Futurology ~ many failed stars, Titan landing, particle find, leaping’ bot, b-i-g battery, Ada Lovelace maths, mens’ clocks, anti-aging pill, ancient Chinese giants


Our galaxy’s failed stars — New research suggests our galaxy contains as many as 100 billion brown dwarfs, a type of celestial object that didn’t have quite what it takes to become a full-fledged star. The finding shows just how ubiquitous brown dwarfs really are, and how many false starts are involved in the formation of new stars.
~ Well it’s all a matter of degree, isn’t it? I mean, even bit part players on Shortland Street are referred to as ‘stars’ these days. 

Saturn’s smoon Titan has a good landing sport — Saturn’s largest moon, Titan, is a giant nightmare beach. While its electrically charged sand wouldn’t make for a relaxing holiday, new research suggests the planet might not be as hostile to robotic visitors as we think. Although its lakes are full of ultra-cold liquid methane and ethane, they could be placid enough for future space probe to land on. Still not great for swimming, though.
~ I’ll worry about that once it gets added to Apple Maps. 

Particle find reignites old controversy — Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland have discovered an exciting new particle – or rather, an exciting combination of particles. It doesn’t have quite the same impact that the Higgs Boson (the one people called the God Particle) did five years ago. But it does have people talking, and many folks are thinking about a controversial set of results from an older experiment.
~ For me, that would be the time I tried to make a cocktail from red wine and brandy. Eeeuwch!

One-legged robot has incredible leap — A  little robot from the University of California Berkeley is putting on a jumping clinic. Salto is a bot that not only leaps four times higher than its height (higher than humans could ever manage) but strings together multiple jumps and bounds off walls in the process. Oh, and it’s only got one leg.
~ And why, you may ask? To get over rubble, which defeats wheeled robots. 

Tesla is building the world’s largest lithium-ion battery in South Australia — The installation is 60% larger than any other large-scale battery energy storage system on the planet. In partnership with the SA government and French renewables company Neoen, alongside the third stage of the Hornsdale Wind Farm, the PowerPack battery farm will top 100 megawatts capacity and provide 129 megawatt-hours of energy generation to the region to load-balance the state’s renewable energy generation and to allow emergency back-up power if a shortfall in energy production is predicted.
~ Home storage and release batteries are the real answer to the solar power conundrum, though. 

Myths of Ada Lovelace’s maths exploded — Two mathematics historians investigated the Lovelace-Byron family archives (which are available online) to confirm the early mathematical prowess of Ada Lovelace for two scholarly journals. The work challenges widespread claims that Lovelace’s mathematical abilities were more “poetical” than practical, or indeed that her knowledge was so limited that Babbage himself was likely to have been the author of the paper that bears her name. The authors pinpoint Lovelace’s keen eye for detail, fascination with big questions, and flair for deep insights, which enabled her to challenge some deep assumptions in her teacher’s work. Her ambition, in time, to do significant mathematical research was entirely credible, though sadly curtailed by her ill-health and early death
~ So there, widespread claimers!

Men and the Biological Clock — A new study reveals a couple’s chances of having a baby fall with the man’s age. Laura Dodge, who led the research at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School in Boston, said that couples should bear the findings in mind when planning a family. “When making this decision, they should also be considering the man’s age,” she said. Scientists have long known that a woman’s chances of conceiving naturally drop sharply from the age of 35, but fertility research has focused so much on women that male factors are less well understood.
~ How is this surprising? 

Cheap pill promises anti-aging impact — Nir Barzilai knows the science of aging. He is the director of the Institute for Aging Research at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx. He plans a cheap, generic, demonstrably safe pharmaceutical that has already shown, in a host of preliminary studies, that it may be able to help stave off many of the worst parts of growing old.
~ Otherwise it’s the rich who won’t age, while dispensing with the rest of us in favour of robots.

Ancient Chinese giants — Researchers in China recently uncovered the skeletal remains of an unusually tall group of individuals who lived in China’s Shandong province some 5000 years ago. With some reaching heights well over 1.8m, these Neolithic humans were a sign of things to come.
~ Well, maybe they just had great diets. Anglo-Saxons, for example, were often this height – English selections diminish quite dramatically with the growth of towns after that period. 

 

 

Read more at https://www.gizmodo.com.au/2017/07/archaeologists-unearth-grave-of-giants-in-china/#8trioP2PispF2ybf.99