMac Pro thanks to an A10 Fusion coprocessor — Developers Guilherme Rambo and Stephen Troughton-Smith have found ‘Hey Siri’ functionality in the macOS code base with support for multiple user accounts all driven by what appears to be the A10 Fusion processor, according to the pair. AppleInsider talks about why Apple might do that, and what it would mean for the iMac Pro.

Hands On with the Sonnet eGFX Breakaway Puck with Radeon RX 560 — External GPU enclosures can be pretty massive. Sonnet has a solution to the problem with the portable eGFX Breakaway Puck — and AppleInsider has one to test.

Lisa Jackson doubles-down on 100% recycled material use goal, lauds Apple’s environmental efforts — Apple’s Senior Vice President for Vice President Environment, Policy and Social Initiatives Lisa Jackson granted an interview to an Australian publication, and continued to drive home Apple’s goal towards using 100 percent recycled materials across all of its products, Apple’s “right to repair” philosophy, and Apple’s point of view on the taxes it pays.

Reflector 3 highlights new UI, better performance — The latest version of Reflector is out. The utility turns a Mac or Windows PC into an AirPlay receiver. Reflector 3 will be priced at US$14.99, but the company will have a US$11.99 introductory price in play for a while as well as discounts for existing users of Reflector 2.

X accolade, Ive argues, glitch fix, Vimeo HDR, post PC, HomePod delay, Texas Ranger warrant, iRig Keys I/O, X wallpapers, watchOS 1 no longer


Vimeo has added HDR support to its app

Time includes iPhone X in its list of ’25 Best Inventions of 2017′ — Time Magazine has named the iPhone X as one of the 25 Best Inventions of 2017, calling Apple’s flagship mobile device ‘arguably the world’s most sophisticated smartphone’ over its new display, its augmented reality applications, and the inclusion of Face ID.

Apple designer Jony Ive defends ditching home button, other tech in interview about iPhone X — In an interview published late last week, Apple chief design officer Jony Ive argued for the company’s sometimes controversial decisions to abandon common technologies – in the case of the iPhone X, foregoing a home button in favour of touchscreen gestures. [Apple has always done this – will continue to do this. Either get used o it or use inferior tech.]

iOS 11.1.2 released with fix for iPhone X/cold weather glitch — Apple has released iOS 11.1.2, which addresses an issue in which some iPhone X models became unresponsive in cold weather.

Vimeo adds support for vivid HDR colors on iPhone X, iPad Pro, Apple TV 4K — Popular streaming video service Vimeo has updated its official iOS and tvOS apps to take advantage of Apple’s recent support for high dynamic range video across its platform of devices, including the iPhone X.

New Apple video blurs the line between iPad Pro and computer, repeats Steve Jobs ‘post-PC’ concept — Apple has published a new YouTube video, and with it is repeating the message that “a post-PC world may be closer than you think.”

Apple delays HomePod launch until ‘early 2018’ — Originally scheduled to debut in December, Apple has pushed the launch of its Siri-equipped HomePod speaker into early 2018, saying the company needs more time to complete the home audio accessory.

Apple is served search warrants in connection with church shooting in Texas — Texas Rangers investigating the mass shooting in Sutherland Springs, Texas, have served search warrants on Apple, seeking digital photos, messages, documents and other types of data that might have been stored by gunman Devin Patrick Kelley, who was found with an iPhone after he killed himself.

IK Multimedia ships iRig Keys I/O keyboard MIDI interface that can record microphones and other instruments — IK Multimedia has added another device to its audio interface line, introducing the iRig Keys I/O as pair of MFi-certified MIDI controllers that can be used to create music on an iPhone or iPad, using its included keyboard or via another instrument or microphone using the device as a preamp.

5 Places to find cool iPhone X wallpapers — The iPhone X OLED screen is beautiful, so how do you show off its visual awesomeness? With really cool wallpapers, of course. Read on to see some of the cool free iPhone X wallpapers Mac Observer found. [I always just shoot my own.]

Apple announces that it won’t accept app updates built with watchOS 1.0 SDK after April 1, 2018 — Apple has issued guidance to developers, suggesting it will discontinue support for watchOS 1, with updates for apps limited to that version no longer accepted after April 1, 2018.

Open Day for Apple Park, billions, Berners-Lee help, Apple’s VC of diversity stepping down


Apple Park Visitor Center opened on Friday — Bryan Chaffin stopped by, took some pics, bought a shirt, and talked to folks. Here are some of those photos and his thoughts “on this delightful place“. when the Apple Park Visitor Center opened, Apple hosted a gathering of Cupertino neighbours.

Apple paid $3.3 billion in Q4 dividends as its market valuation grew $162B larger than Google — Last Thursday, Apple paid its shareholders a record (as of November 13th) a quarterly dividend of $0.63 per share, totaling $3 billion in dividends on its outstanding shares for the quarter, on stock that has appreciated 46.5 percent so far in 2017.

Tim Berners-Lee wants help in protecting net neutrality from Ajit Pai’s FCC — Under Chairman Ajit Pai, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is coming for Net Neutrality, facts and public sentiment be damned. Internet-inventor Tim Berners-Lee wrote an editorial for USA Today asking Americans to help save the Internet from an irresponsible vote on Net Neutrality expected from the FCC.

Denise Young Smith stepping down as Apple’s VP of diversity and inclusion — TechCrunch has reported that Denise Young Smith, Apple’s vice president of diversity and inclusion, will leave at the end of 2017. No reason was given for her departure; evidently, it’s a career choice change she’s made.

Apple Mac, iPhone & iPad news for New Zealanders

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