Futurology ~ Galactic map, home-bound aliens, Spooky Action, DNA structure, arm-projector, Euro-AI


(A rendering of the “twisted knot” DNA structure. Illustration: Zeraati et al., Nat Chem, 2018)

Biggest galactic map yet — Astronomers from the European Space Agency’s Gaia mission will release the biggest map of our galaxy ever, using data collected by the Gaia space telescope. That includes 1.7 billion stars, as well as new information that could potentially solve some cosmic mysteries.
~ Well, sniff, I will of course be hanging out for version 3 with the Spectral Data …

Aliens stuck at home … maybe literally — Rocky worlds larger than Earth are commonplace in the galaxy, and a few of them may even be habitable. Which poses an interesting question: how difficult would it be for aliens living on these super-Earths to launch rockets into space, given the tremendous gravity? According to new research, it would be difficult to the point of impossibility – meaning that some aliens may be perpetually trapped on their home worlds.
~ Which also makes them rather hard to visit. 

Uranus really does smell — According to a study published in Nature Astronomy, scientists have determined the atmosphere of Uranus smells like rotten eggs. The smell of Uranus was determined by the use of an Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectrometer (NIFS), an instrument that allows scientists to determine what an atmosphere is composed of based upon the reflections of sunlight that bounce off of it.
~ Now surely they could have made the spectrometer’s acronym ‘SNIF’? Come on, people! Bit of effort here. 

Einstein shows his Spooky Action — For the first time, scientists have managed to show quantum entanglement – which Einstein famously described as “spooky action at a distance” – happening between macroscopic objects, a major step forward in our understanding of quantum physics. Quantum entanglement links particles in a way that they instantly affect each other, even over vast distances. On the surface, this powerful bond defies classical physics and, generally, our understanding of reality, which is why Einstein found it so spooky.
~ And it smells like roses. 

Australian scientists discover another human DNA structure — Scientists have identified the existence of a new DNA structure that looks more like a twisted, four-stranded knot than the double helix we all know from high school biology. The newly identified structure, detailed in the journal Nature Chemistry, could play a crucial role in how DNA is expressed.
Some research had previously suggested the existence of DNA in this tangled form, dubbed an i-motif (main picture above), but it had never before been detected in living cells outside of the test tube. Researchers at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research in Australia, though, found that not only does the structure exist in living human cells, but it is even quite common.
~ Good effort there. 

Arm projector — Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, however, have now created a smartwatch prototype with a built-in projector that turns the wearer’s arm into a smartphone-sized touchscreen.
Despite what you may have seen on crowdfunding sites, the LumiWatch is the first smartwatch to integrate a fully-functional laser projector and sensor array, allowing a screen projected on a user’s skin to be poked, tapped and swiped just like a traditional touchscreen.
~ Yeah, how long is your arm going to last in an intense game? And so I will invent the Mouse Pad Sleeve, mwa-ah-ahh!

European AI — Leading scientists have drawn up plans for a vast multinational European institute devoted to world-class artificial intelligence (AI) research in a desperate bid to nurture and retain top talent in Europe.
The new institute would be set up for similar reasons as Cern, the particle physics lab near Geneva, which was created after the Second World War to rebuild European physics and reverse the brain drain of the brightest and best scientists to the US. Named the European Lab for Learning and Intelligent Systems, or Ellis, the proposed AI institute would have major centres in a handful of countries, the *UK included, with each employing hundreds of computer engineers, mathematicians and other scientists with the express aim of keeping Europe at the forefront of AI research.
~ Oh wait: sorry, UK, you had all those insular twits voting for Brexit, so maybe not. 

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