Five Tip Friday ~ New capabilities in iOS 11


1/ iOS 11 lets you turn off iPhone or iPad without the power button — This is  handy in the case of random hardware failures and other glitches. A long press and hold on the Home button is normally used to bring up the power off screen, though other methods can be used in emergency situations and simultaneously pressing and holding the sleep/wake and home button on iPhone models without force sensitive home buttons will reset the device.
On iPhone 7, Apple introduced a static, non-moving home button that use force-sensing components to work, similar in function to 3D Touch displays. Without a mechanical home button, Apple changed the reset procedure to incorporate the volume down button, meaning users simply had to squeeze both sides of their handset to force restart.
iOS 11 brings a new software option: Navigate to the Settings app and tap on General, then scroll down to the bottom of the menu.
Tap on the Shut Down option highlighted in blue font. The usual iOS shutdown screen will immediately appear.
Slide the large power button to the right along the slide to power off track to shut down your device. Alternatively, you can cancel the action by pressing the X button at the bottom of the screen.

2/ Make new Notes from an iPad Pro Lock Screen — If you have an iPad Pro and Apple Pencil and want to quickly jot a note you don’t need to unlock your tablet first. You can make new notes from the lock screen without a passcode. Read on to learn how.
First you’ll need a 12.9-inch or 10.5-inch iPad Pro, and an Apple Pencil that’s already paired. Now tap on your iPad’s lock screen with the Apple Pencil to launch the Notes app.
Tap your iPad Pro lock screen with your Apple Pencil to start a new note
You’ll see a locked down version of the Notes app, which makes sense because you don’t want just anyone looking through your notes. Anything you write or draw, however, will be added to your Notes library. To disable the feature, launch Settings, tap Notes, tap Access Notes from Lock Screen and choose Off. That stops your Apple Pencil from showing the Notes app from the lock screen.

3/ Turn on iOS Automatic Reader Mode in Safari — In macOS High Sierra, there are Safari website controls that let you automatically turn on Reader mode for individual websites. But you can do the same thing on iOS.
iOS Automatic Reader Modeis one of the long-press Safari shortcuts. (To learn more about these, check out the Mac Observer’s iOS: Long Press Icons For Safari Shortcuts.)
To enable iOS automatic Reader mode, navigate to a website for which you want to turn automatic Reader mode on. In the address bar you’ll see the Reader icon on the left – it consists of four horizontal lines. Tap it to turn Reader mode on or off. To get Reader mode to automatically activate, long-press the icon. A dialog box appears, asking if you want to use it on that website, or all websites.
This handy feature lets you hide ads on a website without using an ad blocker, too.

(Image from the Mac Observer source article)

4/ See your Purchased Apps List in the App Store — The App Store got a major redesign in iOS 11, and one of the things that changed is the purchased apps list. It’s in a slightly new location, and it may not be intuitive for everyone since it’s different than iOS 10.
In iOS 10, you could find the list by tapping the Updates icon at the bottom, then the Purchased tab at the top. In iOS 11, there are different tabs at the bottom, and the list is hidden.
In the upper right corner, you should see your profile picture. Your photo shows up no matter which tab you tap (except search).
In the profile section, you’ll see a tab to view your Apple ID, the Purchased tab, and ways to redeem a gift card or code.
Once you tap on the Purchased tab, you’ll see a list of all of the apps you’ve purchased, and ones that aren’t on your phone at the moment. If you have Family Sharing enabled, you can also see the apps your family members purchased. In your purchased apps list, you can swipe right on each app to hide it from the list. You can tap on the cloud icon to re-download them too.
To find an app you’ve bought in the past, there is a handy search bar.

5/ Draw in Mail messages and send ’em— To add a quick sketch to an email message you’re crafting on your iPhone or iPad you don’t need to make a trip over to the Notes app first. iOS 11 lets you draw right in the Mail app, but it takes a few taps to make it happen.
Launch Mail and start a new message
Tap-and-hold in the message body area to show the ‘Select’ pop-up, then tap the pop-up’s right arrow until you see Insert Drawing.
Tap Insert Drawing
Use the markup tools to create a sketch, then tap Done to add your sketch to your Mail message
Tap Insert Drawing. Your drawing will appear in your Mail message. There are, however, a couple limitations: you’re limited to the same markup tools you see in the Notes app, and you can’t crop your drawing to get rid of extra white space.
Limitations aside, it’s an easy way to quickly include a sketch to your email messages without needing to use another app and then tack the drawing on as an attachment.