Kuiper Belt object, lighter proton, Trappist tides, gravity affect, squishy heart, science song, Indian solar rail, Galaxy mag online, sturdy Tardigrades


NASA captures impossible glimpse Of Kuiper Belt object billions of kilometres away — In about a year and a half from now, the New Horizons Spacecraft will whiz past a distant Kuiper Belt object named 2014 MU69. This rocky relic of the ancient Solar System, located about 6.4 billion kilometres away, just passed in front of a distant star, resulting in one of the more extraordinary eclipses ever captured by scientists.
~ Nice catch.

The Proton is lighter than we thought — You can’t weigh the universe’s smallest particles on a bathroom scale. But in a clever new experiment, physicists have found one such particle – the proton – is lighter than previously thought. The researchers found the mass to be 1.007276466583 atomic mass units. That’s roughly 30 billionths of a percent lower than the average value from past experiments: a seemingly tiny difference that is actually significant by three standard deviations. The result both creates and clears up mysteries, and could help explain the universe as we know it.
~ 4.

Massive tides could boost TRAPPIST-1’s prospects for life — Earlier this year, Earthlings rejoiced when scientists announced the discovery of three rocky exoplanets in the habitable zone of TRAPPIST-1, an ‘ultracool dwarf’ star located just 39 light years away. Soon after, astronomers brought us back to Earth, pointing out that it might be hard for life to survive on a world in such a tight orbit around such a dim star. But the debate has now taken yet another delicious twist, this time, in favour of aliens.
~ For Earthlings really now how to party, ultra cool dwarf. 

Scientists measure gravity effect entity particles for the first time — Humans will probably never explore the area around a black hole, at least while you’re alive. That’s mostly because most black holes are too far away, and even if we could travel to them, it’s unlikely we’d survive their gravitational pull. That means that if we want to study the wacky effects extreme gravity might have, we need to get creative — which is exactly what an international team of physicists has just done.
~ Quick, make more Well semimetal. 

Squishy artificial heart — Researchers in Europe have created a soft artificial heart that mimics the real thing. It still isn’t ready for prime time, but the approach, in which the developers used silicone and 3D-printing, could revolutionise the way patients with heart disease are treated.
~ Are, don’t it just melt your heart! (Yikes!)\

Science picks ‘best’ song — Is there one song, or one kind of song, that’s generally more enjoyable? Recently, author Tom Cox tweeted some musings on the philosophy behind what makes the “best song ever”. A significant portion of the internet, however, argued that he was full of crap because the best song of all time is Toto’s classic 1982 hit, Africa.
~ I still shudder in pure revulsion whenever I hear even one note of any Beegees’ disco-era material. What say you, science? 

India to save thousands of litres of fuel with solar carriages — India’s massive diesel-guzzling railway network is getting serious about its experiments with solar. On July 14th, Indian Railways rolled out its first train with rooftop solar panels that power the lights, fans, and information display systems inside passenger coaches. The train will still be pulled by a diesel-powered locomotive, but a set of 16 solar panels atop each coach will replace the diesel generators that typically power these appliances.
~ I guess people will be dissuaded more from riding on the roofs, then. 

Galaxy online — Galaxy magazine was a pulpy, science fiction paradise from 1950 to 1980, publishing some of the most important futuristic voices of the 20th century — to say nothing of the amazing cover illustrations. And you can read hundreds of issues from its heyday online, all thanks to Archive.org.
~ Yay!

Tardigrades would be tardy survivors — Microscopic tardigrades, also known as “water bears”, are the toughest animals on the planet, capable of withstanding intense radiation, extreme temperatures, and even the vacuum of space. In a fascinating new study, researchers have shown that tardigrades are poised to survive literally anything that nature throws at them — and that of the animals alive today, they will be the last ones standing before the Sun annihilates the Earth billions of years from now.
~ I’m still not sure I’m jealous, though. 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s