Five Tip Friday ~ Safari, privacy, wiFi and the Help Viewer


1/ Zoom in Safari using a Magic Trackpad — In the Trackpad or Mouse system preference pane, click the Scroll & Zoom tab, and then you can opt to check or uncheck Smart Zoom. Now, when you double-tap with two fingers, Safari and other apps will zoom the item tapped upon to fill the screen. Two-finger double-tap again, and it zooms back out to the normal view. This zoom remains preserved when you go back a page and back forward.
Apple also offers a systemwide zoom in the Accessibility preference pane: open the pane, select Zoom, and you can opt to enable or disable the Use Scroll Gesture with Modifier Keys to Zoom. (The Control key is the default modifier.)

2/ Prevent tracking in Safari —  macOS High Sierra will have a feature called Intelligent Tracking Prevention, and Sierra already has some anti-tracking abilities. Safari uses machine learning to prevent tracking in the browser, specially cross-site tracking. Open Safari and go to Preferences (press ⌘+,, or Safari > Preferences in the menu).
Click on the Privacy tab in the window that pops up.
You’ll see a new Website Tracking section (shown above) with two items: ‘Prevent cross-site tracking’ and ‘Ask websites not to track me’. The latter is also found in macOS Sierra and is equivalent to a Do Not Track setting. However, most websites won’t voluntarily honour this setting, and aren’t even legally obligated to do so.
(Apple also streamlined cookie blocking in Safari 11. Instead of having the usual settings like Always block, Allow from current website only, Allow from websites I visit, Always allow, in macOS High Sierra you will also just get the option to block all cookies, since Intelligent Tracking Prevention does the rest.)

3/ Use Modifier Keys with Safari history — You can click-and-hold on Safari’s back button to see a list of where you’ve been (above). This lets you quickly jump back to somewhere without hitting that back button several times.
There are a couple of things you can do with this button to make it even cooler: if you’re looking for URLs instead, hold down the Option key on your keyboard before you click and click-and-hold the back button to do just that.
If you want to keep your existing page as a tab or a window before you open something from your history, that’s easy too. Obviously, when you click the back button without holding it, Safari will go back to the last page you visited. Hold down the Shift key on your keyboard and click that button, and the browser will instead open your last page in a new window. If you hold down Command, your last page will open in a new tab.
This Shift-or-Command trick also works if you have the history view open (History menu>Show All History). If you click-and-hold on your back button to bring up that little popover, holding down Shift and choosing any of the pages you visited opens it in a new window; Command opens it in a new tab. This behavior is actually all through Safari: shift-click a bookmark or a history item, and it’ll open in a new window; Command-click a link, and it’ll open in a new tab.
(If your version of Safari isn’t behaving in the way described here, be sure to check out your settings at Safari > Preferences under the Tabs section.)

4/ Changing your WiFi Password on an AirPort device — Sometimes you’ve may want to change your Wi-Fi password – perhaps you gave it to someone you now wish you hadn’t, or maybe your roommate moved out, but you’ve seen them outside your house leeching off your connection. (I’m sure that’s happened to someone.) If you have an Apple router (like a Time Capsule, AirPort Extreme, AirPort Express), it’s really simple to change this.
Launch AirPort Utility (it’s in the Applications > Utilities folder, which you can easily get to using Finder’s Go menu.)
When AirPort Utility opens, click on your AirPort device and choose Edit.
You may have to enter the password for your device to do this; this is usually the same as your Wi-Fi password, but if it’s not, then…uh…just keep on guessing until you figure it out. Fingers crossed. (You might consider going and checking your keychain to see if it’s stored there if you’re having trouble.)
Once you click Edit, choose the Wireless tab at the top. There you’ll find your wireless password.
So just type what you’d like your new one to be into both the first password box and the Verify Password box. Be sure that the ‘Remember this password in my keychain’ choice is on, too, but don’t mess with any other settings there unless you know what you’re doing.
After your options are set, click Update. AirPort Utility will then of course warn you of what you’re about to do, and restart the device – full service will recommence after reboot.
Keep two things in in mind: first, changing your Wi-Fi password doesn’t change your base station device’s password; if you’d like to make that the same, head over to the Base Station tab within AirPort Utility.
Secondly, everything you own that connects to your Wi-Fi – iPhones, iPads, computers, Apple TVs, and printers, for example – will need to be reconnected to your network afterward, so don’t undertake this task lightly as you’ll be typing the new password into all those devices. It’s no fun to spend the evening changing passwords on printers if you haven’t planned for it.

5/ Use Terminal to send the macOS Help Viewer to the back — You can access your Mac’s built-in support info by choosing Help from the menu at the top of any program. There is one irritation, though: the Help Viewer window always sits on top of everything else, even if you switch programs. It will stay in front until you close it (although you can Minimise it into the Dock by clicking the orange button at top left). Staying on top of everything can be frustrating  when you’re attempting to try out a solution that the help pages suggest.
Luckily, you can change this behavior through Terminal (it’s in your Utilities folder inside the Applications folder). To do so, copy the following command…

defaults write com.apple.helpviewer DevMode -bool YES

…and paste it into the Terminal program after the flashing prompt. When the command is pasted in, press Return, and then the Help Viewer window will behave just like most of the other windows on your Mac: if you click on another window or program, it’ll move to the background.
If you decide you want to put things back the way they were, just go back to Terminal, replace the “YES” with “NO” in the command, and press Return:

defaults write com.apple.helpviewer DevMode -bool NO

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