Tuesday Talk ~ Apple fandom and logic


(Image from TechEBlog)
(Image from TechEBlog)

How can we tell if our love for Apple is logical or biased? That was a headline on the Mac Observer. I guess this is a question we all ask ourselves sometimes. I definitely had a very biased view of Apple once I first started using a Mac in 1989, because I could actually do things, create things and work out how things worked with a Mac, whereas in those days other computers pretty much needed a degree in rocket surgery to even print out a page (but pat yourselves on the back, you people).
By the time I became editor of NZ MacGuide magazine (2002-2007) things changed for me, partly because I started to realise how difficult Apple was to deal with. Basically, Apple was (and is) very secretive and suspicious, but this was amplified through the lens of Renaissance Inc, which had the only legal NZ Apple import/distribution license in that period. Renaissance never seemed to really know where it stood with Apple, and seemed scared of losing its exclusive deal, so any secrecy and suspicion was both obfuscated and amplified.
Things became a lot better once I forged a relationship with actual Apple staffers, and although they were always (and understandably) very guarded, they’re a fine bunch of interesting and creative people. Information from them has always been first class.

And I can still make and do things. Despite still not having a degree in rocket surgery, I can still make music, films, magazines and all sorts of other things with my Apple gear, and my iPhone is my always-available smart assistant. I am living in the future.
Windows and Android have made huge strides to offer similar attributes, largely thanks to Apple’s efforts (if even only by competing with what Apple does) but I’m so imbued with Apple operating procedures they’re like foreign languages, and every unwilling experience with them is an infuriating battle.
Of course, this is the same for people coming over to the Apple world, many of whom I have personally introduced to macOS and iOS over the years either through my Mac NZ efforts, via email or in person when I present to individuals and groups. This is a relatively easy process: explain the paradigm, introduce a few concepts and off they go.

So, am I still biased? Of course, but I have come to realise Apple has flaws. The child labour thing in Asia horrified me and I was very glad Apple made moves to address this (and of course, HP, Samsung, Dell etc were all using the same factories with the same conditions, they just never seemed to get caught in the searchlights). Not paying tax sickens me – I know there are New Zealanders who have similar beliefs and I think they should be allowed to not pay tax, since they consider this unjust.
Fair enough, don’t pay tax – but then they should be banned from using our roads, public lighting, hospital emergency rooms, parks and schools. This tax issue is less clear with Apple – the Inc makes an absolute fortune, which it constantly trumpets, yet also chooses to avoid paying tax because it’s found a ‘legal’ loophole.
And I feel abandoned on the Mac front sometimes, and critical of Apple’s direction, as should be clear from my posts under this heading. And I have to admit these things have shaken my loyalty.

But hey, I still love my Apple gear. I’m still happy and productive. And that’s still the bottom line.

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3 thoughts on “Tuesday Talk ~ Apple fandom and logic”

  1. I am so Apple biased I am virtually frothing at the mouth waiting for the new iMacs to eventually be released. My 2009 version is slowly giving up and I need some speed!

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