The Apocalypticon ~ Politics, Kavanaugh, climate, poison, Ebola, rat hepatitis, flu, NZ law


Kavanaugh’s family listens at the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing (Image: Jim Bourg, Reuters)

German far right party now at second — In last September’s elections, the Alternative for Germany (AfD) became the first far-right party to win seats in the Bundestag in more than half a century, becoming the official opposition to Merkel’s ruling ‘grand coalition’ of conservatives and social democrats. Although — or precisely because — the AfD is treated as a pariah in the legislature, its support is growing among German voters. Now it’s in second place with 18% of the vote. [They only need to double that to be where Hitler was when he took power.]
Beer-swilling misogynist Kavanaugh requires millions — Since July, when President Trump nominated Kavanaugh, the warring advocacy groups have spent some $10 million on TV ads either assailing or praising him.
Facebook consternation at Kavanaugh support — Hundreds of Facebook employees have reportedly expressed anger that an executive attended Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh’s public hearing last week to support him. Joel Kaplan, Facebook’s head of global policy, was at Kavanaugh’s hearing because he is reportedly close friends with the Supreme Court Justice nominee …

Sagging climate — Never drink from the tap: Americans across the country, from Maynard’s home in rural Appalachia to urban areas like Flint, Michigan, or Compton, California, are facing a lack of clean, reliable drinking water. At the heart of the problem is a water system in crisis: ageing, crumbling infrastructure and a lack of funds to pay for upgrading it.
Indonesian tsunami warning system hadn’t worked for years — After an earthquake and tsunami in Indonesia on Friday left more than 800 people dead, a spokesperson for the nation’s board of national disaster affairs revealed that a critical part of its warning and detection system hasn’t been working for years. Not one of 22 buoys was functional…

Poison — The red tide algae bloom that’s plagued Florida’s Gulf Coast for months has now jumped east to the Atlantic. Florida officials are dubbing it an “extremely rare” occurrence, underscoring just how far from over the state’s algae crisis is.
Old poisons could kill most orcas — A group of industrial chemicals humans started banning decades ago could cause many of the world’s orca whale populations to collapse over the next century, an alarming new study has found.
Artificial sweeteners become toxic in the gut — Researchers from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel and Nanyang Technological University in Singapore tested the toxicity of aspartame, sucralose, saccharine, neotame, advantame, and acesulfame potassium-k. They observed that when exposed to only 1 milligram per millilitre of the artificial sweeteners, the bacteria found in the digestive system became toxic.

Ebola could spread beyond Congo — More than two months since an Ebola outbreak was declared in an eastern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo, health officials are still struggling to end it. At least 130 people have been infected. Last week the World Health Organization declared the risk has gone from “high” to “very high” that the disease will spread to other parts of the country and to neighbouring countries.
Rat hepatitis migrated to a human — A 56-year-old man from Hong Kong contracted the rat-specific version of hepatitis E, something never observed before in a human patient. Health officials are now scrambling to understand how this could have happened — and the possible implications.
US had more flu deaths last winter than in decades — This past winter’s flu season was quickly recognised as one of the worst to come along in a long time. But new data from the Centres of Disease Control and Prevention highlights just destructive it was in the United States. According to new data, there were 80,000 flu-related deaths last season, the single highest toll seen in at least four decades.

New Zealand enacts digital search border control law — The Customs and Excise Act 2018 now in effect sets guidelines around how Customs can carry out ‘digital strip-searches.’ Previously, NZ Customs could stop anyone at the border and demand to see their electronic devices. However, the law did not specify that people had to also provide a password. The updated law makes clear that travelers must provide access, whether that be a password, pin-code or fingerprint, but officials would need to have a reasonable suspicion of wrongdoing.
Customs spokesperson Terry Brown said. If people refused to comply, they could be fined up to $5000 and their device would be seized and forensically searched. Mr Brown said the law struck the “delicate balance” between a person’s right to privacy and Customs’ law enforcement responsibilities. [Yeah, that’s delicate all right!] Council for Civil Liberties spokesperson Thomas Beagle said the law was an unjustified invasion of privacy. [Because, you know, it’s an unjustified invasion of privacy.]

And in good news … it’s spring here in New Zealand and it’s beautiful.

 

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