Five Tip Friday ~ Sharing locations, closing all apps, Safari reader and DNS in iOS


1/ Share your location quickly from the Maps app — It’s pretty quick to share your location in Messages, but sometimes you’re in the Maps app when you suddenly think ‘it would be great to tell so-n-so this is where I am, or will be…’ and to be able to do this via other apps like Mail, as well.
Luckily, this is possible.
In the Maps app, navigate to the location you want to pin and share. Tap and hold on that location until the round red pin flag appears (shown at left).
To fine-tune the location, tap on Edit Location – now you can drag the map around until the pin is exactly where you want it.
Anyway, once you’ve got it where you want it, tap Done to go back to the main map screen.)
Now tap the Share button (marked above, at lower right) to send out the pin location to whoever you want, via Messages, Mail, Twitter, Facebook, or with any other app with its Sharing Sheet extension turned on.

2/ Share your GPS coordinates — To get really geeky, you can also share your precise geographical coordinates. Open up the Compass app and wait a few seconds. Your latitude and longitude should appear at the bottom of the screen. Tap and hold on the coordinates, and then choose Copy: you can now paste your coordinates into a text message, email or anywhere else.

After you double-click your Home button, you can swipe left and right through running apps to quickly change to another (tap on the one you want) or swipe upwards to ‘quit’ them (stop them using your iDevice’s resources, RAM, data etc)

3/ Close all running apps in one hit — This is contentious with some claiming it’s not necessary. But I’m firmly in the camp that having dozens of apps running at once makes your iDevice laggy, since apps don’t automatically quit when you can’t see them on iPhone/iPad. In other words, having an app running, then pressing the Home button to launch another app, actually leaves that first app running until you can have dozens of apps all running at once – you can see this by double-clicking the Home button, from which view you can swipe apps upwards to actually quit them, or swipe left and right to go through them and tap the ones you want to work or play in again.
But the following process suspends all your apps, freeing up memory and processor time:
• Press the Sleep/Wake button until you see the slider to shut down your iPhone.
• Now press and hold the Home Button for approximately five seconds, or until you are returned to either your Lock or Home Screen…
That’s it, your apps have all been suspended. If you double-press the Home Button, you’ll still see each of them still listed as if they are running, and they’re still instantly available form this view, but you might notice these apps actually refresh (or relaunch) when you tap on them. That’s because they’ve actually been properly suspended, freeing up memory.

4/ Shared Links in iOS Safari — Shared Links is a tab that’s been around since iOS 7, but was used to just support Twitter accounts. Now the feature also supports RSS feeds. To get to the shared links, tap on the Bookmarks button at the bottom row of Safari. Next, tap on the tab with the “@” sign, and you’ll be in your Shared Links. One of the first feeds that will show up in Shared Links, if you have signed into the social media network in the Settings app, is your Twitter timeline. Long-hold on that Bookmarks button, and a new menu pops up with Add Bookmark, Add to Reading List and Add to Shared Links. Tap on that last one, and voilà, the RSS feed for the page you’re looking shows up.
If Add to Shared Links doesn’t appear, try going to an article on that site instead of the home page. The Shared Links option will often appear then.

5/ Easily change your DNS — This won’t apply to most people, but it’s possible to change your DNS address to access more online than your typical ISP might allow. DNS stands for Domain Name System, the type of system used to name any device or service connected to the internet. It translates numerical IP addresses to more human-friendly names (ie, to http://www.mac-nz.com). Your browser requests are sent to a DNS server controlled by a third party – usually this would be your ISP. But it’s possible for your ISP to know which websites you visit, but also censor websites it doesn’t like. Thankfully, there are DNS services that are committed to privacy and defeating censorship. Assuming you know some of these like OpenNicProject: you will need the DNS addresses: a series of numbers separated by full stops.
Open the Settings app on your iOS device and navigate to Wi-Fi and find the network you’re connected to. Tap the blue “i” to the right of it. This is where you see the network settings.
Look for the section called DNS. You can tap on the empty space, and type in the DNS primary and secondary server. Type in the primary address first, followed by a comma (no space), then the secondary server address.

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