Review iPhone 6 — 4: video


iPhone 6 shot with the 6 Plus (the 8MP Plus did a better job than my 12MP Canon compact, for some reason.)
iPhone 6 shot with the 6 Plus (the 8MP Plus did a better job than my 12MP Canon compact, for some reason.)

Finally, how do the new iPhones do in video? One of the new features is a really fast refocus. This is thanks to what Apple calls ‘Focus Pixels’ which are sensitive to distinct angles of incoming light, and work together to determine the focus direction and how far to move the iSight lens.

Exposure — The same exposure controls you can use in photos exist for video. You can lighten or darken a photo or video on your viewfinder by up to four f-stops in either direction by tapping on the screen, then sliding your finger up and down to the right of the yellow focus/exposure area that appears.

Optical image stabilisation — Unlike the 6, the bigger iPhone 6 Plus has optical image stabilisation. It uses the A8 chip, the gyroscope, and the new M8 motion coprocessor to measure motion data and provide precise side-to-side lens movement to compensate for hand shake in low light. The 6’s new iSight camera also takes both long- and short-exposure images, which also helps reduce subject motion. That means on a pan-sweep, where you start filming and change the viewpoint of the iPhone Plus results in pretty smooth video, almost as if you have a steadycam, as you can see in the linked videos. (Note these all got sampled down to 720P when uploaded to Vimeo.) The videos were shot from the same point and light conditions within a 20-minute time frame. You can see that the iPhone 5 doesn’t refocus on the shed on the right, whereas the other two do.

iPhone 5 pan video

iPhone 6 video

iPhone 6 Plus