Five Tip Friday ~ Public Calendar, folder hierarchy, Safari tabs, Finder tabs


sharecal

1/ Configure a Public Calendar — Using iCloud, you can set up a public calendar. This is different from the typical iCloud calendar sharing in which all participants can usually edit and add events themselves. Depending on how you set the permissions, a public calendar will instead show anyone with its link all of its events but won’t allow them to make any changes. While this used to be only available to iCloud users, now PC users can also access these public calendars as long as they’ve got a program that supports iCalendar files (as Microsoft Outlook does).
Open the Calendar program on your Mac, then decide whether you’d like to use an existing calendar or create a new blank one. Keep in mind that anyone with the link will be able to view all of the events you add to this calendar, so if privacy’s a big concern, then I would start with a blank one to be sure you haven’t added anything in the past: File>New Calendar from the top menu. Name your creation within the sidebar and press the Return key to accept the name, then hold down the Control key on your keyboard and click on that calendar name in the sidebar to get the pop-out menu (shown above).
Click that, and you can set the calendar’s sharing.
Now you need to send the link that appears to the right of ‘URL’ to the people who might like to subscribe. You can do that by clicking that little Share Sheet icon to the right of the link, which gives you the usual choices for messaging or emailing that info, or you can just copy the link from that box and paste it in somewhere to send it.
hen your recipient clicks the link on a Mac, they will see something like ‘Allow Permission’. If permission is granted, Calendar will open and offer to subscribe to your Calendar. (There’s more about this at Mac Observer, although the writer may have been using an older version of Calendar as her prison are slightly different to the latest setup detailed above).

2/ See the hierarchy of your File Locations — Clicking on the name of a file may give you some options for what to do with it, depending on what program you’re in. However, you can also right-click, Control-click, or Command-click on title bar of a file in the Finder to see a hierarchical view of where that file lives. This works in tons of places around your Mac, too. When you’ve got that little box open, you can click any of the folders shown to jump right to it.
One place this is unexpectedly helpful is in Mail. If you’re one of those who double-clicks to open emails into their own windows, a simple Command- or Control-click of its subject at the top will reveal its full hierarchical location.
You can do this all around macOS, but Microsoft Office is an outlier. You can still see the same info using this trick in those applications, but not with a Command-click. Only a right- or Control-click will do.

3/ Mac Safari tabs — macOS has long had a keyboard shortcut for restoring Safari tabs. All you have to do is press the Command (⌘) key and while it’s held down, the Shift and while they’re both held down, the T key in old versions of OS X …but in macOS Sierra, you can hold down ⌘ + Shift, and press T multiple times to restore multiple tabs.

foltabs

4/ Folder tabs — If you’re happily using Safari tabs (and you really, really should be) why not do the same thing in the Finder? Each Mac folder window is capable of using a tabbed interface, perfect for juggling multiple open folders within the same window.  But because tabs generally don’t appear in a folder window unless you specifically add them, it’s easy to miss that Mac folders have tabs. Once you get used to them, though, you’ll love ’em.
If a folder contains any subfolders, right-click (of holed down the Control key and normal-click) on one of those subfolders, then select Open in New Tab.
When you do, a new folder tab will appear in your original folder window, just like a new browser tab would in Safari.
You can switch folder “views” (icon, list, columns, etc.) in one tab while keeping the folder views different in other tabs, and you can also navigate to a completely different folder within a tab.
Just drag a folder tab onto the desktop to turn it into its own window.
To re-arrange your tabs within a folder window, click and drag a tab, just as you would in a browser window.
To turn a tab into a separate window,  click a folder tab and drag it out onto the desktop; when you do, it’ll snap into its very own window.

5/ Use tabs to rearrange where files are — You can also drag files from one folder tab to another: click and hold a file in one folder tab and drag it onto the tab of another folder. When you do, the top of the second folder tab will flash briefly, and then the tab itself will open; once it does, just drop the file wherever you’d like it to go in the tab.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s